31 Days of Film in December-Week 1

1-7 [sunday-saturday]

December 1st-Stagecoach from 1939 (Director: John Ford, Writers: Dudley Nichols and based on “The Stage to Lordsburg” by Ernest Haycox, Stars: Claire Trevor and John Wayne, Cinematography: Bert Glennon, Runtime: 98 mins)

Don’t have a lot of time to write up the type of review a classic like this probably deserves, but hey, I sometimes skimp on reviews of classics. I liked Stagecoach. It was fun. We meet the characters, they set out, that bastard John Wayne comes along as he is headed to a town to kill a man. There is drama and action. Its a technically great film, it has several wonderful performances including Best Supporting Actor Oscar winner Thomas Mitchell.

Look, if you don’t want to watch a John Wayne film (or a western) at least check out the chase with the Native Americans. Its an incredibly well put together piece of action entertainment in 1939. Some incredible stunts, scenes, and just overall frantic movement. It holds up well as a piece of action cinema.

Thats all I’m writing for now, you can probably read up on more in dept reviews. I will say though, for the greatest year in cinema-I think Wizard of Oz is my favorite.

[Film]

December 2nd-Domino from 2005 (Director: Tony Scott, Writers: Richard Kelly with Story by Richard Kelly and Steve Barancik, Stars: Keira Knightly with Mickey Rourke, Edgar Ramirez, Delroy Lindo and Mo’Nique, Cinematography: Dan Mindel, Runtime: 127 mins)

A fictional story about a real woman. Domino Harvey was British woman that was the daughter of an actor and model, and would become a LA bounty hunter. The fiction is the story of a bails bondsman who works out a scheme to help his granddaughter that gets screwy with a armored truck robbery scam, four fall guys, connections to mob, Las Vegas money, the FBI and bounty hunters in the middle. Plus a reality tv show.

Directed by Tony Scott this is an ADD flashy, quick cut, style over substance piece of work. I like it. I like Keira Knightly, Edgar Rameriz, and Mickey Rourke. Its a strong cast that really carry this sometimes head scratching, convoluted story. Plus mixed in with some good laughs including Mo’Niques whole Jerry Springer sequence. But lets get back to Keira, I love her. Sure the character is over the top but Keira is so good in it. Flirty, confrontational, and full of energy. I think its a fantastic performance.

Now I should probably rip into the crazy story or some of the other under developed elements. Hmmmm… Nah. Domino on my rewatch is not a particularly good movie, but I really enjoyed it so I will ignore its short comings thank you very much.

[Trailer]

Macabre from 1958 (Director: William Castle, Writers: Robb White and Based on The Marble Forest by Theo Durran, Stars: William Prince and Jacqueline Scott, Cinematography: Carl E. Guthrie, Runtime: 73 mins)

A doctors daughter is kidnapped. The same doctor is becoming a pariah in town. Stuff is happening, decently acted and directed film with a good twist that made me raise my letterboxed grade.

[Film]

JEAN SEBERG DOUBLE FEATURE: December 4th-À Bout de Souffle aka Breathless from 1960 (Director/Writer: Jean-Luc Godard, Stars: Jean-Paul Belmondo and Jean Seberg, Cinematography: Raoul Coutard, Runtime: 87 mins)-DVD

Bonjour Tristesse from 1958 (Director: Otto Perminger, Writers: Arthur Laurents based on the novel by Françoise Sagan, Stars: Deborah Kerr, David Niven, Jean Seberg, Mylène Demongeot and Geoffrey Horne, Cinematography: Georges Périnal, Runtime: 94 mins) -comedy/crime usb

One of my favorite podcasts is You Must Remember This, about Hollywoods first century. However I skipped two seasons. One about Joan Crawford and the other about Jane Fonda and Jean Seberg. I corrected that this year and was very curious about Jean Seberg. Her Hollywood story os tragic. Plucked out of obscurity by an abusive director who grew tired of her, becomes an icon of French New Wave cinema, has a complicated personal life which includes supporting Black Panthers, and then sad end. So I acquired a handful of her films to check them out.

First is Breathless, about a criminal who shoots a police man then tries to hide out. Staying with a woman named Patricia who he is trying to seduce while trying to get a loan to flee to Italy. A lot of the film is focused on the two leads relationship. Her keeping him at arms length unsure if she should commit to him in anyway. Him pressing her to join him on Italy, and of course sex.

Breathless was Sebergs 4th film, first French film. She is beautiful and you can see in her style the popular French Girl fashion aesthetic. This is my first film with her and I am blown away with her French. I can’t find if she was dubbed, if she wasn’t her American accent is gone. She speaks so naturally. She moves-or graces around so effortlessly. She does so much with facial expressions and body language. Her co-star Jean-Paul Belmondo is good, in his wannabe 40s noir outfit but the character is a bit of a jerk. I only care when its him reacting and engaging Sebergs Patricia.

I don’t find the story it self to be engaging. Or rather Jean-Pauls character. The whole criminal on the run doesn’t do much for me. Its is less developed then the characters relationshiop. Sonwhen it goes to that stuff its boring. Well, the film is rough and drags in my opinion. I do recognize its style. The quick cuts, hand held feel, jumpy action, its an incredibly stylish picture. I am sure Seijun Seijun Suzuki borrowed some of this for his iconic Japanese gangaster flicks. I prefer those to this, but this is still a cool little picture from a technical level. With great black and white photography. I thought it was good, not in love with it by any means.

Bonjour Tristesse follows Cecile as she is out with her playboy father, both hob-nobbing with fancy people searching for fun. She reminisces about when a fashion designer Ann came to visit, became involved with her father, and how it threaten to hurt the carefree life she was enjoying. So Cecile engineered a way to break them up that ended badly.

So the team behind Breathless felt Patricia was the continuation of Cecile and I am not sure I see it. What I see is Jean Seberg delivering a varied performance. She is depressed, angry, happy, flirty and so on. She is doing a lot with a very deep character and it makes me wonder what the fuck was wrong with Otto Preimnger. He controlled her so much in their first film, gets mad at how it was recieved i part to the performance he crafted for her, then does this film and gives up on Jean? Of course this film has aged better than initial reviews but its clear Seberg had the spark. Oh well.

Co-stars David Niven and Deborah Kerr are also very good. Niven seems likeable enough as Raymond though he is a older playboy type. As the film progresses its clear he is a jerk. Deborah’s Ann is someone who wants happiness and sees a life for herself with Raymond and Cecile, and is fine but brings so much weight to those final scenes. Talk about face acting, her reaction to Raymond returning to his younger lover is rough. The way it makes Jean’s Cecile respond too is powerful stuff.

Preminger is one of the great old directors but I am not one of his fanboys. I think he delivers very good movies, and has a great eye for style and performances. Yet I am never fully enthralled in any of his pictures. Still, I liked Bonjour about as much as I liked any of his other films I have seen. The black and white scenes are a great treat, then you get the vibrant color. Very cool.

So I do like Jean Seberg. I only have one other film from her, Lilith. I might be that one Spanish Giallo film. You know me, got to watch Giallo films.

[Breathless Trailer / Bonjour Tristesse Clip]

BONUS FILM: Dolemite Is My Name from 2019 (Director: Craig Brewer, Writers: Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski, Stars: Eddie Murphy, Cinematography: Eric Steelberg, Runtime: 118 mins)

Earlier this year I watched Dolemite. One of the classic blaxploitation films. Three reasons for this one. First, it was Black History Month (was it?). Second was that I knew it was an oft cited classic of its subgenre. Finally, for this film. I liked this film more than Dolemite. This movie about Rudy Ray Moore rise from failed entertainer to leading his film is an entertain film that just feels good.

Dolemite Is My Name tracks Rudy as he struggles. He has not made it as a singer and is working as an MC. He takes some old rhyming proclamations and name Dolemite from a homeless man then stretches it i to a comedy routine. He becomes an underground success, then a billboard success. Travels, helps along one Lady Reed into becoming her own comedy star. Eventually decides to make a film where he puts his savings on the line, and wagers his comedy catalog with his studio putting up financing. A film no one wants to distribute until sold out independent showings score big.

Eddie Murphy is really good. Rudy is a pretty relatable guy, just trying to accomplish his goal of being a performer. Of being a star. Ultimately trying to prove his father wrong. Its not really dug into but the little gems we get show Rudy resents his fathers dismissal of him as a child. Da’Vine Joy Randolph is fantastic as Lady Reed, a woman who Rudy pushes to become a performer. Their first scene together is gold. Her support of Rudy’s efforts is heart warming. Wesley Snipes plays D’Urville Martin, an actor who is lured into the film with the opportunity to be the director. He is high, over the whole production, and its amusing to see Snipes reaction to everything in Rudy’s film. The cast is filled out nicely with great character actors too.

This film has been compared to the Disaster Artist and Ed Wood, I have only seen Ed Wood. I think I like this better than Ed Wood. While Ed Wood is a better put together film from a technical standpoint, I think this one is more likeable. Both are important movies about people making art.

[Trailer]

RITA HAYWORTH DOUBLE FEATURE: December 5th-You Were Never Lovelier from 1942 (Director: William A. Seiter, Writers: various, Stars: Fred Astaire and Rita Hayworth, Cinematography: Ted Tetzlaff, Runtime: 97 mins)

Cover Girl from 1944 (Director: Charles Vidor, Writers: various, Stars: Rita Hayworth and Gene Kelly, Cinematography: Allen M. Davey and Rudolph Maté, Runtime: 107 mins)

Rita Hayworth is one of the most famous golden age Hollywood starlets. Her visage is iconic among lovers of old cinema. She was many times portrayed as a woman that men (usually the male lead) fell over themselves for. While Rita never won an oscar, or may never been nominated, she did fool people into believing she loved her job. Rita hated Hollywood, wanted to get out but was sort of forced into the industry and had to keep working. Her smile betrays her truth. Knowing her story it makes her performances something else.

You Were Never Lovelier and Cover Girl present her in a slightly different way than the other films. While men fawn over her, the film structures are a little closer to traditional romcoms. Plus more dancing and singing. The men are not really obsessing over her like other films. She is not needling them. Not playing a gold digger looking for advancement. Not to say either are my favorites of hers. Strawberry Blonde is, and I have to rewatch Gilda sometime.

You Were Never Lovelier has a bit of the ice princess (but not really) and romantic mix up. Fred Astaire is trying to get a job dancing for this rich guy who is trying to find a way to get his second daughter married. To who? Well, right now he just tricking her with letters. Yes, creepy. Things bring the two together and they have fine chemistry. The dancing is good, not up to the Astaire/Rogers films. Though I kind of like this better because of the plot. Its amusing, good old film.

Cover Girl plot is weaker, with Rita’s character becoming a popular model driving business to a small theater where she performs. Her boyfriend (I guess) is struggling with her new fame while the modeling company wants more with her. The modeling company boss was in love with Rita’s grandmother, played by Rita Hayworth. While a weak plot I liked the dancing better. Gene Kelley has a fantastic number. Also, glorious technicolor. I would put it about the same as You Were Never Lovelier.

Good films. Rita is beautiful, and deserved better.

[You Were Never Lovelier Trailer / Cover Girl Song & Dance Number]

December 6th-The Bone Collector from 1999 (Director: Philip Noyce, Writers: Jeremy Iacone and Based on the novel by Jeffery Deaver, Stars: Denzel Washington and Angelina Jolie, Cinematography: Dean Semler, Runtime: 118 mins)

A film with a bunch of actors far beyond the material. Still, okay way to kill two hours.

[Trailer]

December 7th-Secret Six from 1931 (Director: George W. Hill, Writer: Frances Marion, Stars: Wallace Berry, Lewis Stone, John Mack Brown, Jean Harlow, Clark Gable, Marjorie Rambeau and Ralph Bellamy, Cinematography: Harold Wenstrom, Runtime: 83 mins)

Another pre-code gangster film. This one has Wallace Beery rising up the ranks to be a big shot gangster. He works for a corrupt lawyer who has his own racket going. Film features early performances from Ralph Bellamy and more famously, early performances from Clark Gable and Jean Harlow. Harlow would appear in the much more famous The Public Enemy, just the week after Secret Six. Also a uncredited “cameo” in Scarface.

Okay, Wallace Beery’s Scorpio is one of the least interesting of all the gangsters I have seen. Ralph Bellamy looks intimidating at first but really feels miscast. It is unfortunate. However Gable is smooth in the film, Harlow is still not quite there. She shows flourishes of the actress she would become here (and some others) but its not really until Red Headed Woman, and working with people like writer Anita Loos or director Victor Fleming did she really soar.

Visually the film looks pretty good. Some nice action. However it does not hold a candle to some of the other gangster films of the time. This was not MGMs wheelhouse. Anyway, yeah…

[Clip]

BONUS: Frozen 2 from 2019 (Director: Chris Buck and Jennifer Lee, Writers: Jennifer Lee with Story by several people, Stars: Kristen Bell, Idina Menzel, Josh Gad, Jonathan Groff, and Ciarán Hinds, Cinematography: Tracy Scott Beattie on layouts and Mohit Kallianpur on lighting, Runtime: 103 mins)

Why don’t they just give the lesbian a girlfriend?

Anyway, more singing and better visuals then the first, weaker story. Overall a good film if predictable at points. I don’t like Olaf but the kids in the theater were laughing. So it all worked.

[Trailer]

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30 Days of Film in November-Links, Rankings, & Stats

I tried to watch less films this month and still watched quite a bit. Based on the average film score, it was a good month. But to be fair, most months score about the same amount. I will say this one had a great start and fantastic finish. Just realized that my analytics did not save last time I edited this so my overall score is gone… got to fix that.

Top 10 for November
1. The Best Years of Our Lives
2. Knives Out
3. My Young Auntie
4. Sudden Death
5. One Armed Swordsman
6. Yojimbo
7. Palm Beach Story
8. The Sound of Music
9. JCVD
10. Charlie’s Angels (2019) or Dance, Girl, Dance (1940)

Worst Film For November
No film under 2 stars

Films Watched
45 Total
33 New
12 Rewatch

Average Star Rating Based On My Letterboxd Ratings: 3.11 out of 5

November Weekly Reviews
Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Week 4

Letterboxd|Twitter|Instagram

Previous Months Links, Rankings & Stats
January, February, March, April, June, July, August, September, October

By The Numbers
This Is An Incomplete List
All Names Are Actors Unless Otherwise Noted
Includes Archival Footage-Clips of a film with an actor were used in another film. For example, James Cagney movie plays in Fade to Black and are used as story elements in Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid.

Twenty-Three Films: Edith Head (Costume/Wardrobe), Cedric Ribbons (Production Design)

Twenty One Films: Bess Flowers (Queen of Extras),

Twenty Films: Alfred Hitchcock (Master of Suspense),

Sixteen Films: Franz Waxman (Composer),

Fifteen Films: Adrian (Costume/Wardrobe), Humphrey Bogart (Includes Archival Footage), Cary Grant (Includes Archival Footage), Jean Harlow,

Fourteen Films: Lyle R. Wheeler (Production Design)

Thirteen Films: Mel Berns (Make-Up), Perc Westmore (Make-Up), Wally Westmore (Make-Up),

Eleven Films: Joan Crawford (Includes Archival Footage),

Ten Films: Roger Corman (Director/Actor), Ben Hecht (Writer), Eugene Joseff (Costume/Wardrobe), Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Cyril J. Mockride (Composer), Jack P. Pierce (Make-Up), Max Steiner (Composer), James Stewart,

Nine Films: Irene (Costume/Wardrobe), Orry-Kelly (Costume/Wardrobe), Mario Bava (Director/Writer/Cinematography), Ward Bond, John Carradine, Clark Gable, Howard Hawks (Director), Carole Lombard, Bert Moorhouse, Vincent Price (Includes Archival Footage),

Eight Films: Gino Corrado, Henry Fonda, Stephen King (Novelist), Michael Mark, Dick Miller, Alfred Newman (Composer), Hal Pereira (Production Design), Van Nest Polglase (Production Design), Harold Rosson (Cinematographer), Arthur Tovey, Vera West (Costume/Wardrobe), Billy Wilder (Director/Writer),

Seven Films: Lionell Atwill, Lucien Ballard (Cinematographer), James Cagney (Including Archival Footage), Leo G. Carroll, Jack Carson, Carroll Clark (Production Design), Bette Davis (Includes Archival Footage), Arthur Edeson (Cinematography), Jules Furthman (Writer), Peter Lorre, Frank McLure, Ben Nye (Make-Up), John Qualan, Miklos Rozsa (Composer), Jean Claude Van Damme, Roy Webb (Composer),

Six Films: Edward Arnold (Includes Archival Footage), Mary Astor, William Bendix, Wade Boteler, Walter Brennan, Robert Burks (Cinematography), Louis Calhern, Lon Chaney Jr., Spencer Charters, Elisha Cook Jr, Jack Dawn (Make-Up), William Demarest, Pat Flaherty, Hugo Friedhofer (Composer), Charles D. Hall (Production Design), Porter Hall, Charles Halton, Theresa Harris, James Wong Howe (Cinematography), John Huston (Director/Writer), George Kennedy, Colin Kenny, Ted J. Kent (Editor), Charles Lane, Charles Lang (Cinematographer), Fritz Lang (Director/Writer), Doris Lloyd, Daniel Mandell (Editor), Hattie McDaniel, Una Merkal, Ray Milland (Includes Archival Footage), Marilyn Monroe, Franklin Pangborn, Gregory Peck, Edgar Allan Poe (Writer/Inspiration), Heinz Roemheld (Composer), Dorothy Spencer (Editor), Barbara Steele, Bert Stevens, Frank Sullivan (Editor), Gene Tierney, Spencer Tracy, Norma Varden, Joseph Walker (Cinematography),

Five Films: Wesley Addy, Dana Andrews, Gertrude Astor, William Axt (Composer), Lauren Bacall, Irving Bacon, Martin Balsam, Ralph Bellamy, William Benedict, Charles Bennett (Writer), George Chandler, Charles Coburn, Jimmy Conlin, Jack Conway (Director), Harry Cording, Jeff Corey, George Cukor (Director), Marcel Dailo, Ann Doran, George J. Folsey (Cinematography), Stuart Freeborn (Make-Up), Dwight Frye, Lee Garmes (Cinematography), Steven Geray, Charley Grapwin, Ernest Haller (Cinematography), Harry Hayden, Katherine Hepburn, Holmes Herbert, Bernard Herrmann (Composer), Edward Everett Horton, James Wong Howe (Cinematography), Henry Jones (Archival Footage Included), Isabel Jewell, Ray June (Cinematography), Roscoe Karns, Alan Ladd (Includes Archival Footage), Veronica Lake (Includes Archival Footage), Charles Laughton (Actor/Director/Includes Archival Footage), John Leopold (Composer), John Litel, Arthur Loft, Myrna Loy, Anita Loos (Writer), Jean Louis (Costume/Wardrobe), Ernst Lubitsch (Director), Barton MacLane, John Lee Mahin (Writer), Rudolph Maté (Cinematography/Director), Edwin Maxwell, Matt McHugh, Torben Meyer, Robert Mitchum, Barboura Morris, Alan Mowbray, Nicholas Musuraca (Cinematography), Robert Emmett O’Connor, Una O’Connor, Moroni Olsen, Garry Owen, Eugene Pallette, Nat Pendleton, Sol Polito (Cinematography), Claude Rains, George Robinson (Cinematography), Sig Ruman, Jeff Sayre, Arthur P. Schmidt (Editor), John F. Seitz (Editor), Sylvia Sidney, Jo Swerling (Writer), Ted Tetzlaff (Cinematography), Dimitri Tiomkin (Composer), George Tomasini (Editor), Fred ‘Snowflake’ Toones, Jacques Tourneur (Director), Geoffrey Unsworth (Cinematography), Robert Warwick, James Whale (Director), John Williams (The Actor Not The Composer), Chill Wills, Robert Wise (Director/Editor/Sound Design),

Four Films: Frank Albertson, Murray Alper, Morris Ankrum, Dario Argento (Director/Writer), Colleen Atwood (Costume/Wardrobe), Stuart Baird (Editor), George Bassman (Composer), John Barry (Composer), Gordon Bau (Make-Up), Les Baxter (Composer), Ned Beatty, Louis Beavers, Brooks Benedict, Ingrid Bergman, Charles Bernstein (Composer), Billy Bevan, Clara Blandick, Joan Blondell, Eric Blore, Beaulah Bondi, Marlon Brando, Egon Brecher, Charles Bronson, W.R. Burnett (Writer), Frank Capra (Director), EE Clive, Claudette Colbert, Joyce Compton, Gary Cooper, Alec Craig, Laird Cregar, Floyd Crosby (Cinematography), Jack Curtis, Jane Darwell, Richard Deacon, Adolph Deutsch (Composer), IAL Diamond (Writer), Robert Di Niro, Jean Dixon, Ruth Donnelly, Jay Dratler (Writer), Frank Ferguson, Victor Fleming (Director), Wallace Ford, Lance Fuller, Jeff Goldblum, Mary Gordon, Lawrence Grant, Robert Grieg, Charles B. Griffith (Writer), Moses Gunn, Sam Harris, Joan Harrison (Writer), Forrester Harvey, Paul Harvey, Gene Havlick (Editor), Audrey Hepburn, William Holden, John Hoyt, Olaf Hytten, Samuel L. Jackson, Fred J. Koenekamp (Cinematography), Norman Krasna (Writer), Milton Krasner (Cinematography), Stanley Kubrick (Director/Writer/Producer), Elsa Lanchester, Joseph LaShelle (Cinematography), Ernest Laszlo (Cinematography), Charles Lederer (Writer), Ernest Lehman (Writer), William Levanway (Editor), Dolph Lundgren, Ida Lupino, Joseph MacDonald (Cinematography), Fred MacMurray (Includes Archival Footage), Owen Marks (Editor), Mae Marsh, Strother Martin, Raymond Massey, Joel McCrea, Roddy McDowall, Russell Metty (Cinematographer), Vicente Minnelli (Director), Thomas Mitchell, Ennio Morricone (Composer), Lionel Newman (Composer), Daria Nicolodi, Edmond O’Brien, Robert Emmett O’Connor, Reginald Owen, Jack Palance, Inez Palange, Lee Patrick, Dorothy Peterson, Tyrone Power, Merrill Pye (Production Design), George Raft, Ivan Rassimov, Gene Raymond, Ginger Rogers, Joseph Ruttenberg (Cinematography), Walter Sande, George Sanders, Mario Serandrei (Editor), Blanche Sewell (Editor), Leon Shamroy (Cinematography), Ann Sheridan, Curt Siodmark (Writer), Frank Skinner (Composer), Howard St. John, Larry Steers, Harry Stradling Sr. (Cinematography), Preston Sturges (Director/Writer), Ubaldo Terzano (Cinematography), Gregg Toland (Cinematography), Franchot Tone, Robert Townsend, Joseph A. Valentine (Cinematography), Ellinor Vanderveer, H.B. Warner, Paul Weatherwax (Editor), Richard Webb, Ferris Webster (Editor), Bud Westmore (Make-Up), Larry Wheat, Richard Widmark, Florence Wix, Will Wright, Kennan Wynn, Nedrick Young, Victor Young (Composer),

Three Films: Dorothy Adams, Robert Aldrich (Director), Henri Alekan, Eddie ‘Rochester’ Anderson, Richard Anderson, George Axelrod (Writer), Fay Bainter, Lucille Ball, Bobby Barber, George Barbier, Don Barclay, George Barnes (Cinematograhy), Harry Barris, Billy Barty, Louise Beavers, Lionel Belmore, Gregg Berger, Elmer Bernstein (Composer), Whit Bissell, Oliver Blake, Monte Blue, Sammy Blum, Charles Brackett, Neville Brand, Al Bridge, Clarence Brown, Robert Brown, Sidney Buchman (Writer), Frederick Burton, Spring Byington, Frank Cady, James M. Cain (Writer), Leonard Carey, Milton Carruth (Editor), Walter Catlett, Nora Cecil, Raymond Chandler (Novelist/Screenwriter), Don Cheadle, Candy Clark, James B. Clark (Editor), Matt Clark, Wallis Clark, Mae Clarke, Dora Clement, Ruth Clifford, Chester Clute, Tony Curtis, David Clyde, Emmett Cogan, Ray Collins, Chester Conklin, Sean Connery, Frank Conroy, Albert Conti, Maurice Costello, Joseph Cotton, Hazel Court, Jack E. Cox (Cinematohraphy), John Cromwell (Director), Hume Cronyn, Jamie Lee Curtis, Michael Curtiz (Director), Henry Daniell, Harry Davenport, Anthony Dawson, Doris Day, Ted De Corsia, Olivia De Havilland, Gustavo De Nardo, Frank De Vol (Composer), Harry Depp, William Demarest, Bruce Dern, Eddie Dew, Marlene Dietrich, Jean Dixon, Richard Donner (Director), Kirk Douglas (Includes Archival Footage), Melvyn Douglas, Elspeth Dudgeon, George Duning (Composer), Julius and Philip Epstein (Writer), Leif Erickson, Edith Evanson, Tom Ewell, Antonio Fargas, Don Fellows, Giancarlo Ferrando (Conematography), Charles Fleischer, Ian Fleming (Novelist), Rhonda Fleming, John Ford (Director), Hugh S. Fowler (Editor), Franco Fraticelli (Editor), Paul Frees, Beverly Garland, Judy Garland, Oliver H.P. Garrett (Writer), Ernesto Gastaldi (Writer), John George, Stuart Gilmore (Editor), James Gleason, Charles Gross Jr. (Editor), Clu Gulager, Jean Hagen, Jonathon Hale, Murray Hamilton, Mark Hanna (Writer), Russell Harlan (Cinematography), Hugo Hass (Director/Writer/Actor), Sterling Hayden, John Michael Hayes (Writer), Patrica Hayes, Rita Hayworth, Jonathan Haze, John Heldabrand, Fay Helm, Darryl Hickman, Howard C. Hickman, Sidney Hickox (Cinematography), Jack Hill (Director), Leyand Hodgson, Edmund Holding (Writer and Director), Friedrich Hollaender (Composer), Miriam Hopkins, John Houseman, Olin Howland, Brandon Hurst, Walter Huston, Warren Hymer, Howard Jackson (Composer), Maurice Jarre (Composer), Scarlett Johansson, Russell Johnson, Carolyn Jones, Victor Julian, Mary Gordon, Roy Gordon, Garson Kanin, Elia Kazan (Director), Brian Keith, Barry Kelley, Mike Kellin, Grace Kelly, Tom Kennedy, June Kenney, Erle C. Kenton (Director), Hal C. Kern (Editor), Donald Kerr, Guy Kibbee, Margot Kidder, Henry Kolker, Alma Kruger, Philip H. Lathrop (Cinematography), Marc Lawrence, Richard Lawson, Christopher Lee (with Archive footage), Jack Lemmon, Anna Lee, Louis Levy (Composer), Gene Lockhart, Louis R. Loeffler (Editor), Lionel London (Cinematography), Herbert Lom, Ray Lovejoy (Editor), Otho Lovering (Editor), Michael Luciano (Editor), George Lynn, Donald MacBride, John McGiver, Matty Malneck (Composer), Marjorie Main, Hank Mann, Hugh Marlowe, Grouco Marx, Lois Maxwell, Mike Mazurki, Butterfly McQueen, Edward McWade, Harriet Medin, Beryl Mercer, John J. Mescall (Cinematography), John Miljin, Hayley Mills, Victor Milner (Cinematography), Grant Mitchell, Jack Montgomery, Cleo Moore, Andre Morell, Frank Morgan, Adrian Morris, Charles R. Moore, J. Carroll Nash, Noel Neil, William Newell, Alfred Newman (Composer), Bruno Nicolai (Composer), Roberto Nicolosi (Composer), Alex North (Composer), Edgar Norton, Pat O’Brien, Frank Orth, Maria Ouspenskaya, Rick Overton, Anthony Perkins, Nehemiah Persoff, Luciano Pigozzi, Franz Planer (Cinematography), Donald Pleasence, Christopher Plummer, John Posey, William Powell, Andre Previn (Composer), Denver Pyle, Gregory Ratoff, John Ratzenberger, Leoda Richards, John Ridgely, Massimo Righi, Thelma Ritter, Roy Roberts, William Roberts (Writer), Hugh A. Robertson (Editor), May Robson, Howard Emmett Rogers (Writer), Donald R. Rondell, Hayden Rorke, Richard Roundtree, Deep Roy, Mark Ruffalo, Kurt Russell, Carlo Rustichelli, Tim Ryan, Waldo Salt (Writer), Hans J. Salter (Composer), Erskine Sanford, Telly Savalas, Joe Sawyer, Sauro Scavolini (Writer), Palo Schifrin (Composer), Lizabeth Scott, Ralph Von Seyffertitz, Dan Seymour, Anita Sharp-Bolster, Jack Sholder (Director/Editor), Henry Silva, Jay Silverheels, Russell Simpson, C. Aubrey Smith, Terrance Stamp, Wyndham Standing, Barbara Stanwyck (Includes Archival Footage), Ronald Stein (Composer), Henry Stephenson, George Stevens (Director), Donald Ogden Stewart (Writer), Patrick Stewart, George E. Stone, Harold J. Stone, Lewis Stone, Herbert Stothart (Composer), Glenn Strange, Woody Strode, Donald Sutherland, Julius Tannen, Regis Toomey, Leo Tover (Cinematography), Arthur Tovey, Henry Travers, Burnell Tucker, Dalton Trumbo (Writer), Brian Tyler (Composer), Alida Valli, John Vernon (includes Archival Footage), Bruno VeSota (Actor/Writer), Walter Walker, Raoul Walsh (Director), Edward Ward (Composer), Rachel Ward, John Wayne, Damon Waynes, Mel Welles, Pat West, O.Z. Whitehead, Ian Wolfe, John Wray, William Wyler, Christopher Young (Composer), Robert Young,

Two Films: Ann-Margret, Walter Abel, Enrique Acosta, Eddie Acuff, Brooke Adams, Eddie Albert, John Alcott (Cinematography), Fred Aldrich, Maxine Alexandre (Cinematography), Nancy Allen, Leon Ames, Arthur Anderson, Mary Anderson, Judith Anderson, Stanley Andrews, Heather Angel, Edward Anhalt (Writer), Evelyn Ankers, George Antheil (Composer), Maurice Argent, Arthur A. Arling (Cinematography), Jean Arthur, Dorothy Arzner (Director), Fred Astaire, Roscoe Ates, Edith Atwater, Leah Ayers, Lew Ayres, Diane Baker, Lynn Baggett, Raymond Bailey, Ann Bancroft, George Bancroft, (Cinematography), Elizabeth Banks (Actor/Director/Writer), Lionel Barrymore, Walter Bason, George Barton, Jacob Batalon, Tyler Bates (Composer), Hubert Bath (Composer), L. Frank Baum (Novelist), David Baxt, Barbara Bel Geddes, Hank Bell, James Bell, Robert Benchley, Robert Russell Bennet (Composer), Sally Benson (Writer), Henry Berman (Editor), Clem Bevans, Roger Beverly, Lynette Bernay, Alberto Bevilacqua (Writer), Kent Beyda (Editor), A.I. Bezzerides (writer), Ted Billings Peter Billingsley, Herman Bing, Ole Bratt Birkeland (Writer), Joseph F. Biroc (Cinematography), Larry J. Blake, Ronee Blakely, George Boemler (Editor), Rudy Bond, Beaulah Bondi, Ernest Borgnine, Willis Bouchey, Matthew Boulton, George Bowler (Editor), George Bowers (Editor), Lovyss Bradly, Leigh Brackett (writer), Charles Bradshaw (Composer), Elwood Bredell (Cinematography), George Brent, Helen Broderick, Norbert Brodine (Cinematography), Adam Brody, James Brolin, Hilary Brooke, Barbara Brown, Charles D. Brown, Peter Brown, Tod Browning (Director), Mae Bruce, Nigel Bruce, Horst Buchholz, Jan Buckingham, Victor Buono, Billie Burke, Joe Burke, Raymond Burr, Norman Burton, Tony Burton, Francis X. Bushman Jr., W.R. Burnett (Writer), Tim Burton (Director/Art Design), David Buttolph (Composer), Stephen H. Burum (Cinematographer), Dan Butler, James Caan, Susan Cabot, Charles Cane, Truman Capote (Writer), Hoagy Carmichael, Morris Carnovsky, Jack Carr, Anthony Carras (Editor), Lynn Cartwright, Antony Caruso, Bernie Casey, Agatha Christie (Novelist/Stage Writer), Claire Carleton, John Carpenter (Director/Writer/Composer/Editor), Maeline Carroll, Frances Carson, Bernie Casey, Wheaton Chamers, George Chandler, Lita Chevret, Ken Christy, Eduardo Ciannelli, Al Clark (Editor), Bob Clark (Director/Writer), James B. Clark (Editor), Marlene Clark, Mae Clarke, John Cleese, Colin Clive, Anne V. Coates (Editor), James Coburn, Lenore J. Coffee, Larry Cohen (Director/Writer), Tom Coleman, Heine Conklin, Walter Connolly, Russ Conway, Tom Conway, Elisha Cook Jr., Charles Cooper, Jeane Cooper, Melville Cooper, Maxine Cooper, Tex Cooper, Ellen Corby, Wendell Corey, Mariclae Costello, Jospeh Cotton, Jerome Cowan, Brian Cox, Tony Cox, David Cronenberg (Director/Actor), Edward Cronjager (Cinematography), Jerome Cowen, Robert Cummings, Peggy Cummins, Edward Curtis, Sidney Cutner (Composer), Charles Cyphers, Howard Da Silva, Mark Dacascos, Willen Dafoe, William H. Daniels (Cinematography), Royal Dano, Sonia Darrin, Linda Darnell, William B. Davidson, William Davis, Laraine Day, Jean De Briac, Robert De Grasse (Cinematography), Jules Dassin (Director), Andre De Toth, Rob Delaney, Viña Delmar (Writer), Nick Dennis, Reginald Denny, Andy Devine, Brad Dextor, Khigh Dhiegh, Dante DiPaolo, Dick Dickinson, Arturo Dominici, Pino Donaggio (Composer), Sarah Douglas, Doris Dowling, Cathy Downs, Robert Downey Jr., Betsy Drake (Actor/Writer), Bob Ducsay (Editor), Howard Duff, Tommy Duggan, Margaret Dumont, Faye Dunaway, Emma Dunn, Dan Duryea, Michael J. Duthie (Editor), Robert Duvall, Shelley Duvall, Clint Eastwood, James Edwards, Robert S. Eisen (Editor), Jack Elam, James Ellison, John Emery, Fern Emmett, Estelle Etterre, Chris Evans, Rex Evans, Francis Edward Faragoh (Writer), Dennis Farina, William Faulkner (Writer), Nat Faxon, Adrienne Fazan (Editor), Rudi Fehr (Editor), Edwige Fenech, Gabriele Ferzetti, Verna Fields (Editor), Steve Fisher (Writer), Barry Fitzgerald, Paul Fix, Joe Flood, Elizabeth Flourney, George J. Foley (Cinematography), Marcello Fondato (Writer), Joan Fontaine, Luis Forbes (Composer), Francis Ford, Gleen Ford, Robert Forster, Romana Fortini (Editor), Byron Foulger, Almeda Fowler, Scott Frank (Writer), Benjamin Franke (Composer), Christopher Franke (Composer), John Frankenheimer (Director), Bert Freed, Helen Freeman, Charles Frend (Editor), Gerald Fried (Composer), Edward Furlong, Reginald Gardiner, Edward Gargan, Tay Garnett (Director), John Gavin, Gladys George, Merritt B. Gerstad (Cinematography), Frank Gerstle, John Gieguld, Billy Gilbert, Tom Gilmore, Vaughan Glaser, Scott Glenn, Willis Goldbeck (Writer), Mark Goldblatt (Editor), Jerry Goldsmith (Composer), Lisa Golm, Minna Gomball, Eiza Gonzalez, Gavin Gordon, Walter Gotell, David Goyer (Writer), Gloria Grahme, Colleen Gray, Jack Dylan Grazer, Clarence Greene (Writer), Sydney Greenstreet, James Gregory, Pam Grier, Kathy Griffin, Harry Guardino, Burnett Guffey (Cinematography), Edmind Gwenn, Jake Gyllenhaal, Greta Gynt, Robert Haines, Alan Hale, Victor Halperin (Director), Margaret Hamilton, William Hamilton (Editor), Dashiel Hammett (Novelist), Nicholas Hammond, Cedric Hardwicke, Lumsden Hare, Leigh Harline (Composer), Rand Harper, Marilyn Harris, Henry Hathaway (Director), Rutger Hauer, Martha Hayer, Allison Hayes, Margaret Hayes, David Hemmings, Lance Henrickson, Michael Herz (Director), Remy Hii, Walter Hill (Director/Writer), Brent Hinkley, Hsiao Ho, Monckton Hodge (Writer), Samuel Hoffenstein, Tom Holland (Director/Writer), Judy Holliday, John Hollis, Celeste Holm, Jack Holt, Tim Holt, Mark Holton, Oskar Homolka, James Horner (Composer), Djimon Hounsou, Leslie Howard, Ron Howard (Director/Actor), Rochelle Hudson, Rock Hudson, Ken Hughes (Director), Frank E. Hull (Editor), Henry Hull, Alan Hume (Cinematography), Holly Hunter, Paul Hurst, Leila Hyams, Peter Hyams (Cinemtography/Director), Rex Ingram, Michael Ironside, Robert Ito, Paul Ivano (Cinematography), Brion James, Gladden James, Allen Jenkins, Elton John (Singer/Actor), Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Nunnally Johnson (Writer), Dean Jones, Freddie Jones, Grace Jones, Darwin Joston, Lampros Kalfuntzos, MacKinley Kantor (Writer), Bronislau Kaper (Composer), Lloyd Kaufman (Director/Writer), Bernhard Kaun (Composer), Edward Keane, Michael Keaton, Cecil Kellaway, Nancy Kelly (Archival Footage Included), Arthur Kennedy, Ken Kercheval, Charles Kevin (Composer), Evelyn Keyes, Gary B. Kibbe (Cinematography), Udo Kier, Patrick Kilpatrick, Aton Kincaid, Tony King, Leonid Kinsky, Werner Klemperer, Bernard Knowles (Cinematography), Patric Knowles, Clarence Kolb, Clarence Kolster (Editor), Rudolph G. Kopp (Composer), Carl Kress (Editor), Jack Kruschen, Sho Kosugi, Nancy Kyes, John La Mesurier, Hedy Lamarr, David Landau, Martin Landau, Priscilla Lane, Jessica Lange, Ring Lardner Jr., Bobby Larson, Sydney Lassick, John Latch, John Laurie, Piper Laurie, Gabriele Lavia, Viola Lawrence (Editor), William Leanway (Cinematography), Chris Lebenzon, James A. Lebovitz (Cinematographer), Raymond Lebotiz (Editor), Janet Leigh, Vivien Leigh, Virgina Leith, Kasi Lemmons, Richard LeParmentier, Joan Leslie, Benn W. Levy (Writer), Harry Lewis, Joseph H. Lewis (Director), Howard Lindsay (Writer), John Lithgow, Desmond Llewellyn, George Lloyd, Carol Locatell, Donal Logue, Frank Lovejoy, Warren Low, Edward T. Lowe Jr., Carl Lumbly, Sidney Lumet (Director), James Luisi, George Lynn, Derek Lyons, George Burr Macannan, Ranald MacDougall (Writer), Robert MacLeod, Ben Maddow, Michael Madsen, Richard Maibaum (Writer), Karl Malden, Marini Malfatti, Albert Maltz (Writer), Henry Mancini (Composer), Joseph L. Mankiewicz (Writer), Tom Mankiewicz (Writer), Jayne Mansfield, Frederic March, Richard Marcus, Antonio Margheriti (Director), Michael Mark, Jaeden Martell, Marino Mase, Jean Marsh, Oliver T. Marsh, Tully Marshall, Alphonse Martell, Helen Martin, Steve Martin (Actor/Writer), Arthur Martinelli (Cinematography), Lucien Martini (Writer), Sergio Martino (Director), Marx Bros (Chico and Harpo), John Mathieson (Cinematography), Victor Mature, James McAvoy, Kevin McCarthy, Marc McClure, Ted McCord (Cinematography), Patty McCormack (Archival Footage Included), Joel McCrea, Frances McDonald, John D. McDonald (Writer), Margaret McWade, James Kevin McGuinness (Writer), Edward Meade, Ben Mendelsohn, Heather Menzies, Gary Merrill, Thomas Middleditch, Toshiro Mifune, Vera Miles, Gene Milford (Editor), John Milius (Writer), Kristine Miller, David Miller (Director), Lee Miller, Howard M. Mitchell, Laurie Mitchell, John Mitchum, Hayao Miyazaki (Director/Writer), Dickie Moore, Juanita Moore, Victor Moore, Agnes Moorehead, Baboura Morris, Patricia Morrow, Michael Murphy, Clarence Muse, Reggie Nalder, Charles Napier, Howard Negley, Dorothy Neumann, Alfred Newman (Composer), David and Leslie Newman (Writers), Jack Nicholson, Leonard Nimoy, Marni Nixon, Kim Novak, Joseph Nussbaum (Composer), Christian Nyby (Editor), William H. O’Brien, Kevin O’Conner, Martha O’Driscoll, Jack O’Halloran, Maureen O’Hara, Ryan O’Neal, James E. Newcom (Editor), Ed O’Ross, Oscar O’Shea, Ben Oakland (Composer), Ken Olandt, Laurence Olivier, Merritt Olsen, Frank Otto, Riccardo Pallottini (Cinematography), Chris Pang, Dorothy Parker (Writer), Charles Paton, Elizabeth Patterson, Wolfgang Petersen, Otto Perminger (Director), Valerie Perrine, Frank V. Philips (Cinematography), Irving Pichel, Jack P. Pierce (Writer), Ania Pieroni, Edward Platt, Oscar Polk, Bill Pope (Cinematography), Albert Popwell, Victor Potel, Dick Powell, Dinny Powell, William Prince, Tilo Prücknker, Mario Puzzo (Writer), Anthony Quayle, Milo Quesdada, Eddie Quinlin, John Sayles (Writer), Stanley Shapiro (Writer), Giuliani Raffaelli, Umberto Raho, Tony Randall, Jane Randolph, John Randolph, Jean Ransome, Samson Raphaelson (Writer), Nicholas Ray (Director/Writer), Paula Raymond, Robert Redford, Manning Redwood, Alan Reed, Christopher Reeve, George Reeves, Frano Ressel, Alma Reville (Writer), Ryan Reynolds, Leoda Richards, Thomas Richards (Editor), Stanley Ridges, Shane Rimmer, Antonio Rinaldi (Cinematography), Elizabeth Risdon, Beatrice Roberts, Leona Roberts, Edward G. Robinson, Mark Robson (Writer), William Roerick, Clayton Rohner, Owen Roizman (Cinematography), Greg Roland (Cinematography), Lawernce Roman (Writer), Mickey Rooney, Harry Rosenthal, Angelo Rossitto, Ellyn Rosyln, Mickey Rourke, Russell Rouse (Writer), Charles Ruggles, Wesley Ruggles (Director), John Rusell, Rosalind Russell, Morrie Ryskind (Writer), Howard St. John, Chris Sarandon, John Saxon, William Schaller, Maximilian Schell, Lalo Schifrin (Composer), Russel F. Schoengarth (Editor), Joseph Schrank (Writer), George Segal, Lorenzo Semple Jr. (Writer), Mario Serendrei (Editor), Leo Shaken (Composer), Joan Shawlee, William Shea (Editor), Martin Sheen, Reginald Sheffield, Lawrence Sher (Cinematography), Ann Sheridan, Robert Sherwood, David Shire (Composer), Howard Shore (Composer), Tony Sibbald, Don Siegal (Actor/Director), Frank Sinatra, Carl Sklover, Tess Slesinger (Writer), Everett Sloane, Charles Martin Smith, Dan Snow, Drew Snyder, Vladimir Sokoloff, Suzanne Somers, Alberto Spagnoli (Cinematography), Ned Sparks, Dorothy Spencer (Editor), Douglas Spencer, Lionel Stander, Harry Dean Stanton, Sylvester Stallone, Benito Stefanelli, Rod Steiger, John Steinbeck (Writer), John Steiner, Naomi Stevens, Josef Von Sternberg (Director), Onslow Stevens, Paul Stewart, Ludwig Stössel, David Strathairn, Randy Stuart, Harry Stubbs, Grady Sutton, Seijun Suzuki (Director), Ben Taggert, Isao Tamagawa, Russ Tamblyn, Daniel Taradish (Writer), Ron Tarr, Frank Tashlin (Director and Writer), Ada and Arlene Tau, Dub Taylor, Libby Taylor, Samuel A. Taylor (Writer), Lewis Teague (Director), Fabio Testi, Harvey F. Thew (Writer), J. Lee Thompson (Director), Sven-Ole Thorsen, George Tobias, Marisa Tomei, Franchot Tone, John Tourette, William Tracy, Emerson Treacy, Clare Trevor, Lana Turner (Includes Archival Footage), Edgar G. Ulmer (Director/Production Design/Costumes), Brenda Vaccaro, Conrad Veidt, John Vernon (Archival Footage Included), Martha Vickers, Yvette Vickers, Henry Victor, Sidney Wagner (Cinematography), Raymond Walburn, Christopher Walken, Bill Walker, Robert Walker, Tracey Walter, Eli Wallach, Anthony Warde, David Warner, Ken Watanbe, Lucille Watson, Keenan Ivory Waynes (Actor, Writer, and/or Director), Clifton Webb, Ferris Webster (Editor), Paul Weigel, Tuesday Weld, David Weisberg (Editor), Orson Welles (Actor, Writer, Director), Mae West (Actor/Writer), James Westerfield, Bill Weston, Garnett Weston (Writer), Jesse White, Merrill G. White (Editor), Forest Whitiker, James Whitmore, Dame May Whitty, Patrick Whyte, Henry Wilcoxon, Harry J. Wild (Cinematography), Cornel Wilde, Hagar Wilde, Kathleen Wilhoite, John Williams (Composer), Rhys Williams, Robert Williams, Laureen Willoughby, Clarence Wilson, Marie Windsor, Robert Winkler, Isabel Withers, Googie Withers, Sam Wood (Director), Teresa Wright, Jane Wyman, Junkie XL (Composer), George Worthin Yates (Writer), Bolo Yeung, Clifton Young, Gig Young, Mary Young, Susannah York, William H. Zeigler, Carl Zittrer (Composer)

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30 Days of Film in November-Week 4

November 23rd-Palm Beach Story from Year (Director/Writer: Preston Sturges, Stars: Claudette Colbert, Joel McCrea, Mary Astor and Rudy Vallée, Cinematography: Victor Milner, Runtime: 88 mins)

Starting the week with a Preston Sturges screwball comedy classic. The film is about Tom and Geraldine “Gerry” Jeffers. A married couple who have hit hard times financially. When a eccentric millionaire gives Gerry money cause she’s pretty and so she pays off their debts. Her husband is upset and also confused she wants to leave. Gerry believes she is wrong for him. She runs off, hustles herself a cab ride to the train station and then hustles a ticked to Palm Beach. Along the way she meets another rich dude who falls for her. John D. Hackensaker III starts to woe her and then his sister shows up and tries wooing Tom Jeffers who is now posing as apt. McGlue. Obviously the Jeffers must reconciles but SURPRISE everyone wins at the end of this. spoiler?

The opening was a tad bit confusing but then made sense after the ending and I went back looked it over. Neat little bit to pay off at the end. The film starts flowing with Claudette Colbert who is pretty, charming and funny through out. I think Joel McCrea is is good to but not one of my favorite old school leading men, but I have only seen a few of his films. The pair are good together but they don’t have the same spark Colbert has with other leading men. McCrea may be too much of a straight man comedian type. Rudy Vallee is interesting as Hackensacker, a kind off strange rich man. Bringing a certain offbeat charm. His sister is played by the legend, Mary Astor. I don’t think I watched any comedies with her before this but she is effortlessly amusing and fun through out. its a shame she is only in the last half of the film.

The story is interesting in that you can telegraph how the film goes for the most part but still feels fresh. It’s the way the journey is laid out. Colbert’s train adventure is fascinating, McCrea posing as the brother and how he is handling the situation, the two scenes with the weinie king (giving Colbert money was funny, then dissing McCrea before helping him find his wife was funnier), and then that ending. Everything works by taking the tried and true formula then adding some twists. Adding oddball players.

One of the funner screwball films I have watched this year.

[Criterion Ad]

November 24th-Manhattan Melodrama from 1934 (Director: WS Van Dyke, Writers: Oliver H. P. Garrett and Joseph L. Mankiewicz with Story by Arthur Caesar, Stars: Clark Gable, William Powell, and Myrna Loy, Cinematography: James Wong Howe, Runtime: 93 mins)

Manhattan Melodrama has that classic crime story set up of two friends/brothers on two sides of the law. Unlike Angels With Dirty Faces, one is a lawyer rather than a priest. This one has Gables blackie playing the gangster and Powell playing DA Jim Wade. Myrna Loy plays the love interest who starts with Blackie gut falls for Wade. However no jealousy, Blackie supports his brother even if it will hurt him.

This film is famous for two things. First Powell and Loy on screen pairing. Second, it is the last film John Dillinger saw before being gunned down by the Feds. So was it a good final film? Yeah. Gable is good, Powell is good, Loy is good. I like Clark Gable, he is a likeable and charismatic performer but he usually is not asked to do much but bring the Gable charm. Or the Gable coldness. But he is great at it. I have seen less Powell and Loy but I prefer Powell in comedies more than dramas but I think he is very good here. Especially the last act. I wish Loy had more to do, but for what she is asked to do I think she is fine.

Story wise, I think they went a little hard on the tragedy of the kids growing up. Not a lot of actual real tough gangster portions of the film. Gable doesn’t really nail the criminal swagger of a James Cagney but its MGM so I don’t think they would want that. Still, its a quick and lively film and has a good look to it. Its a very good film, but Angels with Dirty Faces is the better movie in this sort of crime film trope.

[Trailer]

Scarface from 1932 (Director: Howard Hawks, Writers: Ben Hecht with multiple others and Based on book by Armitage Trail, Stars: Paul Muni, Ann Dvorak, George Raft and Boris Karloff, Cinematography: Lee Garmes and L.W. O’Connell, Runtime: 95 mins)

Scarface is one of those classic gangster films that tracks the rise and fall of its main subject. Antonio “Tony” Camonte is that subject and we watch as he comes up in prohibition era Chicago. His relationships with his friends, family, and associates. Eventually his decisions and mistakes costing him dearly. Starring acclaimed Paul Muni, a young George Raft and a post Frankenstein Boris Karloff in a small role.

Howard Hawks is one hell of a director. While this is far from my favorite film from him it is a moody picture with beautiful photography from its cinematography team and great action. The line up murder (lifted from a real gangland murder) is beautiful done i all shadows. The set pieces look good and general mood is well done. I quite liked Ann Dvorak as the sister, thinking she was quite amazing. Raft has a charm to him for a pretty under written role. Paul Muni is… Interesting. I spent a lot of the film wondering how I feel about him and his performance. my first time seeing him.

Still, I don’t think the movie is for me and it might be because I fucking loved Public Enemy. I can see maybe that stylistically Scarface is a more interesting film, but I was far more engaged with Public Enemy. I shouldn’t compare the films but I find it hard not to. Ultimately I see this for what it means, and enjoyed it, but its not a favorite gangster film of the 30s.

[Trailer]

November 26th-Happy Birthday to Me from 1981 (Director: J. Lee Thompson, Writers: Timothy Bond, Peter Jobin and John Saxton, Stars: Melissa Sue Anderson and Glenn Ford, Cinematography: Miklos Lente, Runtime: 111 mins)

A 1981 slasher about a group of top students at a university being killed. One of the friends survived a near death experience and has repressed memories. A pretty competent and technical film at a time when most slashers looked cheap. I was half paying attention though and felt a little loss and I blame myself so I cut this one a bit of slack. Plus it had a few decent kills, pretty good set of performances, and overall was brought down by kind of a lousy script. But it feels different from slashers of the time and I appreciate that.

[Trailer]

November 27th-Boom Town from 1940 (Director: Jack Conway, Writers: John Lee Mahin and Based on A Lady Comes to Burkburnett in Cosmopolitan August 1939 edition by James Edward Grant, Stars: Clark Gable, Spencer Tracy, Claudette Colbert, and Hedy Lamarr, Cinematography: Harold Rosson, Runtime: 119 mins)

The night before Thanksgiving I watched this film about two men who go into the oil business together. Big John McMasters and Square John Sand. McMaster meets and marries Sands longtime love/crush Betsy. His concern for her starts a rift that both sides try to repair on and off through the years. There is a lot more ups and downs of bother their careers as the film goes on.

One of the first things of note is that this film is very impressive looking. A lot of the 30s and 40s films look like they were filmed on small sets. This one has a lot of scenes that feel on location, giv8ng it a larger feel. From the the scope of the town in the opening act, all the different oil places we see, to even watching John Sand hope off a train in a rail station this film feels very much a big piece. Jack Conway and his team provide a picture that is beautiful looking film.

Gable and Tracy are good together. Gable always has the charm and Tracy is very good. I really liked all their scenes together. I wish there was a little more with Claudette Colbert because when she shows up she is fantastic. Same with Hedy Lamarr who only gets to play the pretty other lady but knocks it out of the park. I think the problem is that the film lags after the first act and tries to put too much in. I runs the risk of being about two men fighting over a woman and luckily it doesn’t do that.

Overall, a really good film.

[Trailer]

November 28th-The Three Caballeros from 1944 (Director: A Lot, Writers: More Than There Are Directors On This Film, Stars: Donald Duck, Runtime: 71 mins)

I’ve had Disney Channel since I was a wee boy. So I watched anything on there when I had the living room to myself. So of course I seen The Three Caballeros and enjoyed it without knowing what they hell it was about. Now I am an adult and the film is… something. Its fun, a quick and amusing watch with good music. It was more fascinating as a child than as an adult but nostalgia means I give it a passing grade. Plus Donald Duck, the greatest performerof any generation. Behind Daffy.

[Trailer]

November 29th-That Darn Cat! from 1965 (Director: Robert Stevenson, Writers: Gordon & Mildred Gordon and Bill Walsh, Stars: Hayley Mills, Dean Jones, Dorothy Provine, Roddy McDowall, Neville Brand and Frank Gorshin, Cinematography: Edward Colman, Runtime: 116 mins)

The story of a cat that encounters a woman being held hostage by a pair of bank robbers. She switches his collar for her expandable wrist watch with an unfinished message on it. The cat, DC, arrives home and Patti is convinced it has to do with the recent bank robbery. She reports it to the FBI and they agree to have an agent follow the cat around. Then there is Patti’s sister, her suitor, Patti’s friend named Canoe, and the nosy neighbor. All causing some headaches through all this.

This silly little film is quite an enjoyable picture. Hayley Mills is, well, I am having a hard time think she is a good actress so much as a charismatic performer. The material is not asking for much here (or in the other two films I watched, though there is more heavy lifting in Parent Trap) but Hayley throws herself in. She has a good dynamic with Dorothy Provine who plays her sister, Dean Jones the FBI agent and… well, I don’t like Canoe. Why is the characters name Canoe? Why is he dressed like a 40 year old out of work slob? And the actors performance is annoying. As is Elsa Lanchesters annoying and nosy neighbor. God I hate that stock character. Back to Haley, Dean, Dorothy and a little bit of Roddy who are all having fun. I wish there was more with Frank Gorshin who is really restrained. Let the Riddler riddle god damn it!

Robert Stevensons film opens strong as we follow that Darn Cat and what a cat. An incredible performance from an animal ever. Best cat acting? The film zings along at a good pace but does struggle udner its run time, nearly 2 hours, after the middle but comes down strong in the last fifteen or so minutes. Liked the nosy neighbor getting arrested (her husband snitched) and Canoe getting stuck in a garage. Remove the weak parts and focus on the strong. Its a fun kids film. I really enjoyed it.

[Opening Sequence]

November 30th-Knives Out! from 2019 (Director/Writer: Rian Johnson, Stars: Daniel Craig, Chris Evans, Ana de Armas, Jamie Lee Curtis, Michael Shannon, Don Johnson, Toni Collette, Lakeith Stanfield, Katherine Langford, Jaeden Martell, and Christopher Plummer, Cinematography: Steve Yedlin, Runtime: 130 mins)

Fucking fantastic.

[Trailer]

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30 Days of Film in November-Week 3

GENE TIERNEY DOUBLE FEATURE: November 16th-The Wonderful Urge from 1948 (Director: Robert B. Sinclair, Writers: Jay Dratler, Stars: Tyrone Power and Gene Tierney, Cinematography: Charles G. Clarke, Runtime: 82 mins)

Where The Sidewalk Ends from 1950 (Director: Otto Preminger, Writers: Ben Hecht with Story by Victor Trivas, Frank P. Rosenberg, Robert E. Kent and Based on Night Cry by William L. Stuar, Stars: Dana Andrews and Gene Tierney, Cinematography: Joseph LaShelle, Runtime: 95 mins)

First we got a screwball comedy about a reporter named Thomas Jefferson Tyler he comes under the honesty of an heiress he is reporting on, but she finds out he was lying to her. o Sara Farley enacts a plan to pretend they are married to screw with him. They fall in love, obviously. In Where The Sidewalk Ends a tough cop starts investigating a murder. When he tracks down who he believes to be set up as a fall guy, a punch and bad fall kills this man. Now this cop-played by Dana Andrews, is in a rush to cover his tracks but when his boss thinks it was the father of the fall guys wife, he starts trying to figure a way out.

I think That Wonderful Urge has a good premise and some neat scenes and ideas, but ultimately does not work out. I think something might be off with the chemistry between the two leads who I generally like. However in this film I really prefer Gene Tierney. I find her pretty fun and fantastic as Sara Farley, especially when she screws over Tyone’s character when he decides on an impromptu marriage with his real girlfriend. She can turn on the charm and a second later let the facade of her story almost crack to get a touch of what her character is really feeling. Tyrone Power however, I think he’s solid and he has energy in scenes but I feel like the two leads are a little mismatched. A shame really, because I was enjoying this film for the most part.

Where The Sidewalk Ends is a very good noir film with Gene Tierney not getting a lot to do, sadly. She’s very good as the wife of the suspect turned murder victim and daughter of the next suspect. She and Dana have chemistry, but less here than in Laura which I rate about the same as this. Back to Tierney, she’s giving a lot for a performance that is under written and it reminds me that she is an underrated performer who was probably saddled in a company that did not have a lot for her. The studio system had its pros and cons and of the old Hollywood days, Fox had no solid identity. They did a little of everything and made a number of classics but were not to the level of MGM, nor Warner Brothers. Moving on to other performers, Dana Andrews is very good here but I can safely say The Best Years of Our Lives is my favorite performance by him, then followed by Laura. Karl Malden is very good as the police lieutenant. A very well rounded cast.

I think the story starts off good, hits a slow down point and has trouble ramping the action back to where it needs to be. however that first half is very engaging. From the way that opening credit sequence is shot to the gambling house segment, the start of the investigation to Dana Andrews character trying to dispose of the body. The tension with the lieutenant zeroes in on the wrong guy-all great stuff. Then it takes a break and while Dana and Gene are very good together, I think it just loses steam right there. Still, a quality film noir.

[That Wonderful Urge / Where The Sidewalk Ends Trailer]

November 17-Charlie’s Angels from 2019 (Director.Writer: Elizabeth Banks with Story by Evan Spiliotopoulos and David Auburn, Stars: Kristen Stewart, Naomi Scott, Ella Balinska, Elizabeth Banks, Djimon Hounsou, Sam Claflin, Noah Centineo and Patrick Stewart, Cinematography: Bill Pope, Runtime: 118 mins)

Elena, a scientist on a project called Calisto reaches out for help when her boss ignores dangers with the device. The Angels (Sabina and Jane) along with a Bosely (its a rank) go to investigate but are attacked by a hitman. That Bosely is killed, and now Elena, Sabina and Jane are working with another Bosely to secure the Calisto devices and see who sold them out. There are some twists and turns to it all, but with spy movies there has to be, right?

So as I type this the film is DOA at the box office and its a shame because this is a feel good, breezy, stupid fun action spy flick. yes there is a bit of cheesiness to it, and I shook my head but I smiled. It opens with Kristen Stewart being charming and then a quick take out of some guys. We establish Sabina and Jane, move on to meet Elena and set the story up. Firmly establishing her boss as the asshole. We get an understanding of the Angels and their structure. I actually like the idea of Bosely as a rank and all the different Angels there are. The story moves pretty quick and keeps moving, but enough time to breath and enjoying the characters. I liked for example their operation inside Elena’s place of business while trying to retrieve the Calisto devices. Them all dressed in a similar way as to one of the other employees and each operating with a specific task. Some fun movie spy craft stuff. Lots of fun movie spy craft.

Unlike some action films, it does not blow its load half way through. Third act action and wrap up is satisfying. The fight scene between Jane (played by Ella Balinska) and Hodak (Played by Jonathan Tucker) was very good. The action scene inside factory and the rock quarry in the center of the film is also quite an entertaining section. Overall the film has a pretty, smooth and slick look which works for the high fashion and style of Charlie’s Angels brand. It really should be playing more to the female audience but I wonder if a bad marketing plan has to do with it. I saw this film in spite of the trailer. I also want to mention how much I enjoy Chris Pang’s character fawning over Kristen Stewarts character. Too bad its doubtful there will be a sequel cause that would have been a great running joke.

Overall, damn this was a real fun film. You should check it out.

[Trailer]

JOAN CRAWFORD IN THE 30S DOUBLE FEATURE: November 18th-Sadie McKee from 1934 (Director: Clarence Brown, Writers: John Meehan and Based on “Pretty Sadie McKee” by Viña Delmar, Stars: Joan Crawford, Cinematography: Oliver T. Marsh, Runtime: 93 mins)

The Bride Wore Red from 1937 (Director: Dorothy Arzner, Writers: Lots, Stars: Joan Crawford, Franchot Tone, Robert Young and Billie Burke, Cinematography: George J. Folsey, Runtime: 103 mins)

I am writing this over a day later so the story details are fuzzy. Sadie McKee leaves her maid job because of how her employers spoke of the. an she loves. He ditches her for a job, she marries a rich guy and a lot more. Its about her relationships. Joan Crawford was good, story was interesting, however its pacing and developments never really pulled me past the thought ‘Its okay.’

I liked the Bride Wore Red better. Just a little better. A rich dude finances Joans characters rich two week vacation. Joan pretends to be a socialite (I don’t feel like checking) and live the high life. She wants to seduce away a rich man so she can maintain this new life. Franchot Tone plays the handsome postmaster of the local town she has feelings for. I think Joan once. ore is fantastic, Tone I find more interesting here than Sadie McKee. I think it has a more dynamic look and style to it. However I think I like my Joan Crawford films from the 50s and upward.

[Sadie McKee Trailer / The Bride Wore Red Clip]

November 19th-Riffraff from Year (Director: J. Walter Ruben, Writers: Frances Marion, Anita Loos, and H. W. Hannaford, Stars: Jean Harlow and Spencer Tracy, Cinematography: Ray June, Runtime: 94 mins)

Riffraff is about the relationship between Spencer Tracys character and Jean Harlows. He works for a fishing company and tries to be the big union man, she loves him even though he pisses her off. It tracks Spencers failings and struggles, hers to try to keep it together and ultimately stealing in an order to try and help him. Seriously what feels like some rom-com turns into a drama and has some interesting film choices.

I love Jean Harlow but I am basically left with her other films. The ones that are less talked about, not as fondly remembered. I still have Dinner at 8 but really thats it. I picked this one because of Harlow and Tracy in Libeled Lady which is way better than this. Both are good, specifically Harlow who can turn anger into lust with a twitch of her lip. She is fantastic. Tracy is good but this is not top tier Tracy by no means. No one else in the film really comes up as good, though Joseph Calleia does what he can with his character.

Story wise the tone shifts and changes I think hurt it to some degree. The good stuff comes and goes too much and we get either Harlow or Tracy usually performing with someone not really too interesting to watch. Also, unlike Hold Your Man where you root for Gable and Harlow together I don’t think Tracy’s Dutch deserves Harlow’s Hattie. I will say the film looks fine. Some good set pieces and what appears to be location shots. Its not a bad looking film. Its just this feels like a film only to see for Harlow.

[Clip]

November 20th-Danger: Diabolik from 1968 (Director: Mario Bava, Writers: Many and Based on Diabolik by Angela and Luciana Giussani, Stars: John Phillip Law, Marisa Mell and Michel Piccoli, Cinematography: Antonio Rinaldi, Runtime: 105 mins)

Danger: Diabolik is based on the Italian comic, a type of heighten crime book. A masked criminal takes on major heists and battles other underworld types. In this film Diabolik is pissing off the authorities and even bests members of a syndicate who try to play nice with the cops. Made around the same time as Barbarella, another Italian comic turned film by the same producers. Mario Bava, the horror film icon, tackles this film and despite his wonderful palette of colors, interesting set design, and some intriguing ideas crafts a rather boring film. Boring like Barbarella is boring but, I would argue, Barbarella is at least a little funner?

I think that’s all I got.

[Trailer]

November 21st-Dance, Girl, Dance from Year (Director: Dorthy Arzner, Writers: Vicki Baum, Frank Davis and Tess Slesinger, Stars: Maureen O’Hara, Louis Hayward and Lucille Ball, Cinematography: Russell Metty, Runtime: 90 mins)

Dance, Girl, Dance is about a pair of dancers played by Maureen O’ Hara (as Judy O’Brien) and Lucille Ball (as Bubbles aka Lily), a rich man and his troubled marriage, and a ballet impresario played by the underappreciated Ralph Bellamy. It tracks these two dancers who are something of frenemies/rivals. Bubbles is at times pretty mean to Judy but at the same time is helping her out. They each try getting to know the rich guy (James Harris Jr. played by Louis Hayward) but he is still not over his ex (played by Virginia Field). Ralph Bellamy’s character is fascinated by Judy who he meets by accident after she ditched the audition but they run into each other outside his business. Soon learns the talented dancer in Lily’s Burlesque show is the same one who wanted to audition. Lots of stuff going on.

This film is quite a picture. I understand why it has become a early feminist classic. While it does seem like it is built around two women going after the same rich man it really is about two working women and how they go about things to make money. Maureen’s Judy O’Brien does like the Jimmy character but also sees he is complicated, while Lucille’s Bubbles sees him as an out to working-though she is pretty successful as a burlesque dancer. Then there is the little bit with Virginia Field as the ex wife, who does love her former husband but both have issues that need to be resolved. Jimmy Harris is really a red herring in the story, and Ralph Bellamy’s Steve Adams is not the other love interest who wins, so much as the guy who could give Judy a shot who does. A man who wants to help a woman. He might be attracted to her, but Steve really comes off as a guy just trying to help. It is a pretty impressive story for 1940 and its directed by a woman with two female co-writers. Pretty impressive. The dialogue passes the Bechdel test, which was not a thing at the time and I’m sure many films would have failed at the time. Its a well handled film, with the dances being mostly impressive but I minus points for the blackface dancers. Luckily that’s short. Its also sad as there are some black people in the film, though they are background. … Still, its a simple looking movie that packs a lot of punch.

Maureen and Lucille are fantastic. Maureen is playing the good girl, and is damn fine at it. She has a sweetness and you really feel her struggle. She wants to dance, loves to dance, but she also has confidence issues. Lucille Ball is a bit of a bitch, but also more complicated. She helps Maureen’s Judy paying her overdue rent and also getting her a job. However she can be catty and takes pleasure in watching her fans boo Maureen at her shows. Both are great, and I really dug the night court scene. Louis Hayward gets second billing and while he’s fine, his character is just a red herring. He helps move plot elements forward and the reconciliation with his ex-wife is a great twist but neither are that great of characters. Important for the story but not fleshed out, but good performances. I dig Ralph Bellamy. I didn’t know much about hi until this year but this guy has been in a few important black (and black adjacent) comedies which are either classics or at least important things I saw growing up. Plus this year I got to see him in a few fascinating classics and I loved his part in My Girl Friday, even if I was not as moved by that film as others. Still good. Ralph is just such an amiable persona, so damn likeable and even if he plays he spurned love interest you still hope he lands on his feet. I liked him a lot for his rather small part because I believed he just wanted to help this woman.

Overall, a really cool film. Loved it.

[Catfight Scene]

CAROL LOMBARD DOUBLE FEATURE: November 21st-Twentieth Century from 1934 (Director: Howard Hawks, Writers: Lots, Stars: John Barrymore, Carole Lombard, Walter Connolly, Roscoe Karns, and Edgar Kennedy, Cinematography: Joseph H. August, Runtime: 91 mins)

Made for Each Other from 1939 (Director: John Cromwell, Writers: Rose Franken, Jo Swerling and Frank Ryan, Stars: Carole Lombard, James Stewart, and Charles Coburn, Cinematography: Leon Shamroy, Runtime: 92 mins)

I like Carol Lombard, but I don’t find a lot of her films memorable. Twentieth Century was good for her and John Barrymore. Made for Each Other was a disappointment. I have things to do so I am not in the mood to force myself to do a major write up for the last entry of the week.

[Twentieth Century Clip / Made For Each Other Trailer]

Posted in film, movies | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

30 Days of Film in November-Week 2

80s HONG KONG ACTION-COMEDY DOUBLE FEATURE: November 9th-My Young Auntie from 1981 (Director/Writer: Lau Kar-leung, Stars: Lau Kar-leung, Kara Hui, Hsiao Ho, Wang Lung Wei, and Gordon Liu, Cinematography: Ho Lan-shan, Runtime: 100 mins) DVD

Shanghai Express aka Millionaire’s Express from 1986 (Director/Writer: Sammo Hung, Stars: Sammo Hung, Yuen Biao, Rosamund Kwan, Mei-sheng Fan and Hwang Jang Lee, Cinematography: Arthur Wong, Runtime: 101 mins) DVD

A pair of Honk Kong action films. one a certified classic, the other a highlight in some actors filmography. First is the classic My Young Auntie. The story of a young woman named Cheng Tai-Nan who agrees to marry a dying man in order to hold his will away form his greedy brother. She will then hand the will over to a favored nephew Yu Cheng-chuan. The son of that nephew, who goes by Charlie Yu. He is a bit antagonistic to her, jokingly as she is close to his age. The auntie, nephew and great nephew must team with Cheng-chuans other brothers to retrieve the stolen will from the greedy uncle. Millionaire’s Express, aka Shanghai Express is about a guy blowing up the train tracks near a tiny town to get people to come to the businesses he just bought up. Plus a gang of bad guys planning a big job. There is a lot going on here actually but its not important

My Young Auntie is half a great film, and half an okay film. Luckily that okay film still has some good action. Kara Hui won the first Hong Kong Best Actress award for her performance and she is fun. Playing an old fashioned woman from the country who is determined in her mission and set in a traditional way being met by this grand nephew who sort of uses the new world to mess with her. Kara is engaging as both a fighter and actress. the scene where she is met with the new splendors at a Hong Kong market and giving in, buying a modern Chinese dress and heels that show more than she would like. Then the way she fights in them while trying to stay modest. Its one of my favorite scene sin the movie. She gets a little sidelined in the last part of the third act which kind of hurts it as she was fantastic through out handling action, drama and comedy. This film is a comedy, in the screwball way. Charlie Yu, played by Hsiao Ho is kind of dis-likeable but he always gets a rise out of her and their back and forth is fantastic. Also Lau Kar-leung is fun as the nephew. Great comic timing and style, but Lau is one of the greats of the Shaw Brothers era of films.

I say half a great film and half an okay film because when it moves from the screwball comedy surrounding Charlie and Cheng to get to the main story, it slows a bit. Its a little more serious and while the action is good, sometimes great, its less fun. It starts moving there after the awkward masquerade party scene which is a bit flimsy but the action set piece there is very well done. The film looks good and has some fantastic performances and action. Its also one of the Shaw Brothers studio’s only well regarded 80s film. Shaw Brothers were the largest Hong Kong studio. Founded in 1958 they were the leaders in HK cinema-specifically Kung Fu films. But 1987 they suspended film and worked in TV. The rise of Bruce Lee, the establishing of Jackie Chan as the biggest HK star, and changing tastes effected the studio and in a way, you can see Shaw Bros struggling to combine what worked in the past with the future in My Young Auntie. The old school meeting the new trends and the English influence (Charlie Yu studies English and likes American sports).

My Young Auntie I had only seen once before but this second viewing made me a bigger fan. I thought it was fun many years ago, now I think its one of the best kung fu films I ever seen. Not like, top 10 but it would rank high. (Points off for the Charlie character a stupid slur. The writers would have known better).

Where as my second viewing of My Young Auntie made me fall further in love with that picture, this viewing of Express makes me wonder. The films comedy doesn’t all land. As such it hurts the viewing of the film as the story is generally lackluster. The entire opening sequence is not important beyond introducing one character who shows up at the tail end of the second act. Then we set up the town, the criminals, the train, a number of people and my level of interest goes up and down depending. There are good performances and action-the direction is actually pretty grand in a modest budget western type of way. Its a mixed bag.

There is one piece that got a big laugh from me. The hotel room scene with the adulterous husband, his wife, the mistress, another couple and a dozen criminals. That was gold.

[My Young Auntie Trailer / Millionaire’s Express Trailer]

BONUS FILM: Doctor Sleep from 2019 (Director/Writer: Mike Flanagan and based on the novel by Stephen King, Stars: Ewen McGregor, Rebecca Ferguson, Kyliegh Curran, and Cliff Curtis, Cinematography: Michael Fimognari, Runtime: 152 mins)

Danny Torrance grown up, recovering alcoholic with a mystery friend. That friend, a young powerful girl named Abra Stone. Then there is Rose the Hat and a group of pseudo-immortals who feed off of steam-the death of those with the shining. Rose goes after Abra, and Abra reaches out to Danny to help.

I don’t love the Shining. I think its very good, well crafted from a technical standpoint with strong performances. I appreciate it. So I was not sold on this sequel after seeing it. The trailers did not really do much though I thought Rebecca Ferguson looked interesting and I liked what I have seen from director Mike Flanagan. So now that I seen Doctor Sleep I think its good. Thats it. It was a good horror film.

Like Shining I thought the performances were strong, I think visually its pretty cool with some interesting set pieces. There is some real good stuff here. I don’t think its as good as the Shining, but how could it be. Even as someone who is not in love with that film I knew it would be a step down and it is. Its good, its got some very cool things but it was something I could have waited to see.

[Trailer]

November 10th-The Big Boss from 1971 (Director: Lo Wei, Writers: Bruce Lee and Lo Wei, Stars: Bruce Lee, Maria Yi, James Tien and Tony Liu, Cinematography: Chan Ching-kui, Runtime: 115 mins)

Bruce Lee made a promise not to fight, but by the end of the film he is stabbing muthu fuckers. That’s it, that’s the movie.

[Trailer]

BONUS FILM: Of Human Bondage from 1934 (Director: John Cromwell, Writers: Lester Cohen, Ann Coleman and Based on Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham, Stars: Leslie Howard, Bette Davis and Frances Dee, Cinematography: Henry W. Gerrard, Runtime: 83 mins)

No, Bette, you should not have beaten Claudette Colbert for the Oscar.

[Film]

November 11th-One Armed Swordsman from 1967 (Director: Chang Cheh, Writers: Chang Cheh and Ni Kuang, Stars: Jimmy Wang, Lisa Chiao Chiao and Angela Pan, Cinematography: Yuen Chang-sam and Kuang Han-lu, Runtime: 116 mins)

At a swords school, a servant and student dies protecting his master by a gang. The master, who was briefly poisoned and recovering too late, agrees to take in the son Fang Kang (Fang Gang in the sub I was watching). Years later the masters daughter berates and taunts him with other students. Fang wants to leave to avoid issues but a confrontation with the daughter Pie-Er results in unforeseen blow losing his arm. Fang is nursed back to health by a woman he meets, she helps his recovery including a book to train his left side. When his former masters rival targets the school, Fang goes to his aid.

One Armed Swordsman is a Hong Kong, and Chinese classic. The first movie in Hong Kong to make HK1000000 in local box office. Which was $127k US then, which is almost a million now. Fascinating. The film also was ranked 15 on Honk Kong Cinemas poll of the best Chinese Language Films back in 2005. What I am saying is, this ones a heralded piece of international cinema. And its a really good action film.

It is a bit of a slow mover. Starts with a bang but there are stretches devoted to Fangs recovery and self teaching while the villains play in the background. Then it switches to various scenes dedicated to the bad guys. The basic bad guy plot is revenge and the bad guy has a lock blade thingie to fight all of Master Qu Ru Fengs disciples and the master himself. Its fine but the meat of the film is watching a once promising swordsman deal with his disability and becoming a better swordsman with one arm. The action scenes with him are really, really good. The action in general is great, even if the lock blade gimmick gets used multiple scenes.

This film is very pretty. From the light snow scene where Fang loses his arm-which is quite an amazing sequence. The yard of love interest Xiao-man is a nice little place to watch Fang develop. Parts of the film look like a painting. The sets are cool, the action pieces are well crafted, plus the costuming and music. Jimmy Wang is damn impressive in the lead and most everyone is good, though Qu Pie-Er character arc is odd. She actually loves Fang? She has a terrible way of showing it. I also wish we could have seen more action from her, she does almost nothing. Though Angela Pan is good in the role. Xio-man is a very traditional type of character. Nursing Fang, falling for him, concerned, etc. Lisa Chiao Chiao is very good in the role and I liked Tien Feng as the Master but really Jimmy Wang stands out the most.

I really enjoyed this film and suggest anyone interested in international action films or Shaw Bros films to check it out.

[Trailer]

November 12th-Yojimbo from 1961 (Director/Story: Akira Kurosawa, Writers: Ryūzō Kikushima, Akira Kurosawa and Hideo Oguni, Stars: Toshiro Mifune, Cinematography: Kazuo Miyagawa, Runtime: 110 mins)

Yojimbo is the much copied story of a samurai who comes to a two split into two warring factions. He begins to hire himself out as a bodyguard in order to hurt each side. However when he saves a woman to reunite her with her family, one gang gets wise to him.

Yojimbo is one of the classic samurai films that inspired one of the famous westerns (which was a remake that got shuttered for a while until deals were made) qnd other loosier remakes. Why would it not? Tough guy, bunch of baddies-so,e cartoonish in mannerisms and looks, plus action. All filmed and edited by the great Akira Kurosawa and starring the amazing Toshiro Mifune. I don’t know how anyone gives this less then 2 stars but eleven people gave it half a star on Letterboxd so you know there are people whose film opinion you can’t trust. Not that this is a full five for me. I really like Yojimbo but its not a major favorite of mine among Kurosawa’s work. Its beautifully filmed, one great example is watching Sanjuro, played by Mifune, on the bell tower in the middle background of the shot as the two warring groups inch closer. The action is fast and dynamic. The set up for certain scenes are god-teir. Like Sanjuro listening to one family talk about screwing him over after he helps. The performances are all really good. This film works on almost every level.

What I guess keeps me from going to high is… well, I don’t know really. The bad guys are a little ill defined but they do a lot and are imbued by strong or interesting performances. I do feel the ending is a little anti-climactic. There is something that keeps me a little bit at arms length. Its also not as fun as some samurai movies even if its technically better. Does not change that this is a great film. Glad I rewatched it.

[Trailer]

KING HU DOUBLE FEATURE: November 13th-Come Drink With Me from 1966 (Director: King Hu, Writers: King Hu and Ting Shan-hsi, Stars: Cheng Pei-pei and Yueh Hua, Cinematography: Ho Lan-shan, Runtime: 91 mins)

Dragon Inn from 1967 (Director/Writer: King Hu, Stars: Lingfeng Shangguan, Chun Shih, Ying Bai and Chien Tsao, Cinematography: Hui-Ying Hua, Runtime: 111 mins) bluray

A pair of films from influential Hong Kong director King Hu. First is second film, Come Drink With Me. A group of criminals kidnap a generals son in order to trade for their imprisoned leader. Golden Sparrow is sent to retrieve the hostage, who is her brother. On this mission she meets Drunken Cat who really is a powerful fighter. Dragon Inn is about.. man… Don’t even remember. Oh, political rivals and the effort to kill children of a political rival. Sure.

I love the first half come Drink With Me but I am not a huge fan of the second half. I think I said the same of My Young Auntie earlier but its more true here. The first half almost a masterpiece. So beautiful in look. From the sets to the beautiful temple. The talent of actress Cheng Pei-pei, the old school fight scenes, and just the flow. I loved watching Cheng’s Golden Sparrow face down so many baddies while Drunken Cat is in the background using trick to even the fight for her. King Hu is so good with his camera move,ent, how he capturs action, and just the overall stunning look of the film,

However after we learn the truth about Drunken Cat the story of him, it drags for me. Adding more fantasy to the film. I still like the fight scenes but I find this story rather distracting. I like Cat as a supporting player and while I am not mad he is an incredibly powerful fighter, I am annoyed how he takes away from Golden Sparrow. It just does not work for me like it does for others. Still, a very cool film and its fascinating that this was Hong Kongs entry into the 39th Academy Awards Foreign Picture competition. Sadly, did not make the cut.

I don’t have feelings towards Dragon Inn. It looks very good but I found it rather a chore to get through despite the action.

[Come Drink With Me Trailer / Dragon Inn Trailer]

Raging Bull from 1980 (Director: Martin Scorcese, Writers: Paul Schrader, Mardik Martin and Based on Raging Bull: My Story by Jake LaMotta, Joseph Carter and Peter Savage, Stars: Robert De Niro, Joe Pesci and Cathy Moriarty, Cinematography: Michael Chapman, Runtime: 129 mins)

Raging Bull is based on the true story of Jake LaMotta. A famous boxer best known for his rivalry with Sugar Ray Leonard. The film tracks him from his first fight with Leonard through his career, two divorces, fall out with brother, legal trouble, and him being a comedian in clubs. The film was nominated for several Oscars, winning for De Niro and editing for Themla Schoonmaker. Went on to be one of the most acclaimed films ever (over Ordinary People that beat it for best picture and director) going on to be #4 on the AFI Top 100 list.

I hated De Niro’s character. Fuck Jake LaMotta. But the performance was fantastic. Sure. Credit where credit is due. De Niro is great playing this asshole boxer. I really loved Cathy Moriarty. I had only seen her later in her career, in the 90s. I enjoyed her in those films and she is amazing here. Reading up, its bullshit she did not get more parts after this film. I really loved when she finally left him. Joe Pesci is very good too. This film has a lot of great performances even if I disliked most the characters. Scorcese movie looks great. The boxing scenes are brutal and the editing is pretty fascinating. Specifically in the boxing action. This is a very good looking film.

Now… I don’t ever want to see this film again. Its very good and I can’t really ping on anything other than not liking the people. I just don’t really care. One of the 10 best American films of all time? No thanks. I did dread seeing this film, I was not really into a lot of it until the second act and while I begin to like the film more and more it does not change my general feeling. I like this movie, I think its a really good film, I appreciate its importance I would take it off the AFI Top 100. But I’d probably take off all the Scorcese films so what do I know?

(I do really like Wolf of Wall Street though)

[Trailer]

BONUS: Final Exam from 1981 (Director/Writer: Jimmy Histon, Stars: Cecile Bagdadi, Joel S. Rice and Timothy L. Raynor, Cinematography: Darrell Catchart, Runtime: 89 mins)

I ran a poll on twitter about what to watch and I got one vote, for horror. So I found myself checking around and landed on this flick. Another god damn 1981 slasher film. Some crazy guy is killing students who did not go away for summer vacation. Beside that it follows various students in a day. Taking exams, hanging out, pranks, studying, etc.

Okay, this does not need to be a long review because for the most part the only thing that’s here is a slow burn that wants to care for its characters. After the opening sequence a lot of the film follows a mostly uninteresting group. That said, props to trying to male them interesting. The performances are all pretty decent actually. There is a real sense of location with the setting even if we only get to see some parts of the college. The stalking and murder sequences have little suspense and tension sadly. I do like there is no really information on the killer, and little desire to male them anything more than a murderer. I went three stars also because I appreciated that the final girl not only beat him, but stabbed him several times with a knife because seriously fuck that guy.

Also, better than more than half the slashers from the early 80s. I don’t know what it is with me. I love a good slasher but I find most slashers I have seen from the early 80s pretty lame. This one was pretty good.

[Trailer]

BONUS: The Sound of Music from 1965 (Director: Robert Wise, Writers: Ernest Lehman with Story by Maria von Trapp and Based on The Sound of Music by Howard Lindsay and Russel Crouse, Stars: Julie Andrews and Christopher Plummer, Cinematography: Ted D. McCord, Runtime: Getting tired of these three hour films)

The story of a postulant sent from the abbey to work as a governess. The home of Capt. von Trapp is disciplined and the kids have run through multiple governesses. However Governess Maria wins them over with songs and fun. She turns the Captain around who begins to fall in love with her. Then those asshole Nazis show up and ruin a good thing. The Von Trapps however escape.

This was on my first pill. After Final exam I put it up again with the same choices and this won. Not that more than one person voted… Anyway, I had been dreading this film like several on the AFI list. Why watch it now and not when Unspooled set a date? 1) On Disney+ and 2)It is my grandmoms favorite movie. Or so I am told. So I watched it on ,y tablet and I liked it.

Now, I generally like musicals but I did not like a single song in this film. Nope. I actually think indifference is the best way to describe my feeling toward them. They are what they are and Julie Andrews is quite an impressive singer. No, what I like was mostly everything else. Julie is a charismatic lead and quite likeable through out. She is fun to watch through out. While most the young von Trapps do little more than sing and work as plot devices, Charmian Carr as Liesl von Trapp does have an arc and she is very talented. While the song and dance number with Rolfe is not for me, I saw it as a metaphor for sex in the way it finished and felt her performance in those moments were fantastic. Christopher Plummer is very good. I think he hated this movie but I can remember, and if true he still gives a strong performance. Eleanor Parker and Richard Haydn are also good.

This film is also big. The shots of the country side, the von Trapps wonderful home, every set looks fantastic. The film has serious grandeur to it. One of those lavish old school Hollywood films. The costuming and the art direction are top notch. The story is interesting. Its a bit of simple Hollywood love story. Woman falls in love with a man who has children, also because of how she helps the parent connect with the children. But with added Nazis. Fuck Nazis. Captain von Trapp hated Nazis so the family flees at the end. Still, the basics of the story outside the baddies is similar to other films but if its not broke don’t fix it.

So yeah, it was damn good. Hope I don’t have anymore 3 hour films left.

[Trailer]

November 15th-Zebraman from 2004 (Director: Takashi Miike, Writer: Kankurō Kudō, Stars: Shō Aikawa, Cinematography: Kazunari Tanaka, Runtime: 115 mins)

The story of a sorry teacher and family man who dresses up like a favorite tv show character. Then the happenings of that show, and its unaired episodes, begin happening to him. So he fights bad guy aliens. I enjoyed this movie much more when I saw it a few times several years ago, now I think its just okay. The special effects have not aged well and back then they were cheap looking. It moves slower than I remember and there are some very dated story elements. The performances are good and I like the general idea. This one just did not age too well.

[Trailer]

Posted in film, horror, movies | Tagged , , , | 1 Comment

30 Days of Film in November-Week 1

November 1st-The Best Years of Our Lives from 1946 (Director: William Wyler, Writers: Robert E. Sherwood and Based on Glory for Me by MacKinlay Kantor, Stars: Myrna Loy, Fredric March, Dana Andrews, Teresa Wright, Virginia Mayo, and Harold Russell, Cinematography: Gregg Toland, Runtime: 172 mins)

The story of three service men who comes home from war. One with a wife and kids, trying to settle back into his old life while dealing with feeling out of place. Another returns to the wife he rushed into marriage with, while looking for a job and a wanting to start a new life. The last man, disabled returning home to a fiance and curious looks-struggling with his identity as a disabled veteran.

I did not want to do a serious film, or a long one for a while. I am coming off 50 or so horror films plus still reeling from Parasite. I wanted to jump into all the action I had planned for the first week or so. Jean Claude Van Damme films ready to go plus some Hong Kong and Japanese action flicks. Yet Unspooled decided to cover this and so I start the month with a film I was instantly dreading.

God damn it, this was fucking fantastic.

This cast was incredible. Frederic March, Dana Andrews, Harold Russell, Myrna Loy, Teresa Wright, and Cathy O’Donnell. Virginia Mayo was good to but a bit dislikable. Dana Andrews-wow, favorite film of his I have watched thus far. This cast was so damn good I got annoyed finding out Loy and Wright were not nominated for their roles. Yes, their characters are defined by the men but watching Loy trying to help her husband readjust to life while or Wright falling for Dana Andrews Fred-those relationships. Like the interplay between Dana and Virginia in their sinking marriage. The way March’s Al Stephenson is struggling with his new position r Fred Derry returning to a job he hoped to leave. Trying to do what he has to, Then Russell’s journey. Its amazing.

I don’t have much to say about the technical craft because its not flashy or noticeable. What it is serves every moment. Makes every moment feel important. Just the three men on the plane heading home feels incredibly well crafted. Or they’re drive through the city. The set ups and staging feel intimate. William Wyler, Gregg Toland and crew just make a film that feels real. I love also how Freds father is reading one of his sons accommodations to his wife while we watched Fred walk among the junked planes. He is dealing with the collapse of a marriage and lack of prospects. Just how this is all handle is so great.

This is one of the best films I have watched this year.

[Trailer]

UNPLANNED 2019 DOUBLE FEATURE: November 2nd-The Terminator from 2019 (Director: Tim Miller, Writers: David S. Goyer with Story by Tim Miller, David Ellison and James Cameron, Stars: Arnold Schwarzenegger, Linda Hamilton, Mackenzie Davis, Gabriel Luna, Natalia Reyes, and Diego Boneta, Cinematography: Ken Seng, Runtime: ? mins)

Godzilla: King of Monsters from 2019 (Director: Michael Dougherty, Writers: Michael Dougherty, Zach Shields with Story by Max Borenstein, Michael Dougherty and Zach Shields and based on the characters from Toho, Stars: Godzilla and his buddies and enemies, Cinematography: Lawrence Sher, Runtime: 132 mins)

Terminator is just another variation the first film. Someone comes back to protect a future leader from a terminator sent back to kill her. Godzilla fights monsters for reasons that don’t matter because we jusr want the action. Got it?

Terminator Dark Fate is one of the better sequels in that its more fun than then Salvation and Genisys. Haven’t seen 3 so I can’t compare. Grace protects Dani from a badass robot, Sarah Conner returns to fuck shit up, and another terminator that looks like Arnold. Some good laughs, some cool actions scenes and also some too dark which is annoying. I don’t have a lot to say because it would be just comparing 1 and 2 to this film here. Terminator is an all time fave, 2 is a classic. This is nowhere near as good. But it is a fun popcorn action film. Linda Hamilton is a treasure. Gabriel Luna should have had more lines because he is great. Mackenzie Davis and Natalia Reyes are very good, and probably future stars.

Godzilla has a story that is really worthless to explain. All that matters is some idiots let King Ghidorah loose and it wrecks havoc around the globe. Its a strong cast fiving their best to a film where they’re trials and tribulations really do not matter. We want kaiju violence. Ghidoarh is imposing, Rodan looks cool, wish there was more Mothra, and Godzilla is a beast. It was fun.

So yeah, a pair of films that are popcorn action films.

[Terminator: Dark Fate Trailer / Godzilla: King of the Monsters Trailer]

UNIVERSAL SOLDIER DOUBLE FEATURE: November 3rd-Universal Soldier from 1992 (Director: Roland Emmerich, Writers: Richard Rothstein, Christopher Leitch and Dean Devlin, Stars: Jean-Claude Van Damme, Dolph Lundgren and Ally Walker, Cinematography: Karl Walter Lindenlaub, Runtime: 102 mins)

Universal Soldier: Regeneration from 2009 (Director: John Hyams, Writer: Victor Ostrovsky, Stars: Jean-Claude Van Damme and Dolph Lundgren, Cinematography: Peter Hyams, Runtime: 97 mins)

Universal Soldier is the story of soldiers resurrected from death and sent out to do missions. The first one, shit goes sideways with two soldiers who had killed each other while in Vietnam. The other is about terrorists who kidnap the Ukranian Prime Ministers kids, plants bombs and also there are Universal Soldiers. So of course things go sideways.

The first Universal Soldier has the look of a traditional 90s action flick. Basic in look, clear shot of the action, and little else. Roland Emmerich’s film is a pretty basic looking film, the editing in the first several minutes is jarring, and the story takes a really cool premise and tu4ns the film into a start and stop chase film. This film should be a lot lousier than it is. Luckily we got a few strong performances to pull it out of the gutter of forgotten 90s action.

Dolph Lundgren does not get enough credit. He may be limited in range but he has always done what he can to infuse his characters with something special. He is fantastic as the villain, a dead man believing he is still in Nam, fighting a losing war. Ally Walker carries a lot of the film as the journalist, providing good humor and commentary through out. JCVD is rather… Well, its not my favorite performance but he plays it find. There are some humorous scenes and he nails the action, he plays it fine. Works well opposite Ally Walker and Lundgren. The fight scenes are decent, specifically the last one, and the actors really try to bring this promising material to life. I like it. Its fun.

Regeneration is a better film. While it has the look of a low budget direct to video flick the team create a tight, action flick. The Universal Soldier franchise is odd because there are two TV films listed as II and III, a direct sequel to the first film, and then this. This film believes you get the concept and just sets up the stage for action sequence after sequence. The terrorist holding hostages and setting bombs at Chernobyl, using a Universal Soldier to keep the good guys at bay. So while the story is generic its filled with pretty decent performances. Zahari Baharov, Kerry Shale, and Emily Joyce playing important roles to service the story. Returning JCVD has a smaller role, but is better here as the older, more damaged Deveraux. Doing a lot of acting in body language. Dolph has an extended cameo and his creepy, perfectly creepy.

The reason this rises up is the action scenes are fantastic. Andrei Arlovski is imposing as the badass Universal Soldier, just whupping ass. There is a video game FPS elements to certain sequences. The fight between Van Damme and Lundgren is one of my all time faves. The fight between Arlovski and Van Damme is also great. This is a film that understands what it wants to be and doesn’t try to junk it up. Its better than the original.

[Universal Soldier Trailer / Universal Soldier: Regeneration Trailer]

JCVD TRIPLE FEATURE: November 4th-Bloodsport from 1988 (Director: Newt Arnold, Writers: Christopher Cosby, Mel Friedman, Sheldon Lettich and Story by Sheldon Lettich, Stars: Jean-Claude Van Damme, Donald Gibb, Leah Ayres, and Bolo Yeung, Cinematography: David Worth, Runtime: 92 mins) dvd

Hard Target from 1993 (Director: John Woo, Writers: ‎Chuck Pfarrer, Stars: Jean Claude Van Damme and Lance Henriksen, Cinematography: Russell Carpenter, Runtime: 97 mins)-multi genre usb

Sudden Death from 1995 (Director/Cinematography: Peter Hyams, Writers: Gene Quintano with Story by Karen Elise Baldwin, Stars: Jean-Claude Van Damme, Powers Boothe, and Dorian Harewood, Runtime: 110 mins)* dvd

Bloodsport is about the Kumite, an illegal full contact martial arts tournament. The set up matters little, its about getting to the tournament and the fighting. This cheesy 80s action classic is dated, has a bunch of bad minor performances that make Van Damme look pretty good. Its shot very simply. Focused on the fighting-some of which looks pretty good and some of it looking corny. There are some decent shots of Hong King but nothing spectacular. This is not a good film, but its fun. Breeze to get through. This was my second viewing and my opinion did not improve or drop really. The How Did This Get Made? episode on this film is fantastic by the way.

Hard Target has Van Damme playing Chance, a greasy mullet dude in New Orleans. He agrees to help a woman named Natasha look for her missing father. They discover he was murdered and some dude is running an illegal hunting business he ripped from The Most Dangerous Game.. The film actually opens on the fathers murder, and then onto Yancy Butlers character search for him. So we get JCVD a little later in, having a chance meeting when he, of course, saves her from a multi-racial gang. 90s! His agreement to help her is really only for the opportunity to pay off Union dues to continue his job as a sea merchant. The story isn’t breaking new ground but its actually quite decent for this kind of film. It actually has a build with the wackiness on the bad guys for a good duration. JCVD has Kasi Lemmons, Lance Henrikson and even Wilford brimely among the supporting cast. Yancy Butler’s pretty good too, quite a likable and for a minute I was worried she wouldn’t get to punch back at all but she does shoot a mutha fucker so points. Its a good supporting cast, and Van Damme being Belgian, he does not seem too out of place in New Orleans except not enough people have that French accent. Oh well.

What makes this good is John Woo. Sure the film is him trying to intertwine his Hong Kong action style with American style. Or at least dialing it back. Still, his action scenes are pretty fucking cool. Not your usual Van Damme kickboxing and more of the gun totting type with lots of explosions. The final set piece-a warehouse with these weird models and statues is unsettling so of course its cool. I thought it was structured pretty well and could see a remake fixing certain issues. Those action scenes push what was a pretty decent film to a very fun action film. Incredibly enjoyable. Also, no real romance between Van Damme and Butler which was a breath of fresh air.

Sudden Death is a Die Hard knock off about a fire marshall at a hockey game with his kids. A terrorist group kidnaps the Vice President and others, bombs planted around the stadium. Itsna fucking fun film. You just go with it and you get JCVD fighting a mascot, burning a guy, shooting a bunch of people, being a goalie, a cute daughter character, and kills Powers Booth spectculalry. FOUR STARS!

Peter Hyams film is peak 90s action vibe and Powers Booth is great as the bad guy. This film isn’t deep, its just an incredibly good knock off. God bless JCVD.

[Bloodsport Trailer / Hard Target Trailer / Sudden Death Trailer]

November 5th-JCVD from 2008 (Director: Mabrouk El Mechri, Writers: Frédéric Bénudis, Mabrouk El Mechri and Christophe Turpin, Stars: Jean-Claude Van Damme, Cinematography: Pierre-Yves Bastard, Runtime: 96 mins)

Things are not going good for JCVD. He’s burned out on another low budget action film, feeling his age. He is in a custody battle for his young daughter. He wants to make a studio film but keeps getting low budget action flicks filming in Bulgaria. Plus he’s broke. Back in Brussels he is trying get money at a post office/bank only to get pulled into a bank robbery, with the robbers using him now as a front man. Sucks man.

Film opens up with a cool single shot action sequence that’s all part of a film (Hello, One Cut of the Dead. Not as elaborate but film within a film-you know). JCVD is having it hard and Van Damme is trying his best. He is annoyed with the lawyer using his action films as a weapon against him in the custody battle. He’s upset with his output, talking about he would take scale to be back in a studio film. He is annoyed, angry, sad and hopeful all throughout. Van Damme is giving his single best performance. He’s really good in this. People use to go on about the blankness in his expressions but with age, Van Damme’s face really feel expressive. He does a lot with just his looks. A lot with his body language. I also really enjoyed just him talking about filmmaking. When he’s talking films with one of the robbers, its great.

Now, lets get this out of the way-the visual style is a choice. The narrative structure is an interesting choice. Its an okay made film by a team trying really hard. So while not truly stylish it is fine. Most the supporting cast is there to fawn over Van Damme or serve the entire situation but the one asshole bank robber played by Zinedine Soualem is definitely better than his material. Just such a hateable guy. I’m not ragging on the supporting cast, they are all good. Definitely compared to some of the other Van Damme flicks I’ve seen where a lot of bit players are just groan worthy. Its a competently made film. It just is a JCVD showcase, and as such-its fucking great.

I don’t know why I like Van Damme. I guess of the action guys I just caught a few fun films and ranked him higher than most. I like the usual suspects, but JCVD and Lundgren are important figures to me. While Van Damme has never outright made a film I have given 5 stars too-I like his stuff. Its usually pretty fun or amusing. I like him, because he’s trying. It really feels like he wants to make decent movies to entertain people. I mean, even though I don’t rank Bloodsport that highly you still see people who talk bout how great that film is. I love Sudden Death. Its a favorite action film. I like JCVD. I really fucking like this film.

[Trailer]

November 6th-Black Water from 2018 (Director: Pasha Patriki, Writer: Chad Law, Stars: Jean-Claude Van Damme and Dolph Lundgren, Cinematography: Pasha Patriki, Runtime: 104 mins)

A movie where a decent idea is wasted on boring filmmaking and cliches. JCVD and Lundgren try though.

[Trailer]

November 7th-Enter the Ninja from 1981 (Director: Menahem Golan, Writers: Dick Desmond with Story by Dick Desmond and Mike Stone, Stars: Franco Nero, Susan George, Christopher George, and Sho Kosugi, Cinematography: David Gurfinkel, Runtime: 101 mins)

This was a thing with some decent action.

[Trailer]

BONUS: Street Scene from 1931 (Director: King Vidor, Writer: El,er Rice and based on his play, Stars: Estelle Taylor, David Landau, Sylvia Sidney, William Collier Jr. and Beulah Bondi, Cinematography: George Barnes and Gregg Toland, Runtime: 78 mins)

Set mostly in front of an apartment complex, built around the !Maurrant family. The neighbors gossip about an affair between Anna Maurrant and a milk man, daughter Rose is being pursued by men but has a connection with the Jewish boy, and the father is a jerk. Its a an adaptation so very focused.

The film is interesting. Lots of characters talking for the first act. Just lots of personalities doing their thing. One of the small plot points is the neighbor whose wife is pregnant, We never see the wife, just hi. dealing. Mrs. Anna Maurrant trying to be neighborly though several neighbors are talking about her. The everyday anti-semitism of a disgusting neighbor in that dudes two scenes. Film takes place basically in two days.

The second act introduces Sylvia Sidney, who is the reason I DVRed this the film. She is good. Navigating trying to be presentable and strong while dealing with asshole neighbors, a pushy boss (though he seems to mean well), her friendship/relationship with Sam and al the family issues. The third act is really about her in the aftermath of her fathers violent act. She is quite good, and the film is good. Its not great, but I liked it. It was a little boring at first but sucked me in by the end. I enjoyed it.

[Trailer]

1987 CULT CLASSIC ACTION DOUBLE FEATURE: November 8th-Hard Ticket to Hawaii from 1987 (Director/Writer: Andy Sidaris, Stars: Ronn Moss, Dona Speir, Hope-Marie Carlton, Cynthia Brimhall, Harold Diamond and Rodrigo Obregon, Cinematography: Howard Wexler, Runtime: 100 mins)

Miami Connection from 1987 (Directors/Story: Richard Park and Y.K. Kim, Writer: Joseph Diamond, Stars: Y.K. Kim, Cinematography: Maximo Munzi, Runtime: 83 mins)

WTF for both films.

First I watched Miami Connection about a synth rock band fighting a gang that’s a front for cocaine dealers. I think. Then Hard Ticket to Hawaii about… Agents and stolen diamonds and also a loose, poisonous snake. I think.

Miami Connection was interesting because beyond the terrible acting, dodgy editing and total lack of story there is a certain style to it. It looks half decent. This indy film had some money thrown at it and some of the settings look pretty decent. Including a fight in an empty Miami street. The action is actually pretty good. The music is an interesting choice and is used to cover up the total lack of plot. I give it credit but I can’t really recommend it. It was a fascinating watch.

Hard Ticket to Hawaii is dumber. It looks cheap, lots of nudity and dumb sex jokes, mostly boring. Hm… The women are very pretty and nothing against them, various Playboy Playmates, showing of their breasts. There’s a couple incredible kills. Its… I don’t know really. It was not downright awful but very lousy film. Started off hot, ending rather on a dull note.

[Miami Connection Trailer / Hard Ticket to Hawaii Trailer]

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31 Days of Film in October-Links, Rankings, & Stats

Another year of October fun. Started this several years ago and still on it. I actually have most. My films for next October. This was an interesting month. Some great stuff, lots of fun stuff, and lots of… meh.

Top 10 for October
1. One Cut of the Dead
2. Dementia
3. Parasite
4. Freaks
5. Joker
6. The Black Cat (1934)*
7. House of Wax (1953)
8. Carrie (1976)
9. The Grapes of Wrath
10. The Invisible Man
Just Below: All the Colors of the Dark, What Have You Done To Solange?

*Rewatched

Worst Film For October
The Undead

Films Watched
55 Total
51 New
4 Rewatch

Average Star Rating Based On My Letterboxd Ratings: 3.06 out of 5

October Weekly Reviews
Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Week 4, Week 5

Letterboxd|Twitter|Instagram

Previous Months Links, Rankings & Stats
January, February, March, April, June, July, August, September

By The Numbers
This Is An Incomplete List
All Names Are Actors Unless Otherwise Noted
Includes Archival Footage-Clips of a film with an actor were used in another film. For example, James Cagney movie plays in Fade to Black and are used as story elements in Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid.

Twenty-Three Films: Edith Head (Costume/Wardrobe)

Twenty Films: Bess Flowers (Queen of Extras), Alfred Hitchcock (Master of Suspense),

Eighteen Films: Cedric Ribbons (Production Design)

Fifteen Films: Humphrey Bogart (Includes Archival Footage), Cary Grant (Includes Archival Footage),

Fourteen Films: Jean Harlow, Franz Waxman (Composer),

Thirteen Films: Perc Westmore (Make-Up), Lyle R. Wheeler (Production Design)

Twelve Films: Adrian (Costume/Wardrobe), Wally Westmore (Make-Up),

Eleven Films: Mel Berns (Make-Up)

Ten Films: Roger Corman (Director/Actor), Eugene Joseff (Costume/Wardrobe), Bela Lugosi, Jack P. Pierce (Make-Up),

Nine Films: Orry-Kelly (Costume/Wardrobe), John Carradine, Joan Crawford (Includes Archival Footage), Boris Karloff, Vincent Price (Includes Archival Footage), Max Steiner (Composer), James Stewart,

Eight Films: Irene (Costume/Wardrobe), Mario Bava (Director/Writer/Cinematography), Ward Bond, Gino Corrado, Henry Fonda, Michael Mark, Dick Miller, Cyril J. Mockride (Composer), Bert Moorhouse, Alfred Newman (Composer), Hal Pereira (Production Design), Arthur Tovey, Vera West (Costume/Wardrobe), Billy Wilder (Director/Writer),

Seven Films: Lucien Ballard (Cinematographer), James Cagney (Including Archival Footage), Jack Carson, Arthur Edeson (Cinematography), Jules Furthman (Writer), Clark Gable, Howard Hawks (Director), Ben Hecht (Writer), Stephen King (Novelist), Carole Lombard, Peter Lorre, Frank McLure, Harold Rosson (Cinematographer), Miklos Rozsa (Composer), Roy Webb (Composer),

Six Films: Lionell Atwill, William Bendix, Wade Boteler, Walter Brennan, Robert Burks (Cinematography), Louis Calhern, Leo G. Carroll, Lon Chaney Jr., Spencer Charters, Elisha Cook Jr, Bette Davis (Includes Archival Footage), Jack Dawn (Make-Up), Charles D. Hall (Production Design), Theresa Harris, John Huston (Director/Writer), George Kennedy, Colin Kenny, Ted J. Kent (Editor), Charles Lang (Cinematographer), Fritz Lang (Director/Writer), Hattie McDaniel, Ray Milland (Includes Archival Footage), Marilyn Monroe, Franklin Pangborn, Gregory Peck, Edgar Allan Poe (Writer/Inspiration), John Qualan, Heinz Roemheld (Composer), Dorothy Spencer (Editor), Barbara Steele, Bert Stevens, Norma Varden, Joseph Walker (Cinematography),

Five Films: Wesley Addy, Edward Arnold (Includes Archival Footage), Mary Astor, Lauren Bacall, Irving Bacon, Martin Balsam, William Benedict, Charles Bennett (Writer), George Chandler, Harry Cording, Jeff Corey, George Cukor (Director), Marcel Dailo, Ann Doran, Pat Flaherty, Hugo Friedhofer (Composer), Stuart Freeborn (Make-Up), Dwight Frye, Steven Geray, Charley Grapwin, Porter Hall, Ernest Haller (Cinematography), Charles Halton, Harry Hayden, Katherine Hepburn, Holmes Herbert, Bernard Herrmann (Composer), Edward Everett Horton, Henry Jones (Archival Footage Included), Alan Ladd (Includes Archival Footage), Veronica Lake (Includes Archival Footage), Charles Lane, Charles Laughton (Actor/Director/Includes Archival Footage), John Leopold (Composer), John Litel, Doris Lloyd, Arthur Loft, Jean Louis (Costume/Wardrobe), Ernst Lubitsch (Director), Barton MacLane, Daniel Mandell (Editor), Rudolph Maté (Cinematography/Director), Edwin Maxwell, Torben Meyer, Robert Mitchum, Barboura Morris, Alan Mowbray, Nicholas Musuraca (Cinematography), Ben Nye (Make-Up), Robert Emmett O’Connor, Una O’Connor, Moroni Olsen, Garry Owen, Eugene Pallette, Sol Polito (Cinematography), Claude Rains, George Robinson (Cinematography), Sig Ruman, Jeff Sayre, Arthur P. Schmidt (Editor), John F. Seitz (Editor), Frank Sullivan (Editor), Ted Tetzlaff (Cinematography), Dimitri Tiomkin (Composer), George Tomasini (Editor), Jacques Tourneur (Director), Geoffrey Unsworth (Cinematography), John Williams (The Actor Not The Composer), James Whale (Director),

Four Films: Frank Albertson, Murray Alper, Morris Ankrum, Dario Argento (Director/Writer), Gertrude Astor, Colleen Atwood (Costume/Wardrobe), Stuart Baird (Editor), George Bassman (Composer), John Barry (Composer), Gordon Bau (Make-Up), Les Baxter (Composer), Ned Beatty, Ralph Bellamy, Brooks Benedict, Ingrid Bergman, Charles Bernstein (Composer), Billy Bevan, Clara Blandick, Joan Blondell, Eric Blore, Marlon Brando, Egon Brecher, Charles Bronson, W.R. Burnett (Writer), Frank Capra (Director), EE Clive, Charles Coburn, Joyce Compton, Jimmy Conlin, Jack Conway (Director), Gary Cooper, Alec Craig, Laird Cregar, Floyd Crosby (Cinematography), Jack Curtis, Jane Darwell, Adolph Deutsch (Composer), IAL Diamond (Writer), Robert Di Niro, Frank Ferguson, Victor Fleming (Director), George J. Folsey (Cinematography), Wallace Ford, Lance Fuller, Lee Garmes (Cinematography), Jeff Goldblum, Mary Gordon, Lawrence Grant, Robert Grieg, Charles B. Griffith (Writer), Moses Gunn, Sam Harris, Joan Harrison (Writer), Forrester Harvey, Paul Harvey, Audrey Hepburn, William Holden, James Wong Howe (Cinematography), John Hoyt, Olaf Hytten, Samuel L. Jackson, Ray June (Cinematography), Roscoe Karns, Fred J. Koenekamp (Cinematography), Norman Krasna (Writer), Milton Krasner (Cinematography), Stanley Kubrick (Director/Writer/Producer), Ernest Laszlo (Cinematography), Charles Lederer (Writer), William Levanway (Editor), Anita Loos (Writer), Ida Lupino, Joseph MacDonald (Cinematography), Fred MacMurray (Includes Archival Footage), John Lee Mahin (Writer), Owen Marks (Editor), Mae Marsh, Strother Martin, Raymond Massey, Una Merkal, Vicente Minnelli (Director), Thomas Mitchell, Lionel Newman (Composer), Daria Nicolodi, Edmond O’Brien, Robert Emmett O’Connor, Jack Palance, Inez Palange, Lee Patrick, Dorothy Peterson, Merrill Pye (Production Design), Ivan Rassimov, Ginger Rogers, Joseph Ruttenberg (Cinematography), Walter Sande, George Sanders, Mario Serandrei (Editor), Ann Sheridan, Sylvia Sidney, Curt Siodmark (Writer), Frank Skinner (Composer), Howard St. John, Larry Steers, Harry Stradling Sr. (Cinematography), Jo Swerling (Writer), Ubaldo Terzano (Cinematography), Gene Tierney, Robert Townsend, Spencer Tracy, Joseph A. Valentine (Cinematography), Ellinor Vanderveer, H.B. Warner, Robert Warwick, Paul Weatherwax (Editor), Richard Webb, Ferris Webster (Editor), Bud Westmore (Make-Up), Larry Wheat, Richard Widmark, Florence Wix, Will Wright, Kennan Wynn, Nedrick Young,

Three Films: Robert Aldrich (Director), Henri Alekan, Eddie ‘Rochester’ Anderson, Richard Anderson, Dana Andrews, George Axelrod (Writer), William Axt (Composer), Fay Bainter, Bobby Barber, George Barbier, Don Barclay, Harry Barris, Billy Barty, Louise Beavers, Lionel Belmore, Gregg Berger, Elmer Bernstein (Composer), Whit Bissell, Oliver Blake, Monte Blue, Sammy Blum, Beaulah Bondi, Charles Brackett, Al Bridge, Robert Brown, Sidney Buchman (Writer), Frederick Burton, Spring Byington, Frank Cady, James M. Cain (Writer), Leonard Carey, Milton Carruth (Editor), Walter Catlett, Raymond Chandler (Novelist/Screenwriter), Don Cheadle, Candy Clark, James B. Clark (Editor), Matt Clark, Wallis Clark, Mae Clarke, Dora Clement, Ruth Clifford, Chester Clute, Tony Curtis, David Clyde, Emmett Cogan, Sean Connery, Frank Conroy, Albert Conti, Maurice Costello, Joseph Cotton, Hazel Court, Jack E. Cox (Cinematohraphy), Hume Cronyn, Michael Curtiz (Director), Henry Daniell, Harry Davenport, Anthony Dawson, Doris Day, Richard Deacon, Ted De Corsia, Olivia De Havilland, Gustavo De Nardo, Frank De Vol (Composer), Harry Depp, William Demarest, Bruce Dern, Eddie Dew, Marlene Dietrich, Jean Dixon, Ruth Donnelly, Richard Donner (Director), Kirk Douglas (Includes Archival Footage), Melvyn Douglas, Jay Dratler (Writer), Elspeth Dudgeon, George Duning (Composer), Julius and Philip Epstein (Writer), Leif Erickson, Edith Evanson, Tom Ewell, Antonio Fargas, Don Fellows, Giancarlo Ferrando (Conematography), Charles Fleischer, Ian Fleming (Novelist), Rhonda Fleming, John Ford (Director), Hugh S. Fowler (Editor), Franco Fraticelli (Editor), Paul Frees, Beverly Garland, Judy Garland, Ernesto Gastaldi (Writer), John George, James Gleason, Charles Gross Jr. (Editor), Clu Gulager, Jean Hagen, Jonathon Hale, Murray Hamilton, Mark Hanna (Writer), Russell Harlan (Cinematography), Hugo Hass (Director/Writer/Actor), Gene Havlick (Editor), Sterling Hayden, John Michael Hayes (Writer), Patrica Hayes, Rita Hayworth, Jonathan Haze, John Heldabrand, Fay Helm, Darryl Hickman, Howard C. Hickman, Sidney Hickox (Cinematography), Jack Hill (Director), Leyand Hodgson, Edmund Holding (Writer and Director), Friedrich Hollaender (Composer), Miriam Hopkins, John Houseman, Olin Howland, Brandon Hurst, Walter Huston, Warren Hymer, Howard Jackson (Composer), Maurice Jarre (Composer), Scarlett Johansson, Russell Johnson, Carolyn Jones, Mary Gordon, Roy Gordon, Garson Kanin, Elia Kazan (Director), Brian Keith, Barry Kelley, Mike Kellin, Grace Kelly, Tom Kennedy, June Kenney, Erle C. Kenton (Director), Hal C. Kern (Editor), Donald Kerr, Guy Kibbee, Margot Kidder, Henry Kolker, Elsa Lanchester, Philip H. Lathrop (Cinematography), Marc Lawrence, Richard Lawson, Christopher Lee (with Archive footage), Jack Lemmon, Joseph LaShelle (Cinematography), Louis Levy (Composer), Lionel London (Cinematography), Ray Lovejoy (Editor), Herbert Lom, Otho Lovering (Editor), Michael Luciano (Editor), George Lynn, Donald MacBride, John McGiver, Matty Malneck (Composer), Marjorie Main, Hank Mann, Hugh Marlowe, Grouco Marx, Lois Maxwell, Mike Mazurki, Joel McCrea, Butterfly McQueen, Edward McWade, Harriet Medin, Beryl Mercer, John J. Mescall (Cinematography), Russell Metty (Cinematographer), John Miljin, Grant Mitchell, Jack Montgomery, Cleo Moore, Andre Morell, Ennio Morricone (Composer), Adrian Morris, Charles R. Moore, J. Carroll Nash, Noel Neil, William Newell, Alfred Newman (Composer), Bruno Nicolai (Composer), Roberto Nicolosi (Composer), Alex North (Composer), Edgar Norton, Pat O’Brien, Frank Orth, Rick Overton, Nat Pendleton, Anthony Perkins, Nehemiah Persoff, Luciano Pigozzi, Franz Planer (Cinematography), Donald Pleasence, William Powell, Tyrone Power, Andre Previn (Composer), Denver Pyle, George Raft, Gregory Ratoff, John Ratzenberger, Gene Raymond, Leoda Richards, John Ridgely, Massimo Righi, Thelma Ritter, Roy Roberts, William Roberts (Writer), Hugh A. Robertson (Editor), May Robson, Howard Emmett Rogers (Writer), Donald R. Rondell, Hayden Rorke, Richard Roundtree, Deep Roy, Mark Ruffalo, Kurt Russell, Carlo Rustichelli, Tim Ryan, Hans J. Salter (Composer), Erskine Sanford, Telly Savalas, Joe Sawyer, Sauro Scavolini (Writer), Palo Schifrin (Composer), Lizabeth Scott, Dan Seymour, Leon Shamroy (Cinematography), Anita Sharp-Bolster, Jack Sholder (Director/Editor), Henry Silva, Jay Silverheels, Russell Simpson, C. Aubrey Smith, Terrance Stamp, Wyndham Standing, Barbara Stanwyck (Includes Archival Footage), Ronald Stein (Composer), Henry Stephenson, George Stevens (Director), Donald Ogden Stewart (Writer), George E. Stone, Harold J. Stone, Lewis Stone, Herbert Stothart (Composer), Glenn Strange, Woody Strode, Donald Sutherland, Julius Tannen, Regis Toomey, Leo Tover (Cinematography), Arthur Tovey, Henry Travers, Burnell Tucker, Ralph Von Seyffertitz, Dalton Trumbo (Writer), Alida Valli, John Vernon (includes Archival Footage), Bruno VeSota (Actor/Writer), Walter Walker, Raoul Walsh (Director), Rachel Ward, John Wayne, Damon Waynes, Mel Welles, Pat West, Chill Wills, O.Z. Whitehead, Ian Wolfe, John Wray, Christopher Young (Composer), Victor Young (Composer),

Two Films: Ann-Margret, Enrique Acosta, Eddie Acuff, Brooke Adams, Eddie Albert, John Alcott (Cinematography), Fred Aldrich, Maxine Alexandre (Cinematography), Nancy Allen, Leon Ames, Arthur Anderson, Mary Anderson, Judith Anderson, Stanley Andrews, Heather Angel, Edward Anhalt (Writer), Evelyn Ankers, George Antheil (Composer), Maurice Argent, Arthur A. Arling (Cinematography), Jean Arthur, Fred Astaire, Roscoe Ates, Edith Atwater, Lew Ayres, Diane Baker, Lynn Baggett, Raymond Bailey, Ann Bancroft, George Bancroft, George Barnes, (Cinematography), Lionel Barrymore, Walter Bason, George Barton, Jacob Batalon, Tyler Bates (Composer), Hubert Bath (Composer), L. Frank Baum (Novelist), David Baxt, Barbara Bel Geddes, Hank Bell, James Bell, Robert Benchley, Robert Russell Bennet (Composer), Sally Benson (Writer), Henry Berman (Editor), Clem Bevans, Roger Beverly, Lynette Bernay, Alberto Bevilacqua (Writer), Kent Beyda (Editor), A.I. Bezzerides (writer), Ted Billings Peter Billingsley, Herman Bing, Ole Bratt Birkeland (Writer), Joseph F. Biroc (Cinematography), Larry J. Blake, Ronee Blakely, George Boemler (Editor), Rudy Bond, Beaulah Bondi, Ernest Borgnine, Willis Bouchey, Matthew Boulton, George Bowler (Editor), George Bowers (Editor), Lovyss Bradly, Leigh Brackett (writer), Charles Bradshaw (Composer), George Brent, Helen Broderick, Norbert Brodine (Cinematography), Adam Brody, James Brolin, Hilary Brooke, Barbara Brown, Charles D. Brown, Clarence Brown, Peter Brown, Tod Browning (Director), Mae Bruce, Nigel Bruce, Horst Buchholz, Jan Buckingham, Victor Buono, Joe Burke, Raymond Burr, Tony Burton, Francis X. Bushman Jr., W.R. Burnett (Writer), Tim Burton (Director/Art Design), David Buttolph (Composer), Stephen H. Burum (Cinematographer), Dan Butler, James Caan, Susan Cabot, Charles Cane, Truman Capote (Writer), Morris Carnovsky, Jack Carr, Anthony Carras (Editor), Lynn Cartwright, Antony Caruso, Bernie Casey, Agatha Christie (Novelist/Stage Writer), Claire Carleton, John Carpenter (Director/Writer/Composer/Editor), Maeline Carroll, Frances Carson, Bernie Casey, Nora Cecil, Wheaton Chamers, George Chandler, Lita Chevret, Ken Christy, Eduardo Ciannelli, Al Clark (Editor), Bob Clark (Director/Writer), James B. Clark (Editor), Marlene Clark, Mae Clarke, John Cleese, Colin Clive, Anne V. Coates (Editor), James Coburn, Lenore J. Coffee, Larry Cohen (Director/Writer), Claudette Colbert, Tom Coleman, Ray Collins, Chester Conklin, Heine Conklin, Russ Conway, Tom Conway, Elisha Cook Jr., Charles Cooper, Jeane Cooper, Melville Cooper, Maxine Cooper, Tex Cooper, Ellen Corby, Wendell Corey, Mariclae Costello, Jospeh Cotton, Jerome Cowan, Brian Cox, Tony Cox, David Cronenberg (Director/Actor), Edward Cronjager (Cinematography), Jerome Cowen, Robert Cummings, Peggy Cummins, Jamie Lee Curtis, Sidney Cutner (Composer), Charles Cyphers, Howard Da Silva, Mark Dacascos, Willen Dafoe, William H. Daniels (Cinematography), Royal Dano, Sonia Darrin, Linda Darnell, William B. Davidson, William Davis, Laraine Day, Jean De Briac, Robert De Grasse (Cinematography), Jules Dassin (Director), Andre De Toth, Rob Delaney, Nick Dennis, Reginald Denny, Andy Devine, Brad Dextor, Khigh Dhiegh, Dante DiPaolo, Dick Dickinson, Arturo Dominici, Pino Donaggio (Composer), Sarah Douglas, Doris Dowling, Cathy Downs, Robert Downey Jr., Betsy Drake (Actor/Writer), Howard Duff, Tommy Duggan, Margaret Dumont, Faye Dunaway, Emma Dunn, Dan Duryea, Robert Duvall, Shelley Duvall, Clint Eastwood, James Edwards, Robert S. Eisen (Editor), Jack Elam, James Ellison, John Emery, Rudi Fehr (Editor), Fern Emmett, Estelle Etterre, Chris Evans, Rex Evans, Francis Edward Faragoh (Writer), Dennis Farina, William Faulkner (Writer), Rudi Fehr (Editor), Edwige Fenech, Gabriele Ferzetti, Verna Fields (Editor), Steve Fisher (Writer), Barry Fitzgerald, Paul Fix, Joe Flood, Elizabeth Flourney, George J. Foley (Cinematography), Marcello Fondato (Writer), Joan Fontaine, Luis Forbes (Composer), Francis Ford, Robert Forster, Byron Foulger, Almeda Fowler, Scott Frank (Writer), Benjamin Franke (Composer), John Frankenheimer (Director), Helen Freeman, Charles Frend (Editor), Gerald Fried (Composer), Edward Gargan, Tay Garnett (Director), John Gavin, Merritt B. Gerstad (Cinematography), Frank Gerstle, John Gieguld, Billy Gilbert, Stuart Gilmore (Editor), Tom Gilmore, Vaughan Glaser, Scott Glenn, Willis Goldbeck (Writer), Jerry Goldsmith (Composer), Lisa Golm, Eiza Gonzalez, Gavin Gordon, Walter Gotell, Gloria Grahme, Colleen Gray, Jack Dylan Grazer, Clarence Greene (Writer), Sydney Greenstreet, James Gregory, Pam Grier, Kathy Griffin, Harry Guardino, Burnett Guffey (Cinematography), Edmind Gwenn, Jake Gyllenhaal, Greta Gynt, Robert Haines, Alan Hale, Victor Halperin (Director), Margaret Hamilton, William Hamilton (Editor), Dashiel Hammett (Novelist), Cedric Hardwicke, Lumsden Hare, Leigh Harline (Composer), Rand Harper, Marilyn Harris, Henry Hathaway (Director), Rutger Hauer, Martha Hayer, Allison Hayes, Margaret Hayes, David Hemmings, Michael Herz (Director), Remy Hii, Walter Hill (Director/Writer), Brent Hinkley, Monckton Hodge (Writer), Samuel Hoffenstein, Tom Holland (Director/Writer), Judy Holliday, John Hollis, Celeste Holm, Jack Holt, Tim Holt, Mark Holton, Oskar Homolka, James Horner (Composer), Leslie Howard, Ron Howard (Director/Actor), Rochelle Hudson, Rock Hudson, Ken Hughes (Director), Frank E. Hull (Editor), Henry Hull, Alan Hume (Cinematography), Holly Hunter, Paul Hurst, Leila Hyams, Rex Ingram, Michael Ironside, Robert Ito, Paul Ivano (Cinematography), Brion James, Gladden James, Allen Jenkins, Elton John (Singer/Actor), Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Nunnally Johnson (Writer), Freddie Jones, Grace Jones, Darwin Joston, Lampros Kalfuntzos, Bronislau Kaper (Composer), Bernhard Kaun (Composer), Edward Keane, Michael Keaton, Cecil Kellaway, Nancy Kelly (Archival Footage Included), Arthur Kennedy, Ken Kercheval, Charles Kevin (Composer), Evelyn Keyes, Gary B. Kibbe (Cinematography), Udo Kier, Aton Kincaid, Tony King, Leonid Kinsky, Werner Klemperer, Bernard Knowles (Cinematography), Patric Knowles, Clarence Kolb, Clarence Kolster (Editor), Rudolph G. Kopp (Composer), Alma Kruger, Lloyd Kaufman (Director/Writer), Jack Kruschen, Nancy Kyes, John La Mesurier, Martin Landau, Priscilla Lane, Jessica Lange, Ring Lardner Jr., Bobby Larson, Sydney Lassick, John Latch, John Laurie, Piper Laurie, Gabriele Lavia, Viola Lawrence (Editor), William Leanway (Cinematography), Chris Lebenzon, James A. Lebovitz (Cinematographer), Raymond Lebotiz (Editor), Janet Leigh, Vivien Leigh, Virgina Leith, Richard LeParmentier, Joan Leslie, Benn W. Levy (Writer), Harry Lewis, Joseph H. Lewis (Director), John Lithgow, Desmond Llewellyn, George Lloyd, Carol Locatell, Gene Lockhart, Donal Logue, Frank Lovejoy, Warren Low, Edward T. Lowe Jr., Myrna Loy, Sidney Lumet (Director), James Luisi, George Lynn, Derek Lyons, George Burr Macannan, Ranald MacDougall (Writer), Robert MacLeod, Ben Maddow, Michael Madsen, Richard Maibaum (Writer), Karl Malden, Marini Malfatti, Albert Maltz (Writer), Henry Mancini (Composer), Tom Mankiewicz (Writer), Jayne Mansfield, Richard Marcus, Antonio Margheriti (Director), Michael Mark, Marino Mase, Jean Marsh, Tully Marshall, Alphonse Martell, Helen Martin, Steve Martin (Actor/Writer), Arthur Martinelli (Cinematography), Lucien Martini (Writer), Sergio Martino (Director), Marx Bros (Chico and Harpo), John Mathieson (Cinematography), Victor Mature, James McAvoy, Kevin McCarthy,Marc McClure, Patty McCormack (Archival Footage Included), Joel McCrea, Frances McDonald, John D. McDonald (Writer), Roddy McDowall, Margaret McWade, James Kevin McGuinness (Writer), Edward Meade, Toshiro Mifune, Vera Miles, Gene Milford (Editor), John Milius (Writer), Kristine Miller, Hayley Mills, David Miller (Director), Lee Miller, Victor Milner (Cinematography), Howard M. Mitchell, Laurie Mitchell, John Mitchum, Hayao Miyazaki (Director/Writer), Dickie Moore, Juanita Moore, Victor Moore, Agnes Moorehead, Frank Moran, Baboura Morris, Patricia Morrow, Michael Murphy, Clarence Muse, Reggie Nalder, Charles Napier, Howard Negley, Dorothy Neumann, Alfred Newman (Composer), David and Leslie Newman (Writers), Jack Nicholson, Leonard Nimoy, Kim Novak, Joseph Nussbaum (Composer), Christian Nyby (Editor), William H. O’Brien, Kevin O’ Conner, Martha O’Driscoll, Jack O’Halloran, Ryan O’Neal, Oscar O’Shea, Ben Oakland (Composer), Ken Olandt, Laurence Olivier, Merritt Olsen, Frank Otto, Maria Ouspenskaya, Reginald Owen, Riccardo Pallottini (Cinematography), Dorothy Parker (Writer), Charles Paton, Elizabeth Patterson, Wolfgang Petersen, Valerie Perrine, Frank V. Philips (Cinematography), Irving Pichel, Jack P. Pierce (Writer), Ania Pieroni, Edward Platt, Oscar Polk, Albert Popwell, Victor Potel, Dick Powell, Dinny Powell, William Prince, Tilo Prücknker, Mario Puzzo (Writer), Anthony Quayle, Milo Quesdada, John Sayles (Writer), Stanley Shapiro (Writer), Giuliani Raffaelli, Umberto Raho, Tony Randall, Jane Randolph, John Randolph, Jean Ransome, Samson Raphaelson (Writer), Nicholas Ray (Director/Writer), Paula Raymond, Robert Redford, Manning Redwood, Alan Reed, Christopher Reeve, George Reeves, Frano Ressel, Alma Reville (Writer), Ryan Reynolds, Leoda Richards, Thomas Richards (Editor), Stanley Ridges, Shane Rimmer, Elizabeth Risdon, Beatrice Roberts, Leona Roberts, Edward G. Robinson, Mark Robson (Writer), William Roerick, Clayton Rohner, Owen Roizman (Cinematography), Greg Roland (Cinematography), Lawernce Roman (Writer), Harry Rosenthal, Angelo Rossitto, Ellyn Rosyln, Mickey Rourke, Russell Rouse (Writer), Charles Ruggles, Wesley Ruggles (Director), John Rusell, Rosalind Russell, Morrie Ryskind (Writer), Howard St. John, Waldo Salt (Writer), Chris Sarandon, John Saxon, William Schaller, Maximilian Schell, Lalo Schifrin (Composer), Russel F. Schoengarth (Editor), Joseph Schrank (Writer), George Segal, Lorenzo Semple Jr. (Writer), Mario Serendrei (Editor), Blanche Sewell (Editor), Leo Shaken (Composer), Joan Shawlee, William Shea (Editor), Martin Sheen, Reginald Sheffield, Ann Sheridan, David Shire (Composer), Howard Shore (Composer), Tony Sibbald, Don Siegal (Actor/Director), Frank Sinatra, Carl Sklover, Everett Sloane, Charles Martin Smith, Dan Snow, Drew Snyder, Vladimir Sokoloff, Suzanne Somers, Alberto Spagnoli (Cinematography), Ned Sparks, Dorothy Spencer (Editor), Douglas Spencer, Lionel Stander, Harry Dean Stanton, Sylvester Stallone, Benito Stefanelli, Rod Steiger, John Steinbeck (Writer), John Steiner, Naomi Stevens, Josef Von Sternberg (Director), Onslow Stevens, Paul Stewart, Ludwig Stössel, Randy Stuart, Harry Stubbs, Preston Sturges (Director/Writer), Grady Sutton, Seijun Suzuki (Director), Ben Taggert, Isao Tamagawa, Russ Tamblyn, Daniel Taradish (Writer), Ron Tarr, Frank Tashlin (Director and Writer), Ada and Arlene Tau, Dub Taylor, Libby Taylor, Samuel A. Taylor (Writer), Lewis Teague (Director), Fabio Testi, Harvey F. Thew (Writer), George Tobias, Gregg Toland (Cinematography), Marisa Tomei, Franchot Tone, John Tourette, William Tracy, Emerson Treacy, Clare Trevor, Lana Turner (Includes Archival Footage), Edgar G. Ulmer (Director/Production Design/Costumes), Brenda Vaccaro, Conrad Veidt, John Vernon (Archival Footage Included), Martha Vickers, Yvette Vickers, Henry Victor, Sidney Wagner (Cinematography), Raymond Walburn, Christopher Walken, Bill Walker, Robert Walker, Tracey Walter, Eli Wallach, Anthony Warde, David Warner, Keenan Ivory Waynes (Actor, Writer, and/or Director), Clifton Webb, Ferris Webster (Editor), Paul Weigel, Tuesday Weld, David Weisberg (Editor), Orson Welles (Actor, Writer, Director), Mae West (Actor/Writer), James Westerfield, Bill Weston, Garnett Weston (Writer), Jesse White, Merrill G. White (Editor), James Whitmore, Dame May Whitty, Patrick Whyte, Henry Wilcoxon, Harry J. Wild (Cinematography), Cornel Wilde, Hagar Wilde, Kathleen Wilhoite, John Williams (Composer), Rhys Williams, Robert Williams, Laureen Willoughby, Clarence Wilson, Marie Windsor, Robert Winkler, Isabel Withers, Googie Withers, Sam Wood (Director), William Wyler, Jane Wyman, George Worthin Yates (Writer), Clifton Young, Gig Young, Mary Young, Robert Young, Susannah York, William H. Zeigler, Carl Zittrer (Composer)

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