31 Days of Film in January 2020-Week 3

January 13th-The Wild Bunch from 1969 (Director: Sam Peckinpah, Writers: Walon Green and Sam Peckinpah, Stars: William Holden, Robert Ryan, Ernest Borgnine, Edmond O’Brien, Ben Johnson and Warren Oates, Cinematography: Lucien Ballard, Runtime: 143 mins)

I liked the first ten or so minutes but once we got to know the characters, I checked out until the action kicked back in. Will need to rewatch with more concentration but I did not care about it. Technically I get it. Its a famous Western. Its just I have a harder time with Westerns though I have liked the ones I saw last year.

[Trailer]

January 14th-The Lady Hermit from 1971 (Director: Meng Hua Ho, Writers: I. Fang Yeh, Stars: Pei-Pei Cheng, Lieh Lo, Szu Shih, and Hsieh Wang, Cinematography: Yu-Tang Li and Kuo-Hsiang Lin, Runtime: 95 mins)

A Shaw Bros film. That means kung fu action and excitement. Starring Cheng Pei-Pei, Lady Hermit is three stories. One involves wanting to vanquish evil bad guy Black Demon. The Lady Hermit Ling herself and young martial artist Chin Tsui, who wants to be a great martial artist. Chin Tsui is also seeking the mentorship of Lady Hermit, who she hears is one of the greatest martial artists. Then there is the love triangle with Chang Chun. He has feelings for the servant who is really Hermit hiding out, who is unsure of reciprocity. Her new student is crushing on Chang Chun. Basically the A plot is slim with a bunch of awesome action and minor melodrama delivered by very good performances.

I know that Come Drink With Me is Cheng Pei-Pei most famous film of her Shaw Bros era but damn it, I think she is better in this film. She is still kicking a lot of ass but her performance is fantastic. She is so good. Sweet, charismatic, determined. She is so good. Szu Shih is very good as the bratty but determined Chun Tsui and she delivers in her action scenes. I mean the only wooden performance from the main player is really the bad guy who is just there to be the bad guy.

Yeah, the plot about Black Demon is weak but the film is well paced and makes up for it with other developments. When we find out about Hermits last fight with Black Demon hurting her we start going into her training Chin, then the developments with Chang Chun, it makes the second act work. Work a lot better then it probably should. The first act is built around the search for the Hermits identity and the third act is the string of action leading to the final clash. It really doesn’t drag which sometimes these Hong Kong action films do. Its why I rate thus higher than Come Drink with Me, which despite all its wonderful parts I think drags in parts and has a weaker third act.

Part of the reason this one is so good is the action. Its bloody, brutal, and fun. With those quick editing to make things look like these fighters are supernatural. It also doesn’t blow it by putting the best stuff early on. It has a few short fights at the start leading to a fantastic battle. The second act has less action, then the third is wild. With Chin going solo and having fantastic battles including the bridge fight. Hermit in the bamboo forest. Then the action in Black Demons fort with both ladies. Including Black Demon fights. It helps with the various shift in surroundings. It feels about the world. From a town square, the large homes and temples, to the fort. It feels kind of epic.

Also, that ending… pushed it over for me.

[Trailer]

January 15th-Waterloo Bridge from 1931 (Director: James Whale, Writers: Benn Levy and Tom Reed and based on the 1930 play by Robert E. Sherwood, Stars: Mae Clarke, Kent Douglass, Doris Lloyd, and Bette Davis, Cinematography: Arthur Edeson, Runtime: 81 mins)

Baby Face from 1933 (Director: Alfred E. Green, Writers: Gene Markey, Kathryn Scola with Story by Darryl F. Zanuck and Mark Canfield, Stars: Barbara Stanwyck, Cinematography: James Van Trees, Runtime: 75 mins)

First film is Waterloo Bridge which has Mae Clarkes sex worker, former chorus girl, picking up a young soldier but scared to press the naive soldier who just thinks a pretty girl likes him. He becomes infatuated with her, probably in part because he is in war and does not get to socialize with much women. Mae Clarks Myra is lonely, broke and scared but does not want to take advantage of him. He is pressuring her about marriage, and introduces her to his well-to-do family. She explains who she really is to the mother who does not disclose her secret. All leading up ti a depressing WTF ending.

I am grading this on a curve. Its 1931 and based on a stage play. While not a film I really liked, I did not mentally check out at any point which was a positive. I was actually impressed by the scope of such a small and early thirties film. You get a feel for Myra’s small part of the world with scenes out in public and on the Waterloo Bridge. As well as a glimpse of the splendor of the young soldiers family fortunes. The performances are all very dramatic in the theater sense. James Whale is a very good director and stages everything well. The photography is really good too. Though I find Kent Douglass a bit restrained compared to others around him, which I appreciated. So yeah, its pretty good if you like melodramas. Heard the Vivian Leigh redo is inferior.

Second film is the other film from that three movie set. Another pre-code classic, notorious for its time. Barbara Stanwyck plays a woman who is not happy with her life. When she gets an out, and based on suggestion from a Nietzsche reading doctor, Stanwycks Lily works her way through the shot callers of the bank with sex. Ends up ruing one poor womans life who we only see in two scenes. I feel bad for her. But basically Lily dated that womans fiance, broke up with him and started dating her father who was the president of the bank (I think, writing this a day later) but that fiance was obsessed with. Then murder suicide between the guys. New bank president transfers her to Paris in exchange for her not talking to papers. Then they get a thing going.

So… yeah. Another film that was good. Looked fine, some great shots, Stanwyck is pretty and does a good job. All the men are idiots. I really don’t have much to say. It is not a film i really liked. I read it was Warner Bros. response to Red Headed Woman which I prefer. But it was fine with some shocks and generally amusing. So yeah.

[Waterloo Bridge Has No Trailer On Youtube / Baby Face Trailer]

January 16th-The Mark of Zorro from 1940 (Director: Rouben Mamoulian, Writers: John Taintor Foote with Story by Garrett Fort, Bess Meredyth and Based on The Curse of Capistrano by Johnston McCulley, Stars: Tyrone Power, Linda Darnell, and Basil Rathbone, Cinematography: Arthur C. Miller, Runtime: 94 mins)

Its Zorro! Do I need to explain this one? Don Diego Vega returns home to find the common people abused by a corrupt government. His father was pushed out of office by these terrible people. He dons the mask of Zorro and goes after them. Starts falling for the niece of the man in charge, a woman named Lolita. Zorro saves the day by the way. A remake of the 1920s silent film adaptation of The Curse of Capistrano, the first Zorro story which would be renamed after then1920s film.

The film kicks off and for the first five or so minutes nothing interesting. You quickly see the change in Tyrone Powers performance when he meets the people in charge. He does the Bruce Wayne/Batman dual identity. The playboy pretending and then in reality the Zorro. Tyrone really shines and it takes a while for anything else to really catch up. Mostly working around everyone else, including Basil Rathborne who usually is so good. Here he Basil is fine, just not exceptionally deep as the vicious captain. Linda Darnell is fine, getting more to do as the film progresses but still just the love interest. Luckily she works well with Tyrone.

Visually the film looks fine. The staging of the action being the best scenes. Though the dance number is pretty nice. The costuming is pretty fantastic. Its a pretty cool film, I am curious about the 1920s version. Cause the 1920s one is the film the Wayne Family saw before Bruce lost his parents. This version is used in updates of his origin.

[Scene]

QUADRUPLE FEATURE: January 17th-Mission: Impossible from 1996 (Director: Brian De Palma, Writers: David Koepp, Robert Towne with Story by David Koepp & Steven Zaillian and Based on Mission: Impossible by Bruce Geller, Stars: Tom Cruise, Cinematography: Stephen H. Burum, Runtime: 110 mins)

Mission: Impossible 2 from 2000 (Director: John Woo, Writers:
Robert Towne with Story by Ronald D. Moore, Brannon Braga and Based on Mission: Impossible by Bruce Geller, Stars: Tom Cruise, Cinematography: Jeffrey L. Kimball, Runtime: 123 mins)

Mission: Impossible 3 from 2006 (Director: J.J. Abrams, Writers: J. J. Abrams, Alex Kurtzman, Roberto Orci and Based on Mission: Impossible by Bruce Geller, Stars: Tom Cruise, Cinematography: Dan Mindel, Runtime: 126 mins)

Mission: Impossible – Ghost Protocol from 2011 (Director: Brad Bird, Writers: Josh Appelbaum and André Nemec and Based on Mission: Impossible by Bruce Geller, Stars: Tom Cruise, Cinematography: Robert Elswit, Runtime: 133 mins)

In the first film Ethan Hunts IMF team is mostly knocked off during a mission by a mole. Now disavowed, him and team member Claire Phelps put together a team to weed out the mole and to set up the person who was looking for the NOC list known as Max. Some stealth work, spycraft and action mixed in with a few twists and you get the first Mission: Impossible film.

Going to breeze through this quickly because I have a total of 6 films over at least 2 days. The first film is a straight up spy thriller with sadly that 90s shine to it. That particular look a lot of 90s films have. Hard to describe but visually not up to par with the Brian De Palma films I like. Not that it looks bad, it just has a lot to do with the change in how movies are filmed. Besides that, its a well staged movie. De Palma constructs scenes that really work well and he has quite a cast, so it is not Tom Cruise carrying everything. Jon Voight, Emmanuelle Béart, Vanessa Redgrave, Ving Rhames and others do a very fine job. The story itself is good, though remembering the twist had me waiting for a while for certain things to occur. I think this one, while a very good spy thriller, kind of has little replay value. Outside the first act which I completely forgot about. The stuff that happens after Hunt goes on the run is not as strong. The film does not have the same fun energy as the last three movies though it is a great start for the franchise.

M:I2 has Hunt recruiting a thief who is the ex-girlfriend to a terrorist who has acquired a dangerous chemical weapon. No major twists and turns this time around. Good spy stopping bad guys. There is more interpersonal stuff like the romance between Hunt and Nyah and also a scene Nyah injecting herself with the poison to screw up her exes plans and we get the countdown to save her. Really though, who cares because this one lives up its reputation of not being good.

The opening bit with the doctor is the first bit of change. His narration and plan seems out of place for this. Then we get the airplane scene which is fine but then some overlong opening credits wit Cruise solo rock climbing. This film has that post Matrix gloss and the action sequences and sound effects are a departure from the first film. It also drags. A lot. It is boring. The best scenes for Cruise and Thandie Newton (playing Nyah) is their meeting up to their separation for the job. I am disappointed in John Woo. You made Hard Boiled, the Killer and A Better Tomorrow. Or maybe disappointed in everyone else on the production side? Lets move on.

Ethan Hunt quits and gets engaged. To bad IMF need him when an agent is caught on assignment. The rescue does not go well with a bomb implant killing Keri Russell and leaving questions. The current IMF team snatch the dude she was after but hey, he has a friend in the IMF. Things go south, the team steals the rabbit foot macguffin as Hunts new wife is held hostage.

JJ Abrams directorial debut comes with a good bolt of energy the previous film lack. Those first couple minutes from thenflash forwqrd are intense. Still, after a strong first the film kind of lacks. Setting its best set pieces before the third act. Also this film moves deeper into pure action territory, only playing up spycraft when convenient. MI2 made spycraft boring and took out the thrills, this overcompensated the action. Still, a step up from the sequel but weaker than the first. Plus, Tom Cruise has his best MI hairstyle in this. The movie gets a con in the lack of Simon Pegg. Laurence Fishburne is good in it and Philip Seymour Hoffman as well.

Against my better judgement put o the fourth film, Ghost Protocol. I told myself I would never do 4 in a day again. This one as Ethan Hunt extracted from Russian prison. An IMF agent is killed while securing a package. Now the team has to secure more intel on target Cobalt. Things go wrong, really wrong. Now Hunt and his three person team have to save the world from nuclear destruction at the hands of Cobalt.

MI4 is almost it. Its a tad under the first one and a tad ahead of the third. The stunt set pieces are more elaborate, action bigger and a good integration of spycraft. Like the high tech infiltration of the Kremlin for example. Brad Bird, in his first live action film, delivers a very strong action spy film. Promoting Simon Pegg as the field agent tech guy was a smart move. Paula Patton is good too, sadly not in the films after this. Still, the story lacks a little umph. Its like the other two films except the third picture had a more interesting bad guy. Michael Nyqvist feels a bit wasted. Still, for the weakness of the story the scope of the film, action and stunt work make it a fun ride. This film also features uncredited rewrites from Christopher McQuarrie who would helm the next two pictures. The best in the series?

[M:I Trailer / M:I 2 Trailer / M:I 3 Trailer / M:I Ghost Protocol Trailer]

DOUBLE FEATURE:January 18th-Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation from 2015 (Director/Writer: Christopher McQuarrie, Writers: Story by Drew Pearce and Based on Mission: Impossible by Bruce Geller, Stars: Tom Cruise, Cinematography: Robert Elswit, Runtime: 131 mins)

Mission: Impossible – Fallout from 2018 (Director/Writer: Christopher McQuarrie and Based on Mission: Impossible by Bruce Geller, Stars: Tom Cruise, Cinematography: Rob Hardy, Runtime: 147 mins)

The fifth and sixth Mission: Impossible work as a great double feature because they have the same mastermind. Solomon Lane, leader of the Syndicate. In Rogue Nation Ethan Hunt is operating solo as the IMF has been disbanded and CIA does not believe in the Syndicate. Eventually we get the team together plus a deep cover British Agent trying to stop Lane from accessing black budget funds to use for his operations. Fallout has Lanes agents causing hell all over the globe and Hunt and his team losing plutonium. Hunt has to work with a CIA operative to get it back but to do that, they have to break Lane out and trade him. Plus twists and turns in what is widely considered the best film in the series.

Christopher McQuarrie takes over writing and directing and doing so he makes Mission: Impossible into the acclaimed hit franchise it struggled to be. Before Ghost Protocol it was a modestly successful franchise, the fourth film gave the series a shot in the arm and these two take it next level. Rogue Nation opens big and has a number of fascinating set pieces mixing action and stunts with the high tech spycraft of the first film which was a struggle for the second and third film to a degree. Solomon Lane is a better bad guy then most of the MI bad guys outside 3. He is very well played by Sean Harris. Rebecca Ferguson adds a little mire mystery and style to the proceedings. Fallout capitalizes on the previous film. Angela Bassett is always a welcome sight and Henry Cavill gets to be in a successful film that utilizes his best talents. Outside of this film, his best movie is the under appreciated Man from UNCLE, another spy film based on a show. Like the fifth film, a number of big set pieces and while not as much spycraft, we have Ethan playing undercover. Plus the best staged op to get a confession since the first film.

Visually the film looks its best. They are paced their best. Though still a few minutes too long. I still think they can cut six or so minutes and make the final action pieces tighter. I also think Cruise gives his best performances in these two films. On another note, I kind of feel like these play best on a big screen in a dark theater. Finally, I don’t agree Fallout is the best action film of the 2010s, but I think the franchise has a stake in being called one of the best action franchises of the 2010s.

I watched them all, now more than year until the next one.

They sound the best. They

[M:I Rogue Nation Trailer / M:I Fallout Trailer]

January 19th-An American In Paris from 1951 (Director: Vincente Minnelli, Writers: Alan Jay Lerner, Stars: Gene Kelly, Leslie Caron, Oscar Levant, Georges Guétary, and Nina Foch, Cinematography: Alfred Gilks, Runtime: 115 mins)

The story of an American trying to make it as an artist in Paris. His friend is a concert pianist, his new friend is a performer, and he soon meets a woman who wants to help him out. Probably more. However this Jerry Mulligan spies a beautiful young woman named Lise and convinces her to see him. They begin to fall for each other but she is the fiance of the French singer Jerry only recently meet.

Now I start every film as a level of wanting to enjoy it. At three stars, going up or down depends on the flick. About ten or so minutes in I was at a five. The humor, the photography, Leslie Carons introduction, all the colors, the dancing and especially that opening diner number. The film dipped a tad here and there but ended at a five. It is fantastic. A film that I had been not sure if I was interested in but I went with my grandma to see it on the big screen and wow. What a movie.

The supporting cast is on point. Adam Cook is funny, Georges Guétary is filled with so much enthusiasm, and Nina Foch is effective in her role as Milo. This film has some some great comic moments, had me laughing. The visual and scope is impressive. The locations are great and stylish. People loved big colors back in the day and half the films today want to wash them all out. I don’t get it. The numbers-the songs themselves are less important than the showmanship. They are perfectly staged pieces that captivate. The composer sequence is great even if its meaningless. The almost twenty minute silent musical segment is stunning with the painted backgrounds, props, art, dancers and Kelly and Caron doing their thing.

This film is the best I have seen this month and a while.

[Leslie Caron Dance Sequence]

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365 Days of Film in 2019-Top 127 Films, Links, Stats and Lists

Number of Films Watched in 2019
527 Total
437 First Viewing
90 Rewatch

Top 127

This list represents movies I ranked 4 stars or higher. I gave a lot of 3 to 3½ stars. 252 specifically. That means 149 movies ranging from ½ to 2½.

1. Rear Window*
2. The Public Enemy
3. The Night of the Hunter*
4. Notorious*
5. Witness For The Prosecution
6. Stray Dog*
7. The Handmaiden*
8. Philadelphia Story*
9. Strawberry Blonde
10. Citizen Kane
11. Superman*
12. Us
13. Once Upon A Time In Hollywood
14. One Cut of the Dead
15. Born Yesterday
16. The Best Years Of Our Lives
17. Fury
18. Wife vs. Secretary
19. Bringing Up Baby
20. Knives Out
21. Redline (2009 Anime Film)
22. The Wizard of Oz*
23. Cape Fear (1962)
24. The Bride of Frankenstein*
25. Strangers on a Train*
26. Sudden Fear
27. M (1931)
28. Parasite
29. In A Lonely Place
30. You and Me
31. Too Late For Tears
32. Dementia
33. Gun Crazy
34. Libeled Lady
35. Vivacious Lady
36. Sullivan’s Travels
37. Eyes Without A Face
38. The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
39. Logan
40. Manchurian Candidate
41. Frankenstein*
42. Tokyo Drifter
43. The Final Girls
44. Hobo With A Shotgun*
45. Saboteur*
46. Sabrina
47. Roman Holiday
48. Gentlemen Prefer Blondes
49. Maltese Falcon
50. Dolemite Is My Name
51. Freaks
52. 12 Angry Men*
53. The Naked City
54. Rocketman
55. The Killing
56. The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
57. Bumblebee
58. Ready or Not
59. Miracle on 34th Street
60. My Young Auntie
61. One, Two, Three
62. Hollywood Shuffle*
63. Carnival of Souls*
64. Zodiac
65. Nightmare Alley
66. Key Largo
67. Judy
68. Murder On The Orient Express
69. Some Like It Hot
70. Blood and Black Lace
71. Tigers Are Not Afraid
72. Black Cat (1934)*
73. House of Wax
74. Carrie
75. The Bad Seed
76. Shazam!
77. Sudden Death
78. One Armed Swordsman
79. The Grapes of the Wrath
80. Tales From The Crypt: Demon Knight*
81. A League of Their Own*
82. Night and the City
83. Pickup On South Street
84. Joker
85. Avengers: Endgame
86. Sunset Boulevard
87. Yojimbo
88. Johnny Guitar
89. Petrified Forest
90. Palm Beach Story
91. Christmas Evil
92. Shadow of a Doubt*
93. Invader Zim: Enter the Florpus
94. The Invisible Man
95. To Die For
96. Crawl
97. Cooley High
98. Spider-Man: Far From Home
99. Manhunter
100. Lifeboat*
101. Straight-Jacket
102. Angels With Dirty Faces
103. Black Sunday*
104. A Kiss Before Dying
105. Gone with the Wind
106. Seconds
107. Asphalt Jungle
108. The Sound of Music
109. Crazy Rich Asians
110. House
111. Tammy and the T-Rex
112. The Wrong Man*
113. Pitfall
114. Woman in the Window
115. Casablanca*
116. The Lady Vanishes
117. Once Upon A Time in The West
118. Dance, Girl, Dance (1940)
119. JCVD
120. The Brain That Wouldn’t Die
121. All The Colors of the Dark
122. Liquid Sky
123. Charlies Angels (2019)
124. Three Days of the Condor
125. Anna and the Apocalypse
126. What Have You Done to Solange?
127. Your Vice Is A Locked Room and Only I Have the Key

Bottom 5 Films
5. Toxic Avenger II*
4. The Undead
3. The Candy Snatchers
3. Santa Claus Conquers the Martians
2. Student Bodies
1. Attack of the Killer Tomatoes

* Rewatched

Now the boring stuff. Average monthly ratings, various links, stats, cast and crew, etc.

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Previous Months Links, Rankings & Stats
January, February, March, April, May, June, July, August, September, October, November, December

Monthly Average Rating
The original averages and updated averages.

January Original: 3.15 out of 5
Half Way Point Updated: 3.18 out of 5
End of Year Updated: 3.29 out of 5
32 Watched / 29 New / 3 Revisited

February Original: 3.3 out of 5
Half Way Point Updated: no change
End of Year Updated: 3.35 out of 5
31 Watched / 28 New / 3 Revisited

March Original: 3.36 out of 5
Half Way Point Updated: 3.38 out of 5
End of Year Updated: No Change
36 Watched / 30 New / 6 Revisit

April Original: 2.9 out of 5
Half Way Point Updated: No Change
End of Year Updated: No Change
33 Watched / 33 New / 0 Revisited

May Original: 3.43 out of 5
Half Way Point Updated: 3.51 out of 5
End of Year Updated: 3.6 out of 5
39 Watched / 26 New / 13 Revisited

June Original: 3.06 out of 5
End of Year Updated: 3.08 out of 5
47 Watched / 42 New / 5 Revisited

July Original: 3.07 out of 5
End of Year Updated: 3.1 out of 5
45 Watched / 29 New / 16 Revisited

August: 3.13 out of 5
End of Year Updated: 3.15 out of 5
56 Watched / 41 New / 15 Revisited

September: 3.3 out of 5
End of Year Updated: No Change
58 Watched / 53 New / 5 Revisited

October: 3.06 out of 5
End of Year Updated: No Change
55 Watched / 51 New / 4 Revisited

November: 3.11 out of 5
55 Watched / 33 New / 12 Revisited

December: 3.06 out of 5
46 Watched / 42 New / 4 Revisited

AFI Top 100 Films
Listed From Top of the List to Bottom of the List

Seen: Citizen Kane, Godfather, Casablanca, Raging Bull, Singing in the Rain, Gone with the Wind, Schindler’s List, Vertigo, The Wizard of Oz, Star Wars, Psycho, 2001: A Space Odyssey, Sunset Boulevard, The Graduate*, On The Waterfront, It’s A Wonderful Life, Chinatown, Some Like It Hot, The Grapes of Wrath, E.T.: The Extra-Terrestrial, To Kill A Mockingbird, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, High Noon, All About Eve, Double Indemnity, Apocalypse Now, Maltese Falcon, Godfather Part II, Snow White and the Seven Dwarves, The Best Years of the Live, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, Dr. Strangelove, The Sound of Music, King Kong, Bonnie and Clyde, Midnight Cowboy, Philadelphia Story, It Happened One Night, A Streetcar Named Desire, Rear Window, West Side Story*, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, Taxi Driver, North By Northwest, Jaws, Nashville, Duck Soup, Sullivan’s Travel, American Graffiti, Network, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, A Clockwork Orange, The Silence of the Lambs, In The Heat of the Night, Forrest Gump, The Apartment, Spartacus, Titanic, A Night at the Opera, Platoon, 12 Angry Men, Bringing Up Baby, The Sixth Sense, Swing Time, French Connection, Pulp Fiction, Do the Right Thing*, Blade Runner, Toy Story

*Seen In School, Probably Need To Rewatch

Unseen: Lawrence of Arabia, City Lights, The Searchers, The General, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Annie Hall, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Shane, Intolerance, The Deer Hunter, MASH, Rocky, The Gold Rush, Cabaret, The African Queen, The Unforgiven, Tootsie, Saving Private Ryan, The Shawshank Redemption, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, All the President’s Men, Modern Times, The Wild Bunch, Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans, Easy Rider, Sophie’s Choice, Goodfellas, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Ben-Hur
(List made before 2020)

Cast and Crew By The Numbers
This Is An Incomplete List
All Names Are Actors Unless Otherwise Noted
Includes Archival Footage-Clips of a film with an actor were used in another film. For example, James Cagney movie plays in Fade to Black and are used as story elements in Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid.

Twenty-Four Films: Edith Head (Costume/Wardrobe), Cedric Ribbons (Production Design)

Twenty-Three Films: Bess Flowers (Queen of Extras),

Twenty Films: Alfred Hitchcock (Master of Suspense),

Nineteen Films: Cary Grant (Includes Archival Footage),

Seventeen Films: Jean Harlow, Lyle R. Wheeler (Production Design),

Sixteen Films: Franz Waxman (Composer),

Fifteen Films: Adrian (Costume/Wardrobe), Humphrey Bogart (Includes Archival Footage),

Fourteen Films: Mel Berns (Make-Up), Wally Westmore (Make-Up),

Thirteen Films: Ben Hecht (Writer), Perc Westmore (Make-Up),

Twelve: Cyril J. Mockride (Composer),

Eleven Films: Joan Crawford (Includes Archival Footage), James Stewart,

Ten Films: Irene (Costume/Wardrobe), John Carradine, Roger Corman (Director/Actor), Clark Gable, Howard Hawks (Director), Eugene Joseff (Costume/Wardrobe), Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Jack P. Pierce (Make-Up), Max Steiner (Composer),

Nine Films: Orry-Kelly (Costume/Wardrobe), Mario Bava (Director/Writer/Cinematography), Ward Bond, Henry Fonda, Carole Lombard, Dick Miller, Bert Moorhouse, Alfred Newman (Composer), Ben Nye (Make-Up), Hal Pereira (Production Design), Vincent Price (Includes Archival Footage),

Eight Films: Gino Corrado, Jules Furthman (Writer), Stephen King (Novelist), Charles Lang (Cinematographer), Fritz Lang (Director/Writer), Michael Mark, Marilyn Monroe, Van Nest Polglase (Production Design), Harold Rosson (Cinematographer), Miklos Rozsa (Composer), Arthur Tovey, Vera West (Costume/Wardrobe), Billy Wilder (Director/Writer),

Seven Films: Lionell Atwill, Lucien Ballard (Cinematographer), Ralph Bellamy, James Cagney (Including Archival Footage), Leo G. Carroll, Jack Carson, Carroll Clark (Production Design), Bette Davis (Includes Archival Footage), Arthur Edeson (Cinematography), Hugo Friedhofer (Composer), Porter Hall, Colin Kenny, Ted J. Kent (Editor), John Leipold (Composer), Peter Lorre, Daniel Mandell (Editor), Frank McLure, Ray Milland (Includes Archival Footage), John Qualan, Dorothy Spencer (Editor), Bert Stevens, Travilla (Costumes), Jean Claude Van Damme, Roy Webb (Composer),

Six Films: Edward Arnold (Includes Archival Footage), Mary Astor, Lauren Bacall, Martin Balsam, William Bendix, Wade Boteler, Walter Brennan, Robert Burks (Cinematography), Louis Calhern, Lon Chaney Jr., Spencer Charters, Charles Coburn, Elisha Cook Jr, George Cukor (Director), Jack Dawn (Make-Up), William Demarest, Pat Flaherty, Leland Fuller (Production Design), Edward Gargan, Lee Garmes (Cinematography), Charles D. Hall (Production Design), Charles Halton, Theresa Harris, Audrey Hepburn, Edward Everett Horton, James Wong Howe (Cinematography), John Huston (Director/Writer), George Kennedy, Milton Krasner (Cinematography), Charles Lane, Doris Lloyd, Jean Louis (Costume/Wardrobe), Ernst Lubitsch (Director), Joseph MacDonald (Cinematography), Rudolph Maté (Cinematography/Director), Hattie McDaniel, Una Merkal, Franklin Pangborn, Gregory Peck, Edgar Allan Poe (Writer/Inspiration), Heinz Roemheld (Composer), Ginger Rogers, Barbara Steele, Harry Stradling Sr. (Cinematography), Frank Sullivan (Editor), Ted Tetzlaff (Cinematography), Gene Tierney, Spencer Tracy, Norma Varden, Joseph Walker (Cinematography),

Five Films: Wesley Addy, Dana Andrews, Gertrude Astor, Colleen Atwood (Costume/Wardrobe), William Axt (Composer), Irving Bacon, Frank Baker, William Benedict, Charles Bennett (Writer), Marlon Brando, George Chandler, Jimmy Conlin, Jack Conway (Director), Harry Cording, Jeff Corey, Marcel Dailo, IAL Diamond (Writer), Ann Doran, Mary Field, George J. Folsey (Cinematography), Stuart Freeborn (Make-Up), Dwight Frye, Steven Geray, Charley Grapwin, Ernest Haller (Cinematography), Leigh Harline (Composer), Harry Hayden, Rita Hayworth, Katherine Hepburn, Holmes Herbert, Bernard Herrmann (Composer), James Wong Howe (Cinematography), Samuel L. Jackson, Isabel Jewell, Henry Jones (Archival Footage Included), Ray June (Cinematography), Roscoe Karns, Alan Ladd (Includes Archival Footage), Veronica Lake (Includes Archival Footage), Charles Laughton (Actor/Director/Includes Archival Footage), Charles Lederer (Writer), John Litel, Arthur Loft, Myrna Loy, Anita Loos (Writer), Barton MacLane, John Lee Mahin (Writer), Edwin Maxwell, Matt McHugh, Torben Meyer, Thomas Mitchell, Robert Mitchum, Barboura Morris, Alan Mowbray, Nicholas Musuraca (Cinematography), Robert Emmett O’Connor, Una O’Connor, Moroni Olsen, Garry Owen, Eugene Pallette, Nat Pendleton, Walter Plunkett (Costumes), Sol Polito (Cinematography), William Powell, Claude Rains, Thelma Ritter, George Robinson (Cinematography), Sig Ruman, Jeff Sayre, Arthur P. Schmidt (Editor), John F. Seitz (Editor), Blanche Sewell (Editor), Leon Shamroy (Cinematography), Sylvia Sidney, Jo Swerling (Writer), Dimitri Tiomkin (Composer), George Tomasini (Editor), Fred ‘Snowflake’ Toones, Jacques Tourneur (Director), Geoffrey Unsworth (Cinematography), Ellinor Vanderveer, Robert Warwick, James Whale (Director), Richard Widmark, John Williams (The Actor Not The Composer), Chill Wills, Robert Wise (Director/Editor/Sound Design), Victor Young (Composer),

Four Films: Frank Albertson, Murray Alper, Morris Ankrum, Dario Argento (Director/Writer), Stuart Baird (Editor), George Bassman (Composer), George Barnes (Cinematograhy), John Barry (Composer), Don Beddoe, Gordon Bau (Make-Up), Les Baxter (Composer), Ned Beatty, Louis Beavers, Brooks Benedict, Marjorie Bennett, Ingrid Bergman, Charles Bernstein (Composer), Billy Bevan, Kent Beyda (Editor), Clara Blandick, Joan Blondell, Eric Blore, Rudy Bond, Beaulah Bondi, Egon Brecher, Charles Bronson, W.R. Burnett (Writer), Frank Capra (Director), James B. Clark (Editor), EE Clive, Claudette Colbert, Joyce Compton, Gary Cooper, Alec Craig, Laird Cregar, Floyd Crosby (Cinematography), Jack Curtis, Jane Darwell, Ted De Corsia, Hubert De Givenchy (Costumes), Richard Deacon, Adolph Deutsch (Composer), Robert Di Niro, Marlene Dietrich, Jean Dixon, Ruth Donnelly, Jay Dratler (Writer), Dan Duryea, Frank Ferguson, Victor Fleming (Director), John Ford (Director), Wallace Ford, Lance Fuller, Jeff Goldblum, Mary Gordon, Lawrence Grant, Robert Grieg, Charles B. Griffith (Writer), Moses Gunn, Sam Harris, Joan Harrison (Writer), Forrester Harvey, Paul Harvey, Gene Havlick (Editor), William Holden, John Hoyt, Paul Hurst, Olaf Hytten, Carolyn Jones, Fred J. Koenekamp (Cinematography), Norman Krasna (Writer), Stanley Kubrick (Director/Writer/Producer), Elsa Lanchester, Joseph LaShelle (Cinematography), Ernest Laszlo (Cinematography), Anna Lee, Christopher Lee (with Archive footage), Ernest Lehman (Writer), William Levanway (Editor), Gene Lockhart, Otho Lovering (Editor), Dolph Lundgren, Ida Lupino, Fred MacMurray (Includes Archival Footage), Owen Marks (Editor), Hugh Marlowe, Mae Marsh, Strother Martin, Raymond Massey, Joel McCrea, Roddy McDowall, Russell Metty (Cinematographer), Vicente Minnelli (Director), Dickie Moore, Frank Morgan, Ennio Morricone (Composer), Lionel Newman (Composer), Daria Nicolodi, Edmond O’Brien, Robert Emmett O’Connor, Ann O’Neal, Reginald Owen, Jack Palance, Inez Palange, Lee Patrick, Dorothy Peterson, Tyrone Power, Andre Previn (Composer), Merrill Pye (Production Design), George Raft, Ivan Rassimov, Gene Raymond, Joseph Ruttenberg (Cinematography), Walter Sande, George Sanders, Erskine Sanford, Mario Serandrei (Editor), Harry Shannon, Ann Sheridan, Curt Siodmark (Writer), Frank Skinner (Composer), Howard St. John, Larry Steers, Donald Ogden Stewart (Writer), Lewis Stone, Woody Strode, Preston Sturges (Director/Writer), Ubaldo Terzano (Cinematography), Gregg Toland (Cinematography), Franchot Tone, Robert Townsend, Edgar G. Ulmer (Director/Production Design/Costumes), Joseph A. Valentine (Cinematography), H.B. Warner, John Wayne, Paul Weatherwax (Editor), Richard Webb, Ferris Webster (Editor), Bud Westmore (Make-Up), Larry Wheat, Ernest Whitman, Florence Wix, Will Wright, William Wyler, Kennan Wynn, Nedrick Young,

Three Films: Dorothy Adams, Robert Aldrich (Director), Henri Alekan, Kirk Alyn, Eddie ‘Rochester’ Anderson, Richard Anderson, Fred Astaire, George Axelrod (Writer), Fay Bainter, Lucille Ball, George Bancroft, Bobby Barber, George Barbier, Don Barclay, Harry Barris, Billy Barty, Louise Beavers, Lionel Belmore, Gregg Berger, Elmer Bernstein (Composer), Ted Billings, Whit Bissell, Oliver Blake, Monte Blue, Sammy Blum, Willis Bouchey, Charles Brackett, Neville Brand, Edward Bredell (Cinematography), Felix Bressart, Al Bridge, Clarence Brown, Barbara Brown, Robert Brown, Sidney Buchman (Writer), Frederick Burton, Spring Byington, Frank Cady, James M. Cain (Writer), Leonard Carey, Milton Carruth (Editor), Walter Catlett, Nora Cecil, Raymond Chandler (Novelist/Screenwriter), Don Cheadle, Candy Clark, Matt Clark, Wallis Clark, Mae Clarke, Dora Clement, Ruth Clifford, Chester Clute, Tony Curtis, David Clyde, Emmett Cogan, Ray Collins, Chester Conklin, Sean Connery, Frank Conroy, Albert Conti, Ellen Corby, Maurice Costello, Joseph Cotton, George Coulouris, Hazel Court, Brian Cox, Jack E. Cox (Cinematohraphy), John Cromwell (Director), Hume Cronyn, Jamie Lee Curtis, Michael Curtiz (Director), Henry Daniell, Harry Davenport, Delmer Daves (Writer), Geena Davis, Anthony Dawson, Doris Day, William H. Daniels (Cinematography), Olivia De Havilland, Gustavo De Nardo, Frank De Vol (Composer), Rob Delaney, William Demarest, Richard Denning, Harry Depp, Bruce Dern, Eddie Dew, Jean Dixon, Richard Donner (Director), Kirk Douglas (Includes Archival Footage), Melvyn Douglas, Elspeth Dudgeon, George Duning (Composer), Julius and Philip Epstein (Writer), Leif Erickson, Edith Evanson, Tom Ewell, Antonio Fargas, Don Fellows, Giancarlo Ferrando (Conematography), Charles Fleischer, Ian Fleming (Novelist), Rhonda Fleming, John Fiedler, Glenn Ford, Hugh S. Fowler (Editor), Franco Fraticelli (Editor), Paul Frees, Beverly Garland, Judy Garland, Oliver H.P. Garrett (Writer), Spencer Garrett, Ernesto Gastaldi (Writer), John George, Stuart Gilmore (Editor), James Gleason, John Glover, Gloria Grahme, Charles Gross Jr. (Editor), Clu Gulager, Edmund Gwenn, Sara Haden, Jean Hagen, Jonathon Hale, Murray Hamilton, Mark Hanna (Writer), Russell Harlan (Cinematography), Hugo Hass (Director/Writer/Actor), Sterling Hayden, John Michael Hayes (Writer), Patrica Hayes, Jonathan Haze, John Heldabrand, Fay Helm, Darryl Hickman, Howard C. Hickman, Sidney Hickox (Cinematography), Jack Hill (Director), Leyand Hodgson, Edmund Holding (Writer and Director), Friedrich Hollaender (Composer), Tim Holt, Miriam Hopkins, John Houseman, Olin Howland, Brandon Hurst, Walter Huston, Warren Hymer, Howard Jackson (Composer), Maurice Jarre (Composer), Allen Jenkins, Scarlett Johansson, Nunnally Johnson (Writer), Russell Johnson, Victor Julian, Bert Glennon (Cinematography), Mary Gordon, Roy Gordon, Garson Kanin, Elia Kazan (Director), Brian Keith, Barry Kelley, Mike Kellin, Grace Kelly, Tom Kennedy, June Kenney, Erle C. Kenton (Director), Hal C. Kern (Editor), Donald Kerr, Guy Kibbee, Margot Kidder, Nicole Kidman, Aron Kincaid, Henry Kolker, Alma Kruger, Philip H. Lathrop (Cinematography), Marc Lawrence, Richard Lawson, Jack Lemmon, Louis Levy (Composer), Joseph H. Lewis (Director), John Lithgow, Louis R. Loeffler (Editor), Lionel London (Cinematography), Herbert Lom, Ray Lovejoy (Editor), Michael Luciano (Editor), Sidney Lumet (Director), George Lynn, Donald MacBride, John McGiver, Matty Malneck (Composer), Marjorie Main, Joseph L. Mankiewicz (Writer), Hank Mann, Herbert Marshall, Archie Marshek (Editor), Grouco Marx, Lois Maxwell, Mike Mazurki, Leo McCarthy (Director/Writer), Butterfly McQueen, Edward McWade, Harriet Medin, Beryl Mercer, John J. Mescall (Cinematography), John Miljin, Hayley Mills, Victor Milner (Cinematography), Grant Mitchell, Jack Montgomery, Cleo Moore, Andre Morell, Adrian Morris, Charles R. Moore, Clarence Muse, J. Carroll Nash, Noel Neil, William Newell, Alfred Newman (Composer), Bruno Nicolai (Composer), Roberto Nicolosi (Composer), Marni Nixon, Alex North (Composer), Edgar Norton, Pat O’Brien, Maureen O’Hara, Frank Orth, Maria Ouspenskaya, Rick Overton, Anthony Perkins, Otto Perminger (Director), Nehemiah Persoff, Luciano Pigozzi, Franz Planer (Cinematography), Donald Pleasence, Christopher Plummer, John Posey, William Prince, Denver Pyle, Tony Randall, Samson Raphaelson (Writer), Gregory Ratoff, John Ratzenberger, Leoda Richards, John Ridgely, Massimo Righi, Roy Roberts, William Roberts (Writer), Hugh A. Robertson (Editor), May Robson, Howard Emmett Rogers (Writer), Donald R. Rondell, Hayden Rorke, Richard Roundtree, Deep Roy, Mark Ruffalo, Kurt Russell, Carlo Rustichelli, Tim Ryan, Waldo Salt (Writer), Hans J. Salter (Composer), Telly Savalas, Joe Sawyer, Sauro Scavolini (Writer), Palo Schifrin (Composer), Gus Schilling, Lizabeth Scott, Ralph Von Seyffertitz, Dan Seymour, Anita Sharp-Bolster, Jack Sholder (Director/Editor), Leo Shunken (Composer), Henry Silva, Jay Silverheels, Robert L. Simpson, Russell Simpson, Frank Sinatra, C. Aubrey Smith, Terrance Stamp, Wyndham Standing, Barbara Stanwyck (Includes Archival Footage), Ronald Stein (Composer), Henry Stephenson, Josef Von Sternberg (Director), George Stevens (Director), Patrick Stewart, George E. Stone, Harold J. Stone, Herbert Stothart (Composer), Glenn Strange, Donald Sutherland, Julius Tannen, Holland Taylor, Philip Tonge, Regis Toomey, Leo Tover (Cinematography), Arthur Tovey, William Tracy, Henry Travers, Claire Trevor, Dalton Trumbo (Writer), Burnell Tucker, Brian Tyler (Composer), Tom Tyler, Alida Valli, John Vernon (includes Archival Footage), Bruno VeSota (Actor/Writer), Christopher Walken, Walter Walker, Eli Wallach, Raoul Walsh (Director), Edward Ward (Composer), Rachel Ward, David Wayne, Damon Waynes, Mel Welles, Pat West, O.Z. Whitehead, Cornel Wilde, John Williams (Composer), Ian Wolfe, John Wray, Christopher Young (Composer), Robert Young, William H. Zeigler,

Two Films: Ann-Margret, Walter Abel, Enrique Acosta, Eddie Acuff, Brooke Adams, Eddie Albert, John Alcott (Cinematography), Fred Aldrich, Scott Alexander (Writer), Maxine Alexandre (Cinematography), Nancy Allen, John Alton, Leon Ames, Arthur Anderson, Mary Anderson, Judith Anderson, Stanley Andrews, Heather Angel, Edward Anhalt (Writer), Evelyn Ankers, George Antheil (Composer), Eve Arden, Maurice Argent, Arthur A. Arling (Cinematography), Jean Arthur, Dorothy Arzner (Director), Roscoe Ates, Edith Atwater, Georges Auric (Composer), Leah Ayers, Lew Ayres, Jim Backus, Diane Baker, Lynn Baggett, Raymond Bailey, Ann Bancroft, Elizabeth Banks (Actor/Director/Writer), Raymond J. Barry, Lionel Barrymore, George Barton, Walter Bason, Albert Bassermann, Jacob Batalon, Tyler Bates (Composer), Hubert Bath (Composer), L. Frank Baum (Novelist), David Baxt, Barbara Bel Geddes, Wallace Beery, Ed Begley, Hank Bell, James Bell, Robert Benchley, Robert Russell Bennet (Composer), Sally Benson (Writer), Henry Berman (Editor), Clem Bevans, Roger Beverly, Lynette Bernay, Alberto Bevilacqua (Writer), A.I. Bezzerides (writer), Theodore Bikel, Peter Billingsley, Herman Bing, Ole Bratt Birkeland (Writer), Joseph F. Biroc (Cinematography), Jacqueline Bisset, Larry J. Blake, Ronee Blakely, Betty Blythe, Sydney Boehm (Writer), George Boemler (Editor), Beaulah Bondi, Nancy Borgenicht, Ernest Borgnine, Matthew Boulton, George Bowler (Editor), George Bowers (Editor), Charles Boyer, Lovyss Bradly, Leigh Brackett (writer), Charles Bradshaw (Composer), Jocelyn Brando, Maryann Brandon (Editor), Elwood Bredell (Cinematography), George Brent, Helen Broderick, Norbert Brodine (Cinematography), Adam Brody, James Brolin, Hilary Brooke, Leslie Brooks, Hilary Brooke, Charles D. Brown, Peter Brown, Tod Browning (Director), Mae Bruce, Nigel Bruce, Horst Buchholz, Jan Buckingham, Victor Buono, Billie Burke, Joe Burke, Raymond Burr, Norman Burton, Tony Burton, Francis X. Bushman Jr., W.R. Burnett (Writer), Tim Burton (Director/Art Design), David Buttolph (Composer), Stephen H. Burum (Cinematographer), Dan Butler, James Caan, Susan Cabot, John Call, Charles Cane, Truman Capote (Writer), Hoagy Carmichael, Morris Carnovsky, Jack Carr, Anthony Carras (Editor), Lynn Cartwright, Antony Caruso, Bernie Casey, Agatha Christie (Novelist/Stage Writer), Claire Carleton, John Carpenter (Director/Writer/Composer/Editor), Maeline Carroll, Frances Carson, Bernie Casey, William Castle (Director), Wheaton Chamers, George Chandler, Lilyan Chauvin, Lita Chevret, Ken Christy, Eduardo Ciannelli, Al Clark (Editor), Bob Clark (Director/Writer), Fred Clark, James B. Clark (Editor), Marlene Clark, Mae Clarke, Curtiss Clayton (Editor), John Cleese, Colin Clive, Anne V. Coates (Editor), Lee J. Cobb, James Coburn, Lenore J. Coffee, Larry Cohen (Director/Writer), Tom Coleman, Heine Conklin, Derek Connolly (Writer), Walter Connolly, Russ Conway, Tom Conway, Elisha Cook Jr., Charles Cooper, Gladys Cooper, Jeane Cooper, Melville Cooper, Maxine Cooper, Tex Cooper, Wendell Corey, Mariclae Costello, Jospeh Cotton, Inez Courtney, Jerome Cowan, Tony Cox, David Cronenberg (Director/Actor), Edward Cronjager (Cinematography), Jerome Cowen, Robert Cummings, Peggy Cummins, Edward Curtis, Sidney Cutner (Composer), Charles Cyphers, Howard Da Silva, Mark Dacascos, Willen Dafoe, Royal Dano, Joe Dante, Sonia Darrin, Linda Darnell, William B. Davidson, William Davis, Laraine Day, Jules Dassin (Director), Jean De Briac, Robert De Grasse (Cinematography), Buck DeMaggio (Editor), Andre De Toth, Albert Dekker, Viña Delmar (Writer), Nick Dennis, Reginald Denny, Brad Dextor, Khigh Dhiegh, Dante DiPaolo, Dick Dickinson, Robert Emmett Dolan (Composer), Arturo Dominici, Pino Donaggio (Composer), Illeana Douglas, Sarah Douglas, Doris Dowling, Cathy Downs, Robert Downey Jr., Betsy Drake (Actor/Writer), Bob Ducsay (Editor), Howard Duff, Tommy Duggan, Margaret Dumont, Faye Dunaway, Emma Dunn, Michael J. Duthie (Editor), Robert Duvall, Shelley Duvall, Clint Eastwood, James Edwards, Robert S. Eisen (Editor), Jack Elam, Danny Elfman (Composer), James Ellison, Isobel Elsom, John Emery, Fern Emmett, Estelle Etterre, Chris Evans, Rex Evans, Francis Edward Faragoh (Writer), Dennis Farina, William Faulkner (Writer), Nat Faxon, Adrienne Fazan (Editor), Rudi Fehr (Editor), Edwige Fenech, Gabriele Ferzetti, Verna Fields (Editor), Steve Fisher (Writer), Barry Fitzgerald, Paul Fix, Joe Flood, Elizabeth Flourney, George Buck Flower, George J. Foley (Cinematography), Marcello Fondato (Writer), Joan Fontaine, Luis Forbes (Composer), Francis Ford, Gleen Ford, Robert Forster, Romana Fortini (Editor), Byron Foulger, Almeda Fowler, Scott Frank (Writer), Benjamin Franke (Composer), Christopher Franke (Composer), John Frankenheimer (Director), Bert Freed, Helen Freeman, Charles Frend (Editor), Gerald Fried (Composer), Edward Furlong, Reginald Gardiner, Tay Garnett (Director), John Gavin, Ernest L. Glesey (Writer), Gladys George, Merritt B. Gerstad (Cinematography), Frank Gerstle, John Gieguld, Billy Gilbert, Tom Gilmore, Vaughan Glaser, Scott Glenn, Willis Goldbeck (Writer), Mark Goldblatt (Editor), William Goldenberg (Editor), Jerry Goldsmith (Composer), Lisa Golm, Minna Gomball, Eiza Gonzalez, Gavin Gordon, Walter Gotell, David Goyer (Writer), Betty Grable, Richard E. Grant, Colleen Gray, Jack Dylan Grazer, Clarence Greene (Writer), Grahme Greene (Writer), Sydney Greenstreet, James Gregory, Pam Grier, Kathy Griffin, Harry Guardino, Burnett Guffey (Cinematography), Luis Guzman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Greta Gynt, Robert Haines, Alan Hale, Victor Halperin (Director), Margaret Hamilton, William Hamilton (Editor), Dashiel Hammett (Novelist), Nicholas Hammond, Cedric Hardwicke, Lumsden Hare, W. Franke Harling (Composer), Rand Harper, Marilyn Harris, Rex Harrison, Henry Hathaway (Director), Rutger Hauer, Martha Hayer, Allison Hayes, Margaret Hayes, Dan Hedaya, David Hemmings, Lance Henrickson, Buck Henry, Michael Herz (Director), Werner R. Heymann (Composer), Remy Hii, Walter Hill (Director/Writer), Brent Hinkley, Hsiao Ho, Monckton Hodge (Writer), Samuel Hoffenstein, Tom Holland (Director/Writer), Judy Holliday, Earl Holliman, John Hollis, Celeste Holm, Jack Holt, Mark Holton, Oskar Homolka, Lena Horne, James Horner (Composer), Djimon Hounsou, Leslie Howard, Ron Howard (Director/Actor), Rochelle Hudson, Rock Hudson, Ken Hughes (Director), Frank E. Hull (Editor), Henry Hull, Alan Hume (Cinematography), Holly Hunter, Leila Hyams, Peter Hyams (Cinemtography/Director), Rex Ingram, Michael Ironside, Robert Ito, Paul Ivano (Cinematography), Brion James, Gladden James, Elton John (Singer/Actor), Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Dean Jones, Freddie Jones, Grace Jones, Darwin Joston, Nathan H. Juran (Director/Writer), Lampros Kalfuntzos, MacKinley Kantor (Writer), Bronislau Kaper (Composer), Larry Karaszewski (Writer), Boris Kaufman (Cinematography), Lloyd Kaufman (Director/Writer), Bernhard Kaun (Composer), Edward Keane, Michael Keaton, Cecil Kellaway, Nancy Kelly (Archival Footage Included), Arthur Kennedy, Ken Kercheval, jerome Kern (Composer), Deborah Kerr, Charles Kevin (Composer), Evelyn Keyes, Gary B. Kibbe (Cinematography), Udo Kier, Patrick Kilpatrick, Aton Kincaid, Tony King, Leonid Kinsky, Werner Klemperer, Bernard Knowles (Cinematography), Patric Knowles, Clarence Kolb, Clarence Kolster (Editor), Rudolph G. Kopp (Composer), Carl Kress (Editor), Otto Krueger, Jack Kruschen, Sho Kosugi, Harry Kurnitz (Writer), Nancy Kyes, John La Mesurier, Hedy Lamarr, David Landau, Martin Landau, Priscilla Lane, Jessica Lange, Ring Lardner Jr., Bobby Larson, Sydney Lassick, John Latch, John Laurie, Piper Laurie, Gabriele Lavia, Viola Lawrence (Editor), Jeni Le Gon, William Leanway (Cinematography), Chris Lebenzon, James A. Lebovitz (Cinematographer), Raymond Lebotiz (Editor), Janet Leigh, Vivien Leigh, Virgina Leith, Kasi Lemmons, Richard LeParmentier, Joan Leslie, Henri Letondal Benn W. Levy (Writer), Harry Lewis, Howard Lindsay (Writer), Desmond Llewellyn, George Lloyd, Carol Locatell, Louis R. Loeffler (Editor), Donal Logue, Frank Lovejoy, Warren Low, Edward T. Lowe Jr., Carl Lumbly, James Luisi, George Lynn, William A. Lyon (Editor), Derek Lyons, George Burr Macannan, Ranald MacDougall (Writer), Robert MacLeod, Ben Maddow, Michael Madsen, Richard Maibaum (Writer), Karl Malden, Marini Malfatti, Albert Maltz (Writer), Henry Mancini (Composer), Tom Mankiewicz (Writer), Jayne Mansfield, Frederic March, Richard Marcus, Antonio Margheriti (Director), Michael Mark, E. G. Marshall, Jaeden Martell, Lee Marvin, Marino Mase, Jean Marsh, Oliver T. Marsh, Tully Marshall, Alphonse Martell, Helen Martin, Steve Martin (Actor/Writer), Arthur Martinelli (Cinematography), Lucien Martini (Writer), Sergio Martino (Director), Marx Bros (Chico and Harpo), John Mathieson (Cinematography), Victor Mature, James McAvoy, Kevin McCarthy, Marc McClure, Ted McCord (Cinematography), Patty McCormack (Archival Footage Included), Joel McCrea, Frances McDonald, John D. McDonald (Writer), Margaret McWade, James Kevin McGuinness (Writer), Edward Meade, Donald Meek, Ben Mendelsohn, Adolphe Menjou, Heather Menzies, Gary Merrill, Thomas Middleditch, Toshiro Mifune, Vera Miles, Gene Milford (Editor), John Milius (Writer), Kristine Miller, David Miller (Director), Lee Miller, Dan Mindel (Cinematography), Cameron Mitchell, Howard M. Mitchell, Laurie Mitchell, John Mitchum, Hayao Miyazaki (Director/Writer), Juanita Moore, Victor Moore, Agnes Moorehead, Baboura Morris, Patricia Morrow, Arthur Morton (Composer), Michael Murphy, Reggie Nalder, Alan Napier, Charles Napier, Howard Negley, Shawn Nelson, Cathleen Nesbitt, Dorothy Neumann, Alfred Newman (Composer), David and Leslie Newman (Writers), Dudley Nichols (Writer), Jack Nicholson, Leonard Nimoy, David Niven, Jeanette Nolan, Kim Novak, Philip Noyce (Director), Joseph Nussbaum (Composer), Christian Nyby (Editor), Lupita Nyong’o, William H. O’Brien, Kevin O’Conner, Martha O’Driscoll, Jack O’Halloran, Ryan O’Neal, Mika Orasmaa (Cinematography), James E. Newcom (Editor), Ed O’Ross, Oscar O’Shea, Ben Oakland (Composer), Ken Olandt, Laurence Olivier, Merritt Olsen, Frank Otto, Ernest Pagano (Wroter), Riccardo Pallottini (Cinematography), Chris Pang, Dorothy Parker (Writer), Charles Paton, Elizabeth Patterson, Wolfgang Petersen, Georges Perinal (Cinematography), Valerie Perrine, Frank V. Philips (Cinematography), Joaquin Phoenix, Irving Pichel, Jack P. Pierce (Writer), Ania Pieroni, Edward Platt, Oscar Polk, Bill Pope (Cinematography), Albert Popwell, Victor Potel, Dick Powell, Dinny Powell, Tilo Prücknker, Mario Puzzo (Writer), Anthony Quayle, Milo Quesdada, Eddie Quinlin, John Sayles (Writer), Stanley Shapiro (Writer), Giuliani Raffaelli, Umberto Raho, Jane Randolph, John Randolph, Jean Ransome, Nicholas Ray (Director/Writer), Paula Raymond, Robert Redford, Manning Redwood, Alan Reed, Christopher Reeve, George Reeves, Frano Ressel, Alma Reville (Writer), Marjorie Reynolds, Ryan Reynolds, Leoda Richards, Thomas Richards (Editor), Stanley Ridges, Shane Rimmer, Antonio Rinaldi (Cinematography), Elizabeth Risdon, Margot Robbie, Beatrice Roberts, Leona Roberts, Edward G. Robinson, Mark Robson (Writer), William Roerick, Clayton Rohner, Owen Roizman (Cinematography), Greg Roland (Cinematography), Lawernce Roman (Writer), Micheal Rooker, Mickey Rooney, Harry Rosenthal, Angelo Rossitto, Ellyn Rosyln, Mickey Rourke, Russell Rouse (Writer), Charles Ruggles, Wesley Ruggles (Director), John Rusell, Rosalind Russell, Morrie Ryskind (Writer), Howard St. John, Chris Sarandon, John Saxon, William Schaller, Maximilian Schell, Lalo Schifrin (Composer), Russel F. Schoengarth (Editor), Joseph Schrank (Writer), Jean Seberg, George Segal, William A. Seiter (Director), Lorenzo Semple Jr. (Writer), Mario Serendrei (Editor), Leo Shaken (Composer), Joan Shawlee, William Shea (Editor), Martin Sheen, Reginald Sheffield, Lawrence Sher (Cinematography), Ann Sheridan, Robert Sherwood, David Shire (Composer), Howard Shore (Composer), Tony Sibbald, Don Siegal (Actor/Director), Alan Silvestre (Composer), Jean Simmons, Carl Sklover, Tess Slesinger (Writer), Walter Slezak, Everett Sloane, Brooke Smith, Charles Martin Smith, Dan Snow, Drew Snyder, Vladimir Sokoloff, Suzanne Somers, Alberto Spagnoli (Cinematography), Ned Sparks, Dorothy Spencer (Editor), Douglas Spencer, Lionel Stander, Harry Dean Stanton, Sylvester Stallone, Helene Stanton, Benito Stefanelli, Rod Steiger, John Steinbeck (Writer), John Steiner, Naomi Stevens, Onslow Stevens, Nick Stewart, Paul Stewart, Ludwig Stössel, David Strathairn, Randy Stuart, Harry Stubbs, Grady Sutton, Seijun Suzuki (Director), Joseph Sweeney, Robert Swink, Ben Taggert, Isao Tamagawa, Russ Tamblyn, Daniel Taradish (Writer), Ron Tarr, Frank Tashlin (Director and Writer), Ada and Arlene Tau, Dub Taylor, Dwight Taylor, Libby Taylor, Samuel A. Taylor (Writer), Lewis Teague (Director), Lew Temple, Fabio Testi, Thorin Thatcher, Harvey F. Thew (Writer), J. Lee Thompson (Director), Sven-Ole Thorsen, Philip Tinge, George Tobias, Marisa Tomei, Franchot Tone, John Tourette, Emerson Treacy, Lana Turner (Includes Archival Footage), Brenda Vaccaro, Lee Van Cleef, Virgina Van Upp (Writer), Evelyn Varden, Conrad Veidt, John Vernon (Archival Footage Included), Martha Vickers, Yvette Vickers, Henry Victor, George Voskovec, Sidney Wagner (Cinematography), Raymond Walburn, Bill Walker, Helen Walker, Robert Walker, Tracey Walter, Anthony Warde, David Warner, Theron Warth (Editor), Gedde Watanabe, Ken Watanbe, Lucille Watson, Keenan Ivory Waynes (Actor, Writer, and/or Director), Clifton Webb, Ferris Webster (Editor), Paul Weigel, Tuesday Weld, David Weisberg (Editor), Orson Welles (Actor, Writer, Director), Howard Wendell, Mae West (Actor/Writer), James Westerfield, Bill Weston, Garnett Weston (Writer), Christine White, Jesse White, Merrill G. White (Editor), Forest Whitiker, James Whitmore, Dame May Whitty, Patrick Whyte, Henry Wilcoxon, Harry J. Wild (Cinematography), Hagar Wilde, Kathleen Wilhoite, Rhys Williams, Robert Williams, Laureen Willoughby, Clarence Wilson, Dooley Wilson, Marie Windsor, Robert Winkler, Shelley Winters, Isabel Withers, Googie Withers, Sam Wood (Director), Teresa Wright, Jane Wyman, Junkie XL (Composer), George Worthin Yates (Writer), Bolo Yeung, Philip Yordan (Writer), Clifton Young, Gig Young, Mary Young, Susannah York, Carl Zittrer (Composer)

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31 Days of Film in January 2020-Week 2

January 6th-Barefoot Contessa from 1954 (Director/Writer: Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Stars: Humphrey Bogart, Ava Gardner, and Edmond O’Brien, Cinematography: Jack Cardiff, Runtime: 130 mins)

After a rather rough first week I kick off the 6th day of January with a famous Humohrey Bogart and Ava Gardner picture. Amazing to think I have not watched* a Gardner pic at all last year. This film, told in flashbacks, is about Maria Vargas. She was a Spanish dancer who was persuaded to be in the film by washed up Harry Dawes and financed by a cold millionaire. It tracks her meeting with Dawes, millionaire Kirk, and his associate Oscar. Then we see bits and pieces of her as told from Dawes, Oscar and then a little from her eventual husband.

The film is sort of a mixed bag. I think it opens incredibly strong and then becomes less and less interesting as it goes. However the performances and style keep the film up as an entertaining drama. The first part of the film where Daws and the others arrive to meet Maria is incredibly strong. In fact, almost everything with Bogart and Edmond O’Brien (who plays Oscar) is some of the best on screen. O’Brien would win an Oscar for this performance. Gardner is very good to, as I did not even question her as a native Spaniard. Everyone else is good, just those three stood out.

I think one of the problems, and its something only occured really after seeing a Letterboxd review, there is not a lot of definition to Maria. I am sure I would have worked it out but the quick scan during the final moments of the film made me start thinking of it at that moment. Gardner is very good, very beautiful and graceful, but Maria’s personality is seen through the eyes of everyone else. The courtroom scene washes away her voice in a moment that by the stories definition is incredibly important to the character. It is a little saddening. Still, the hard part is that the final act feels a bit like a drag. Despite all that is a pretty beautiful film to look at. Definitely one of the better movies so far in 2020.

*A clip of Ava Gardner appears in Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid. I don’t know which film Steve Martin interacted with.

[Trailer]

BONUS: Family from 2018 (Director/Writer: Laura Steinel, Stars: Taylor Schilling, Brian Tyree Henry, Bryn Vale, Allison Tolman, Fabrizio Guido, Kate McKinnon and Peter Horton, Cinematography: Michael Simmonds, Runtime: 88 mins)

I listened to Insane Clown Posse in high school. While I was never a full blown juggalo, I do sometimes have the urge to listen to some ICP from time to time. I never understood the hate they recieved, thought the FBI was full of shit when they classified juggalos as a gang, and why I always find their portrayal in media fascinating. Laura Steinel took a popular film trope of workaholic woman disconnected to family and the one episode of Workaholic, tossed it together in a blender and delivered a film I am so happy to have seen.

Kate is a hard working woman pressured to take care of her niece while her brother and sister in law deal with the move of a family member in hospice. ,addie is an outsider. She skips ballet to hang at karate, has no friends in high school and is picked on, just a rough go of it. She meets a teenager who is into Insane Clown Posse while Kate is trying to take care of her. Kate is trying hard to connect with Maddie but also worried about her job. By the way, Kate is a total asshole to people at work. Eventually Maddie runs off to the Gathering of the Juggalos. A infamous festival.

Taylor Schilling is fantastic as Kate. I only seen her on Orange is the New Black (only 4 seasons) and there are times whe she was great on that show but a lot when she was rather frustrating as a character. Her she is such a glorious dick. Bryn Vale is fantastic as Maddie. So full of anger, anxiety and loneliness. Props to Brian Tyree Henry as the karate instructor who crushes every scene. Fantastic cast with Kate McKinnon and a great Natasha Lyonne cameo. This film had me smiling and at times really laughing. Especially any juggalo stuff. Everything surrounding ICP and its fans was well done including the rap groups brief scene.

Story wise its been there done that with a twist. But I don’t care. I loved it. Ate it up. Really enjoyed Kate and Maddies friendship. The film has a very simple aesthetic visually but with tight editing, some great comedic shots and staging looks really good. I had been meaning to watch this since I first saw the trailer in 2018, took me too damn long.

[Trailer]

January 7th-Experiment In Terror from 1962 (Director: Blake Edwards, Writers: The Gordons, Stars: Glenn Ford, Lee Remick, Stefanie Powers, and Ross Martin, Cinematography: Philip H. Lathrop, Runtime: 123 mins)

Not feeling like doing subtitles tonight I switched around the films and put this one in. A noir thriller from a director best known for comedy. There is nothing funny about this film about a bankteller threatened my a mystery man to rob her job. Kelly Sherwood returns home to be grabbed and threatened by a man who threatens her and her sister. She tries reaching the FBI but is caught and knocked down, threatened. Luckily FBI man Ripley and his team are able to surreptitiously work with Kelly to find this man who seems to know everything about her. They surveil Kelly and sister Toby, bug the phone, have an informant, chase down leads which eventually leads them a killer they can’t find. They interview the killers ex but she is reluctant to help because he has helped with her sons surgery.

This film has the classic noir look in those first few moment between Lee Remick and Ross Martin. wonderfully obscuring his fave as he holds threatens Lee. Lee is fantastic through as she goes along with the caper but also helping the police. The scene where she lets loose on the baddie during a mix up for their meeting was great. Stefanie Powers plays the sister which for a chunk is a part with no meat but when the baddie tricks her into meeting him she delivers in an uncomfortable and dark scene. Then props to Anita Loo. Fucking sucks that Hollywood racism probably prevented this woman much opportunities. She is wonderful, and has a very tricky part. It is a stand out. All through we got Glenn Ford playing the hard nosed investigator with a lot of… Idealism? He never wavers and is dedicated to getting the bad guy. There is no arc for him but doesn’t need to be. Ross Martin is a son of a bitch as the bad guy Red Lynch.

This is a wonderful looking film. A noir on a bigger budget then some noirs get. The last act takes place at a Giants game and we get some beautiful shots throughout that sequence. There are a number of beautiful shots everywhere. It is a very pretty picture. Its a tense film for most of it, though I think it does drag a little in the middle leading into the third act but then it gets right back on board be a thrilling picture. Definitely one of the best films I have seen thus far in 2020.

[Trailer]

January 8th-Face Of Another from 1966 (Director: Hiroshi Teshigahara, Writers: Kōbō Abe and based on his novel, Stars: Tatsuya Nakadai, Machiko Kyō and Kyōko Kishida, Cinematography: Hiroshi Segawa, Runtime: 121 mins)

Face of Another is part of the Japanese new wave film movement. A doctor who has his face scarred waxes philosophically while another doctor works to make a special like life mask. The story has a lot going in, actors doing big grand poetic dialogue, and it moves pretty slow. The thing I most appreciated was the visuals. Yes the performances are all good but visually this is a pretty stunning film. From the photography, to the editing and transitions, to just things like the doctors lab. Or how scenes at a bar are lit and staged. Its an industrial nightmare visually. I don’t like this film as much as it is valued but I greatly appreciated every aspect of it.

[Trailer]

January 9th-Harper from 1966 (Director: Jack Smight, Writers: William Goldman and Based on and The Moving Target by Ross Macdonald, Stars: Paul Newman, Lauren Bacall, Julie Harris, Arthur Hill and Janet Leigh, Cinematography: Johnny Mandel, Runtime: 121 mins)

Needed more Lauren Bacall.

Perfectly fine film but I was mentally checked out for some reason. Burn out coming early?

[Trailer]

DOUBLE FEATURE: January 10th-Death Laid An Egg from 1968 (Director: Giulio Questi, Writers: Guilio Questi and Franco Arcalli, Stars: Ewa Aulin, Gina Lollobrigida and Jean-Louis Trintignant, Cinematography: Dario Di Palma, Runtime: 90 mins)

The Case of the Bloody Iris from 1972 (Director: Giuliano Carnimeo, Writers: Ernesto Gastaldi, Stars: Edwige Fenech and George Hilton, Cinematography: Stelvio Massi, Runtime: 94 mins)

Death Laid an Egg is hard to really describe. Especially as the cut I watched was probably the American edit. The film deals with an exec at a poultry company named Marco. Him and his wife Anna run a new poultry lab. They live with their assistant Gabrielle. So… there is a new feed machine. Marco hires hookers and kills them. Gabrielle and an ad man are playing a game to rid of Marco and Anna because Gabrielle will get their house and money.

This strange giallo leans more into the psychological thriller style with a bizarre set of images, editing and one hell of a score. The high tech poultry lab/farm, shots to the country side and… Well someone online called it a kaleidoscope of images and I guess thats right. One reason I like giallos is the style and this one has style. There are some fantastic imagery coupled with the industrial look of the farm and the style of Anna and Gabrielle. Also, back to that score-what? Very harsh sounds in parts and when it goes softer it still like a dream on the verge of turning into a nightmare.

The story does little for me and I find Jean-Louis Trintignant rather dull as the lead. However the twist that he was not killing the sex workers but rather playing a game was neat. I thought both female leads were fantastic. I also do believe that maybe the full cut which is about 20 minutes longer probably would be a better film. It felt like I was missing something in several scenes. Still, I enjoyed it.

The Case of the Bloody Iris is a famous 70s giallo about models being killed by a gloved killer. A popular theme that runs through. This whodunnit centers around Edwige Fenech as Jennifer. The films originalmtitle, translated from Italian, is Why Those Strange Drops of Blood on Jennifer’s Body? which I actually prefer. Police are on the case of the murders and how they are connected to an apartment complex. There is Edwiges ex husband who is the obvious red hering. Some twists and here and there until it all makes sense. Sort of.

I think this ones popularity is entirely due to Fenech. The beautiful actress was a icon of the giallo subgenre but this pales in comparison to the films I watched with her in Ocotber. She’s good, the cast is fine, the set up is okay. It just does not do anything special. It plays rather straight forward and if it was not for the reveal I think it would totally fail. Visually a very generic looking thriller. Lacks the gothic touches of Sergo Martino, or the haunting atmosphere of Mario Bava’s best, and not the vibrance of Dario Argento. It is rather just okay.

[Death Laid an Egg Trailer / The Case of the Bloody Iris Trailer]

January 11th-Underwater from 2020 (Director: William Eubank, Writers: Brian Duffield and Adam Cozad, Stars: Kristen Stewart, Vincent Cassel, Jessica Henwick, John Gallagher Jr., Mamoudou Athie, and T.J. Miller, Cinematography: Bojan Bazelli, Runtime: 95 mins)

A bunch of people who were foolish to work on an underwater rig, drilling into the earth, find themselves in a bad situation. How bad? They need to get 7 miles to other part of the rig to get to the escape pods. The path that way means going deeper under water, and walking on the floor. Fuck that.

This film fires off quick. No time wasted. The rig gets busted up as Kristen Stewart and company have to get from point A to B. Its a disaster flick and a horror flick. Stewart is a mechanic, I guess. Doesn’t matter. What matters is the thrill ride and throughout I said ‘nah.’ From crawling through tight spaces. Those underwater suits dealing with all the pressure. The walking on the water and seeing those monsters. Its obstacle after obstacle and it all sucks for the characters. Great for the viewer though.

I really enjoyed this flick. I liked it started hard and kept going. I think Stewart and Jessica Henwick are very good. There were some bits I did get annoyed by. Confused by who was who when we saw the characters in those outfits. The usual horror shenanigans where the characters do somethingnatupid. Still, I was having fun and then mother fucking Cthulu shows up. Okay, maybe it wasn’t the legend itself but it was awesome. I loved how it looked. The nihilistic ending was perfect with Stewarts defiant look at the end. This is going to grow in reputation.

[Trailer]

1950s NOIR DOUBLE FEATURE:January 12th-Shadow on the Wall from 1950 (Director: Pat Jackson, Writers: William Ludwig and Based on the story “Death in the Doll’s House” by Lawrence P. Bachmann And Hannah Lees, Stars: Ann Sothern, Zachary Scott, Gigi Perreau and Nancy Davis, Cinematography: Ray June, Runtime: 84 mins)

Mystery Street from 1950 (Director: John Sturges, Writers: Sydney Boehm and Richard Brooks with Story by Leonard Spigelgass, Stars: Ricardo Montalban, Sally Forrest, Bruce Bennett, Elsa Lanchester, and Marshall Thompson, Cinematography: John Alton, Runtime: 93 mins)-crime/comedy

First up the story of a young child who may have witnessed the murder of her stepmom. Her father has been sent away to jail, thinking he accidentally shot his cheating wife after she struck him with a hand mirror. He was unconcious when the police came. A doctor played by future villain Nancy Regean is determined to help the girl but the real killer watches with concern. Mystery Street opens with a bar girl named Vivian looking to contact a mystery man who wants nothing to do with her. She picks up a guy with a car, then eventually ditches him to see the man but is murder. Fast forward to when a detective played by Ricardo Montleban gets assigned to work the case with Boston PD. Teaming with a Harvard doctor who assists the police in forensics. As the police follow the clues through the case the murderer is trying to keep their head down and Vivians landlady looking to do some blackmail.

Shadow on the Wall is a good flick. Noir and psychological thriller. Though not quite hitting the highs I think it could’ve. Zachary Scott and Gigi Perreau as father and daughter are very good. I guess future first lady Nancy Davis is good too. Though some of her methods at trying to help Gigi is questionable. Force the traumatized daughter to recount what she saw. I guess executions did happen quicker in the past. I have mixed feelings on Ann Southern, partially thinking this is a Gloria Grahame role. I think she is okay.

I like the first act the best, the build to murder. Then it sort of gets just okay with its pacing but performances for the most part keep it entertaining. There are some very nice visuals every once in a while, like Anns character imagining the electric chair before she gets her hair done in one of those machines. The big visual cue the films name comes from. I wish there was more. Still, pretty good film with some great ideas.

Mystery Street is classified as a film noir but slightly closer to a police procedural. Its interesting to watch a detective do most everything right and still be frustrated that his most obvious suspect could be innocent and now must keep pushing. We know Montelban did the work, are mad when we know he has the wrong guy, and want him to try harder. He does. Obviously the original suspect is cagey when first approached, then Elsa Lanchester is trying to screw things up so she can blackmail the real killer. Elsa is so hateable in this film. Montelban is pretty likeable though he can be frustrating at times. Sally Forrest who plays the wife of the accused nails her small part so well.

This is an MGM made crime film, and they were not well known for noirs and crime movies. This is supposedly a low budget affair but feels higher budget because of the investigation detail. Even the way the first act, or prologue I guess, leading to Vivians death looks. Visually it has the hallmarks of a noir. I love the scene where the detective and doctor are comparing the skull of the victim with the pictures of missing women, trying to determine who was killed. Its a good looking film. Thoroughly enjoyed it.

[Shadow on the Wall Trailer / Mystery Street Trailer]

BONUS FILM: The Gold Rush from 1925 (Director/Writer/Stars: Charlie Chaplin, Cinematography: Roland Totheroh, Runtime: 95 mins)

I don’t know shit about silent films. I rarely watch them and when I am finished I don’t know if I should have liked it more or less than I did. So I have been dreading getting to Chaplain. Never got around to City Lights when Unspooled cover it and now this one has come for Thursdays episode. So here we are.

Gold Rush has Chaplains Tramp going up to brutal Alaska. He stays at a cabin during a storm with a convict (Tramp is unaware) and a large prospector. Then after he tries to woe a pretty woman, stuff stuff and stuff. Then him and the big prospector go looking for that cabin which is near a mountain of gold. That’s about it I think.

The first act is my favorite with great visual cues and amazing effects work. From a bear following Chaplain, to the wind gags, and the mountain breaking apart it is filled with fantastic moments. Then it keeps going. Tramp shows up in town, dance segment with a woman named Georgia, and some other stuff. There is the scene where he images a party he was expecting to throw. He does that dance using forks and rolls. Its an iconic film moment and its fine. The return to the cabin provides another moment of fascinating effects.

Look, I am not this films audience but its fine. Its probably, rightfully a classic. I just have a hard time with silents.

[Trailer]

Thoughts On The Week: Better than last week with some real gems. Though I might have went too high on Family but it was such a breath of fresh air in the midst of everything I was watching. Sometimes formula films work.

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31 Days of Film in January 2020-Week 1

Aw shit, here we go again.

January 1st-Blackboard Jungle from Year (Director/Writer: Richard Brooks and based on the book by Evan Hunter, Stars: Glenn Ford, Sidney Poitier, Vic Morrow, Anne Francis and Louis Calhern, Cinematography: Russell Harlan, Runtime: 101 mins)

Class of 1984 from Year (Director: Mark L. Lester, Writers:
Tom Holland, Mark Lester, John Saxton with Story by Holland, Stars: Perry King, Merrie Lynn Ross, Timothy Van Patten, Lisa Langlois, Roddy McDowell, Stefan Arngrim, Michael J. Fox, Cinematography: Albert J. Dunk, Runtime: 94 mins)

Blackboard Jungle is the story of a new teacher named Mr. Dadier who is working for an all boys high school filled with problem students. One specific student named Artie is screwing with Dadier and other teachers. Artie runs with a gang who follow him. Another student, Miller, is a black student Dadier hopes to sway to help him win over the class. A 1955 controversial classic about juvenile delinquency which leads 1982 cult classic Class of 1984. New teacher, problem school, problem students, and gang violence. Difference is this is mean spirited trash with no substitute for Miller, a bad guy far worse than Artie, with drug selling and violence against women. Roger Ebert really liked this film.

Blackboard Jungle is one of those over the top dramatic films. Glenn Ford going hard in every scene. Sidney Poitier effortlessly making his scenes his own. Louis Calhern, Vic Morrow and others delivering strong performances. The performances definitely overshadow the problems with the script. The kids are obviously playing versions of delinquents. Dialed up to 10. The bar across the street from the school, the teacher bring his rare records to a problem school, the fact the one teacher did not quit right after being attacked-its hard to believe. It definitely spends time milking Dadiers conflict about abandoning the school versus trying to reach out. The film has a good premise but has various issues in the details.

The acting was just one of the better things about Blackboard Jungle. The other being the direction. Its a very good looking film. The couple action scenes are well staged, the atmosphere of the school is perfectly depressing, and photography is well done. This is a very good looking film with very good music. To think this helped popularize the classic Rock Around the Clock. It doesn’t really fit but it still seems cool that its in there. Blackboard Jungle isn’t without its faults and is terribly dated but a fascinating film with a lot of good points.

Blackboard Jungles lofty aspirations is why Class of 1984 is a slightly better movie. By being a clear cut thriller and not aiming to be high art director Mark Lester, co-writer a(and horror director) Tom Holland put together a piece of work. Class of 1984 is built on a template and then just goes crazy with it. Gang leader Stegman is nasty, awful, and unsympathetic as is his gang. Timothy Van Patten portrays one of the most assholish bad guys ever put to screen. Perry King plays the teacher and unlike Dadier he isn’t dealing with a 100% awful class so its easier to buy him wanting to stay. Plus he is against Stegman right off the bat, wanting to remove him from the troubled school.

The film, after taking its cues from other similar movies, switches to the thriller aspect rather early. We get a gang fight like 15 minutes in. Stegmans dislike rising as teacher starts to build as they go back and forth. From Mr. Norris interrupting a drug deal, the students attacking a fellow student, setting up Norris attacking him and Norris destroying Stegmans car. Lots going on. Then there is Roddy McDowell playing a teacher trying to keep his head down but ultimately snaps. A wonderful scene holding the class hostage. Michal J. Fox as one of the good students and gets only a few scenes but is very good in them.

The build up is to a violent confrontation. Teacher fights back and kills (a couple of them). They brutal assault his wife and lead him into a gauntlet, he goes hard. All this going on while his ,usic class is performing. Honestly, as I watched Blackboard Jungle I expected something similar. A little disappointed Dadaier and Artie did not have a rooftop fight to a class concert. Class of 1984 is proof a trashy derivative film can be equal to or greater than the film that set the precedent before it.

Way to kick of 2020. Fuck Stegman.

[Blackboard Jungle Trailer / Class of 1984 Trailer]

January 2nd-The 13th Chair from 1929 (Director: Tod Browning, Writers: Elliott J. Clawson, Joseph Farnham and based on the play by Bayard Veiller, Stars: Conrad Nagel, Leila Hyams and Margaret Wycherly with Bela Lugosi, Cinematography: Harry Reynolds, Runtime: 73 mins)

Day 2 of 2020, and now starting the 13th month of watching films everyday. This 1929 film is an early sound film based in a play by a director Tod Browning who made movies that felt like a drag. Despite the fact he did Dracula and Freaks, which are both classics. This was not a good movie but because it was an early talkie I will cut it some slack. But not much.

Bela Lugosi was cool though.

[No Clip]

DOUBLE FEATURE: January 3rd-My Dream Is Yours from 1949 (Director: Michael Curtiz with Friz Freleng, Writers: Lots, Stars: Jack Carson, Doris Day, and Lee Bowman, Cinematography: Wilfred M. Cline and Ernest Haller, Runtime: 101 mins)

Lets Make Love from 1960 (Director: George Cukor, Writers: Norman Krasna, Hal Kanter, and Arthur Miller, Stars: Marilyn Monroe, Yves Montand, and Tony Randall, Cinematography: Daniel L. Fapp, Runtime: 119 mins)

Two romantic comedies that are kinda musicals. Both star blondes. Both run longer than necessary taking a good set up and grinding it past the point where it needs a new direction to maintain freshness. Why? I guess an old film with a known star just counts as a classic film even when it really is not.

First was My Dream Is Yours where a agent is upset with his former client pretty ,uch kicking him to the side. Goes to find a new talent, enter single mother played by Doris Day. Then spends a long stretch trying to get her noticed by the only guy he thinks matters. Doris finds success and love. Then in Lets Make Love we have Yves Montand going to a play rehearsal looking to confront a portrayal of him only to get confused for an actor. He then falls of Marilyn Monroe. Then as he pretends to be an actor and then tries to tell the truth. minor obstacles whatever, this film, was really 40 minutes too long.

Michael Curtiz and George Cukor directed these films. Two legends. Neither film come close to being standouts. Not to say they are bad. From a technical standpoint they look good. The actors are trying their damndest. I think Doris Day and Eve Arden are very good in My Dream is Yours. The Looney Tunes cameo musical piece is a weird but neat bit. I think Yves and Marilyn are good in their film. But neither film works for me. They are dated and are slow and squander a lot of potential to play to typical happy Hollywood romantic tropes.

I have been putting off watching giallos and horror flicks and cult trash to get through these DVR films. But now I kind feel I should jump in earlier than planned. I mean, the bad ones might be gloriously bad.

[My Dream Is Yours Trailer / Let’s Make Love Trailer]

January 4th-Murder Most Foul from 1964 (Director: George Pollock, Writers: David Pursall, Jack Seddon and Based on Mrs. McGinty’s Dead by Agatha Christie, Stars: Margaret Rutherford as Miss Jane Marple, Charles Tingwell, and Stringer Davis, Cinematography: Desmond Dickinson, Runtime: 90 mins)

I don’t have much to say about this film.

[Trailer]

January 5th-Harlan County USA from 1976 (Director: Barbara Kopple, Cinematography: Kevin Keating, Hart Perry and Tom Hurwitz, Runtime: 103 mins)

Academy Award winning documentary on the strike against a coal company. very interesting, fascinating structure, and a number of imteresting moments through out. Was not riveted like I had hoped but still a good flick and very important look into how capitalism can hurt and kill people.

[Trailer]

Thoughts For The Week: Not the slam bang week to start the year. Last year I had a better line up of films. While some of what I watch was big in its day, it was not for me. Of course last year I had a bunch of the all time greats in the first few weeks and had not been spoiled with weeks upon weeks of films. This is week 53.

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31 Days of Film in December-Links, Rankings, & Stats

527 movies total. Thats not counting the annual Christmas Rewatches and anything I just put in as background noise. Truthfully December was a lackluster month it seemed but I did it. And I ain’t stopping yet.

Top 10 for December
1. Dolemite Is My Name
2. 12 Angry Men*
3. Miracle on 34th Street
4. Christmas Evil
5. Pickup On South Street
6. To Die For
7. Tammy and the T-Rex
8. Anna and the Apocalypse
9. Bombshell (2019)
10. An Affair to Remember

Worst Film For November
Santa Claus Conquers the Martians

Films Watched This Month
46 Total
42 New
4 Rewatch

Average Star Rating Based On My Letterboxd Ratings: 3.06 out of 5

December Weekly Reviews
Week 1, Week 2, Week 3, Rest of Month

Letterboxd|Twitter|Instagram

Previous Months Links, Rankings & Stats
January, February, March, April, June, July, August, September, October, November

By The Numbers
This Is An Incomplete List
All Names Are Actors Unless Otherwise Noted
Includes Archival Footage-Clips of a film with an actor were used in another film. For example, James Cagney movie plays in Fade to Black and are used as story elements in Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid.

Twenty-Four Films: Edith Head (Costume/Wardrobe), Cedric Ribbons (Production Design)

Twenty-Three Films: Bess Flowers (Queen of Extras),

Twenty Films: Alfred Hitchcock (Master of Suspense),

Nineteen Films: Cary Grant (Includes Archival Footage),

Seventeen Films: Jean Harlow, Lyle R. Wheeler (Production Design),

Sixteen Films: Franz Waxman (Composer),

Fifteen Films: Adrian (Costume/Wardrobe), Humphrey Bogart (Includes Archival Footage),

Fourteen Films: Mel Berns (Make-Up), Wally Westmore (Make-Up),

Thirteen Films: Ben Hecht (Writer), Perc Westmore (Make-Up),

Twelve: Cyril J. Mockride (Composer),

Eleven Films: Joan Crawford (Includes Archival Footage), James Stewart,

Ten Films: Irene (Costume/Wardrobe), John Carradine, Roger Corman (Director/Actor), Clark Gable, Howard Hawks (Director), Eugene Joseff (Costume/Wardrobe), Boris Karloff, Bela Lugosi, Jack P. Pierce (Make-Up), Max Steiner (Composer),

Nine Films: Orry-Kelly (Costume/Wardrobe), Mario Bava (Director/Writer/Cinematography), Ward Bond, Henry Fonda, Carole Lombard, Dick Miller, Bert Moorhouse, Alfred Newman (Composer), Ben Nye (Make-Up), Hal Pereira (Production Design), Vincent Price (Includes Archival Footage),

Eight Films: Gino Corrado, Jules Furthman (Writer), Stephen King (Novelist), Charles Lang (Cinematographer), Fritz Lang (Director/Writer), Michael Mark, Marilyn Monroe, Van Nest Polglase (Production Design), Harold Rosson (Cinematographer), Miklos Rozsa (Composer), Arthur Tovey, Vera West (Costume/Wardrobe), Billy Wilder (Director/Writer),

Seven Films: Lionell Atwill, Lucien Ballard (Cinematographer), Ralph Bellamy, James Cagney (Including Archival Footage), Leo G. Carroll, Jack Carson, Carroll Clark (Production Design), Bette Davis (Includes Archival Footage), Arthur Edeson (Cinematography), Hugo Friedhofer (Composer), Porter Hall, Colin Kenny, Ted J. Kent (Editor), John Leipold (Composer), Peter Lorre, Daniel Mandell (Editor), Frank McLure, Ray Milland (Includes Archival Footage), John Qualan, Dorothy Spencer (Editor), Bert Stevens, Travilla (Costumes), Jean Claude Van Damme, Roy Webb (Composer),

Six Films: Edward Arnold (Includes Archival Footage), Mary Astor, Lauren Bacall, Martin Balsam, William Bendix, Wade Boteler, Walter Brennan, Robert Burks (Cinematography), Louis Calhern, Lon Chaney Jr., Spencer Charters, Charles Coburn, Elisha Cook Jr, George Cukor (Director), Jack Dawn (Make-Up), William Demarest, Pat Flaherty, Leland Fuller (Production Design), Edward Gargan, Lee Garmes (Cinematography), Charles D. Hall (Production Design), Charles Halton, Theresa Harris, Audrey Hepburn, Edward Everett Horton, James Wong Howe (Cinematography), John Huston (Director/Writer), George Kennedy, Milton Krasner (Cinematography), Charles Lane, Doris Lloyd, Jean Louis (Costume/Wardrobe), Ernst Lubitsch (Director), Joseph MacDonald (Cinematography), Rudolph Maté (Cinematography/Director), Hattie McDaniel, Una Merkal, Franklin Pangborn, Gregory Peck, Edgar Allan Poe (Writer/Inspiration), Heinz Roemheld (Composer), Ginger Rogers, Barbara Steele, Harry Stradling Sr. (Cinematography), Frank Sullivan (Editor), Ted Tetzlaff (Cinematography), Gene Tierney, Spencer Tracy, Norma Varden, Joseph Walker (Cinematography),

Five Films: Wesley Addy, Dana Andrews, Gertrude Astor, Colleen Atwood (Costume/Wardrobe), William Axt (Composer), Irving Bacon, Frank Baker, William Benedict, Charles Bennett (Writer), Marlon Brando, George Chandler, Jimmy Conlin, Jack Conway (Director), Harry Cording, Jeff Corey, Marcel Dailo, IAL Diamond (Writer), Ann Doran, Mary Field, George J. Folsey (Cinematography), Stuart Freeborn (Make-Up), Dwight Frye, Steven Geray, Charley Grapwin, Ernest Haller (Cinematography), Leigh Harline (Composer), Harry Hayden, Rita Hayworth, Katherine Hepburn, Holmes Herbert, Bernard Herrmann (Composer), James Wong Howe (Cinematography), Samuel L. Jackson, Isabel Jewell, Henry Jones (Archival Footage Included), Ray June (Cinematography), Roscoe Karns, Alan Ladd (Includes Archival Footage), Veronica Lake (Includes Archival Footage), Charles Laughton (Actor/Director/Includes Archival Footage), Charles Lederer (Writer), John Litel, Arthur Loft, Myrna Loy, Anita Loos (Writer), Barton MacLane, John Lee Mahin (Writer), Edwin Maxwell, Matt McHugh, Torben Meyer, Thomas Mitchell, Robert Mitchum, Barboura Morris, Alan Mowbray, Nicholas Musuraca (Cinematography), Robert Emmett O’Connor, Una O’Connor, Moroni Olsen, Garry Owen, Eugene Pallette, Nat Pendleton, Walter Plunkett (Costumes), Sol Polito (Cinematography), William Powell, Claude Rains, Thelma Ritter, George Robinson (Cinematography), Sig Ruman, Jeff Sayre, Arthur P. Schmidt (Editor), John F. Seitz (Editor), Blanche Sewell (Editor), Leon Shamroy (Cinematography), Sylvia Sidney, Jo Swerling (Writer), Dimitri Tiomkin (Composer), George Tomasini (Editor), Fred ‘Snowflake’ Toones, Jacques Tourneur (Director), Geoffrey Unsworth (Cinematography), Ellinor Vanderveer, Robert Warwick, James Whale (Director), Richard Widmark, John Williams (The Actor Not The Composer), Chill Wills, Robert Wise (Director/Editor/Sound Design), Victor Young (Composer),

Four Films: Frank Albertson, Murray Alper, Morris Ankrum, Dario Argento (Director/Writer), Stuart Baird (Editor), George Bassman (Composer), George Barnes (Cinematograhy), John Barry (Composer), Don Beddoe, Gordon Bau (Make-Up), Les Baxter (Composer), Ned Beatty, Louis Beavers, Brooks Benedict, Marjorie Bennett, Ingrid Bergman, Charles Bernstein (Composer), Billy Bevan, Kent Beyda (Editor), Clara Blandick, Joan Blondell, Eric Blore, Rudy Bond, Beaulah Bondi, Egon Brecher, Charles Bronson, W.R. Burnett (Writer), Frank Capra (Director), James B. Clark (Editor), EE Clive, Claudette Colbert, Joyce Compton, Gary Cooper, Alec Craig, Laird Cregar, Floyd Crosby (Cinematography), Jack Curtis, Jane Darwell, Ted De Corsia, Hubert De Givenchy (Costumes), Richard Deacon, Adolph Deutsch (Composer), Robert Di Niro, Marlene Dietrich, Jean Dixon, Ruth Donnelly, Jay Dratler (Writer), Dan Duryea, Frank Ferguson, Victor Fleming (Director), John Ford (Director), Wallace Ford, Lance Fuller, Jeff Goldblum, Mary Gordon, Lawrence Grant, Robert Grieg, Charles B. Griffith (Writer), Moses Gunn, Sam Harris, Joan Harrison (Writer), Forrester Harvey, Paul Harvey, Gene Havlick (Editor), William Holden, John Hoyt, Paul Hurst, Olaf Hytten, Carolyn Jones, Fred J. Koenekamp (Cinematography), Norman Krasna (Writer), Stanley Kubrick (Director/Writer/Producer), Elsa Lanchester, Joseph LaShelle (Cinematography), Ernest Laszlo (Cinematography), Anna Lee, Christopher Lee (with Archive footage), Ernest Lehman (Writer), William Levanway (Editor), Gene Lockhart, Otho Lovering (Editor), Dolph Lundgren, Ida Lupino, Fred MacMurray (Includes Archival Footage), Owen Marks (Editor), Hugh Marlowe, Mae Marsh, Strother Martin, Raymond Massey, Joel McCrea, Roddy McDowall, Russell Metty (Cinematographer), Vicente Minnelli (Director), Dickie Moore, Frank Morgan, Ennio Morricone (Composer), Lionel Newman (Composer), Daria Nicolodi, Edmond O’Brien, Robert Emmett O’Connor, Ann O’Neal, Reginald Owen, Jack Palance, Inez Palange, Lee Patrick, Dorothy Peterson, Tyrone Power, Andre Previn (Composer), Merrill Pye (Production Design), George Raft, Ivan Rassimov, Gene Raymond, Joseph Ruttenberg (Cinematography), Walter Sande, George Sanders, Erskine Sanford, Mario Serandrei (Editor), Harry Shannon, Ann Sheridan, Curt Siodmark (Writer), Frank Skinner (Composer), Howard St. John, Larry Steers, Donald Ogden Stewart (Writer), Lewis Stone, Woody Strode, Preston Sturges (Director/Writer), Ubaldo Terzano (Cinematography), Gregg Toland (Cinematography), Franchot Tone, Robert Townsend, Edgar G. Ulmer (Director/Production Design/Costumes), Joseph A. Valentine (Cinematography), H.B. Warner, John Wayne, Paul Weatherwax (Editor), Richard Webb, Ferris Webster (Editor), Bud Westmore (Make-Up), Larry Wheat, Ernest Whitman, Florence Wix, Will Wright, William Wyler, Kennan Wynn, Nedrick Young,

Three Films: Dorothy Adams, Robert Aldrich (Director), Henri Alekan, Kirk Alyn, Eddie ‘Rochester’ Anderson, Richard Anderson, Fred Astaire, George Axelrod (Writer), Fay Bainter, Lucille Ball, George Bancroft, Bobby Barber, George Barbier, Don Barclay, Harry Barris, Billy Barty, Louise Beavers, Lionel Belmore, Gregg Berger, Elmer Bernstein (Composer), Ted Billings, Whit Bissell, Oliver Blake, Monte Blue, Sammy Blum, Willis Bouchey, Charles Brackett, Neville Brand, Edward Bredell (Cinematography), Felix Bressart, Al Bridge, Clarence Brown, Barbara Brown, Robert Brown, Sidney Buchman (Writer), Frederick Burton, Spring Byington, Frank Cady, James M. Cain (Writer), Leonard Carey, Milton Carruth (Editor), Walter Catlett, Nora Cecil, Raymond Chandler (Novelist/Screenwriter), Don Cheadle, Candy Clark, Matt Clark, Wallis Clark, Mae Clarke, Dora Clement, Ruth Clifford, Chester Clute, Tony Curtis, David Clyde, Emmett Cogan, Ray Collins, Chester Conklin, Sean Connery, Frank Conroy, Albert Conti, Ellen Corby, Maurice Costello, Joseph Cotton, George Coulouris, Hazel Court, Brian Cox, Jack E. Cox (Cinematohraphy), John Cromwell (Director), Hume Cronyn, Jamie Lee Curtis, Michael Curtiz (Director), Henry Daniell, Harry Davenport, Delmer Daves (Writer), Geena Davis, Anthony Dawson, Doris Day, William H. Daniels (Cinematography), Olivia De Havilland, Gustavo De Nardo, Frank De Vol (Composer), Rob Delaney, William Demarest, Richard Denning, Harry Depp, Bruce Dern, Eddie Dew, Jean Dixon, Richard Donner (Director), Kirk Douglas (Includes Archival Footage), Melvyn Douglas, Elspeth Dudgeon, George Duning (Composer), Julius and Philip Epstein (Writer), Leif Erickson, Edith Evanson, Tom Ewell, Antonio Fargas, Don Fellows, Giancarlo Ferrando (Conematography), Charles Fleischer, Ian Fleming (Novelist), Rhonda Fleming, John Fiedler, Glenn Ford, Hugh S. Fowler (Editor), Franco Fraticelli (Editor), Paul Frees, Beverly Garland, Judy Garland, Oliver H.P. Garrett (Writer), Spencer Garrett, Ernesto Gastaldi (Writer), John George, Stuart Gilmore (Editor), James Gleason, John Glover, Gloria Grahme, Charles Gross Jr. (Editor), Clu Gulager, Edmund Gwenn, Sara Haden, Jean Hagen, Jonathon Hale, Murray Hamilton, Mark Hanna (Writer), Russell Harlan (Cinematography), Hugo Hass (Director/Writer/Actor), Sterling Hayden, John Michael Hayes (Writer), Patrica Hayes, Jonathan Haze, John Heldabrand, Fay Helm, Darryl Hickman, Howard C. Hickman, Sidney Hickox (Cinematography), Jack Hill (Director), Leyand Hodgson, Edmund Holding (Writer and Director), Friedrich Hollaender (Composer), Tim Holt, Miriam Hopkins, John Houseman, Olin Howland, Brandon Hurst, Walter Huston, Warren Hymer, Howard Jackson (Composer), Maurice Jarre (Composer), Allen Jenkins, Scarlett Johansson, Nunnally Johnson (Writer), Russell Johnson, Victor Julian, Bert Glennon (Cinematography), Mary Gordon, Roy Gordon, Garson Kanin, Elia Kazan (Director), Brian Keith, Barry Kelley, Mike Kellin, Grace Kelly, Tom Kennedy, June Kenney, Erle C. Kenton (Director), Hal C. Kern (Editor), Donald Kerr, Guy Kibbee, Margot Kidder, Nicole Kidman, Aron Kincaid, Henry Kolker, Alma Kruger, Philip H. Lathrop (Cinematography), Marc Lawrence, Richard Lawson, Jack Lemmon, Louis Levy (Composer), Joseph H. Lewis (Director), John Lithgow, Louis R. Loeffler (Editor), Lionel London (Cinematography), Herbert Lom, Ray Lovejoy (Editor), Michael Luciano (Editor), Sidney Lumet (Director), George Lynn, Donald MacBride, John McGiver, Matty Malneck (Composer), Marjorie Main, Joseph L. Mankiewicz (Writer), Hank Mann, Herbert Marshall, Archie Marshek (Editor), Grouco Marx, Lois Maxwell, Mike Mazurki, Leo McCarthy (Director/Writer), Butterfly McQueen, Edward McWade, Harriet Medin, Beryl Mercer, John J. Mescall (Cinematography), John Miljin, Hayley Mills, Victor Milner (Cinematography), Grant Mitchell, Jack Montgomery, Cleo Moore, Andre Morell, Adrian Morris, Charles R. Moore, Clarence Muse, J. Carroll Nash, Noel Neil, William Newell, Alfred Newman (Composer), Bruno Nicolai (Composer), Roberto Nicolosi (Composer), Marni Nixon, Alex North (Composer), Edgar Norton, Pat O’Brien, Maureen O’Hara, Frank Orth, Maria Ouspenskaya, Rick Overton, Anthony Perkins, Otto Perminger (Director), Nehemiah Persoff, Luciano Pigozzi, Franz Planer (Cinematography), Donald Pleasence, Christopher Plummer, John Posey, William Prince, Denver Pyle, Tony Randall, Samson Raphaelson (Writer), Gregory Ratoff, John Ratzenberger, Leoda Richards, John Ridgely, Massimo Righi, Roy Roberts, William Roberts (Writer), Hugh A. Robertson (Editor), May Robson, Howard Emmett Rogers (Writer), Donald R. Rondell, Hayden Rorke, Richard Roundtree, Deep Roy, Mark Ruffalo, Kurt Russell, Carlo Rustichelli, Tim Ryan, Waldo Salt (Writer), Hans J. Salter (Composer), Telly Savalas, Joe Sawyer, Sauro Scavolini (Writer), Palo Schifrin (Composer), Gus Schilling, Lizabeth Scott, Ralph Von Seyffertitz, Dan Seymour, Anita Sharp-Bolster, Jack Sholder (Director/Editor), Leo Shunken (Composer), Henry Silva, Jay Silverheels, Robert L. Simpson, Russell Simpson, Frank Sinatra, C. Aubrey Smith, Terrance Stamp, Wyndham Standing, Barbara Stanwyck (Includes Archival Footage), Ronald Stein (Composer), Henry Stephenson, Josef Von Sternberg (Director), George Stevens (Director), Patrick Stewart, George E. Stone, Harold J. Stone, Herbert Stothart (Composer), Glenn Strange, Donald Sutherland, Julius Tannen, Holland Taylor, Philip Tonge, Regis Toomey, Leo Tover (Cinematography), Arthur Tovey, William Tracy, Henry Travers, Claire Trevor, Dalton Trumbo (Writer), Burnell Tucker, Brian Tyler (Composer), Tom Tyler, Alida Valli, John Vernon (includes Archival Footage), Bruno VeSota (Actor/Writer), Christopher Walken, Walter Walker, Eli Wallach, Raoul Walsh (Director), Edward Ward (Composer), Rachel Ward, David Wayne, Damon Waynes, Mel Welles, Pat West, O.Z. Whitehead, Cornel Wilde, John Williams (Composer), Ian Wolfe, John Wray, Christopher Young (Composer), Robert Young, William H. Zeigler,

Two Films: Ann-Margret, Walter Abel, Enrique Acosta, Eddie Acuff, Brooke Adams, Eddie Albert, John Alcott (Cinematography), Fred Aldrich, Scott Alexander (Writer), Maxine Alexandre (Cinematography), Nancy Allen, John Alton, Leon Ames, Arthur Anderson, Mary Anderson, Judith Anderson, Stanley Andrews, Heather Angel, Edward Anhalt (Writer), Evelyn Ankers, George Antheil (Composer), Eve Arden, Maurice Argent, Arthur A. Arling (Cinematography), Jean Arthur, Dorothy Arzner (Director), Roscoe Ates, Edith Atwater, Georges Auric (Composer), Leah Ayers, Lew Ayres, Jim Backus, Diane Baker, Lynn Baggett, Raymond Bailey, Ann Bancroft, Elizabeth Banks (Actor/Director/Writer), Raymond J. Barry, Lionel Barrymore, George Barton, Walter Bason, Albert Bassermann, Jacob Batalon, Tyler Bates (Composer), Hubert Bath (Composer), L. Frank Baum (Novelist), David Baxt, Barbara Bel Geddes, Wallace Beery, Ed Begley, Hank Bell, James Bell, Robert Benchley, Robert Russell Bennet (Composer), Sally Benson (Writer), Henry Berman (Editor), Clem Bevans, Roger Beverly, Lynette Bernay, Alberto Bevilacqua (Writer), A.I. Bezzerides (writer), Theodore Bikel, Peter Billingsley, Herman Bing, Ole Bratt Birkeland (Writer), Joseph F. Biroc (Cinematography), Jacqueline Bisset, Larry J. Blake, Ronee Blakely, Betty Blythe, Sydney Boehm (Writer), George Boemler (Editor), Beaulah Bondi, Nancy Borgenicht, Ernest Borgnine, Matthew Boulton, George Bowler (Editor), George Bowers (Editor), Charles Boyer, Lovyss Bradly, Leigh Brackett (writer), Charles Bradshaw (Composer), Jocelyn Brando, Maryann Brandon (Editor), Elwood Bredell (Cinematography), George Brent, Helen Broderick, Norbert Brodine (Cinematography), Adam Brody, James Brolin, Hilary Brooke, Leslie Brooks, Hilary Brooke, Charles D. Brown, Peter Brown, Tod Browning (Director), Mae Bruce, Nigel Bruce, Horst Buchholz, Jan Buckingham, Victor Buono, Billie Burke, Joe Burke, Raymond Burr, Norman Burton, Tony Burton, Francis X. Bushman Jr., W.R. Burnett (Writer), Tim Burton (Director/Art Design), David Buttolph (Composer), Stephen H. Burum (Cinematographer), Dan Butler, James Caan, Susan Cabot, John Call, Charles Cane, Truman Capote (Writer), Hoagy Carmichael, Morris Carnovsky, Jack Carr, Anthony Carras (Editor), Lynn Cartwright, Antony Caruso, Bernie Casey, Agatha Christie (Novelist/Stage Writer), Claire Carleton, John Carpenter (Director/Writer/Composer/Editor), Maeline Carroll, Frances Carson, Bernie Casey, William Castle (Director), Wheaton Chamers, George Chandler, Lilyan Chauvin, Lita Chevret, Ken Christy, Eduardo Ciannelli, Al Clark (Editor), Bob Clark (Director/Writer), Fred Clark, James B. Clark (Editor), Marlene Clark, Mae Clarke, Curtiss Clayton (Editor), John Cleese, Colin Clive, Anne V. Coates (Editor), Lee J. Cobb, James Coburn, Lenore J. Coffee, Larry Cohen (Director/Writer), Tom Coleman, Heine Conklin, Derek Connolly (Writer), Walter Connolly, Russ Conway, Tom Conway, Elisha Cook Jr., Charles Cooper, Gladys Cooper, Jeane Cooper, Melville Cooper, Maxine Cooper, Tex Cooper, Wendell Corey, Mariclae Costello, Jospeh Cotton, Inez Courtney, Jerome Cowan, Tony Cox, David Cronenberg (Director/Actor), Edward Cronjager (Cinematography), Jerome Cowen, Robert Cummings, Peggy Cummins, Edward Curtis, Sidney Cutner (Composer), Charles Cyphers, Howard Da Silva, Mark Dacascos, Willen Dafoe, Royal Dano, Joe Dante, Sonia Darrin, Linda Darnell, William B. Davidson, William Davis, Laraine Day, Jules Dassin (Director), Jean De Briac, Robert De Grasse (Cinematography), Buck DeMaggio (Editor), Andre De Toth, Albert Dekker, Viña Delmar (Writer), Nick Dennis, Reginald Denny, Brad Dextor, Khigh Dhiegh, Dante DiPaolo, Dick Dickinson, Robert Emmett Dolan (Composer), Arturo Dominici, Pino Donaggio (Composer), Illeana Douglas, Sarah Douglas, Doris Dowling, Cathy Downs, Robert Downey Jr., Betsy Drake (Actor/Writer), Bob Ducsay (Editor), Howard Duff, Tommy Duggan, Margaret Dumont, Faye Dunaway, Emma Dunn, Michael J. Duthie (Editor), Robert Duvall, Shelley Duvall, Clint Eastwood, James Edwards, Robert S. Eisen (Editor), Jack Elam, Danny Elfman (Composer), James Ellison, Isobel Elsom, John Emery, Fern Emmett, Estelle Etterre, Chris Evans, Rex Evans, Francis Edward Faragoh (Writer), Dennis Farina, William Faulkner (Writer), Nat Faxon, Adrienne Fazan (Editor), Rudi Fehr (Editor), Edwige Fenech, Gabriele Ferzetti, Verna Fields (Editor), Steve Fisher (Writer), Barry Fitzgerald, Paul Fix, Joe Flood, Elizabeth Flourney, George Buck Flower, George J. Foley (Cinematography), Marcello Fondato (Writer), Joan Fontaine, Luis Forbes (Composer), Francis Ford, Gleen Ford, Robert Forster, Romana Fortini (Editor), Byron Foulger, Almeda Fowler, Scott Frank (Writer), Benjamin Franke (Composer), Christopher Franke (Composer), John Frankenheimer (Director), Bert Freed, Helen Freeman, Charles Frend (Editor), Gerald Fried (Composer), Edward Furlong, Reginald Gardiner, Tay Garnett (Director), John Gavin, Ernest L. Glesey (Writer), Gladys George, Merritt B. Gerstad (Cinematography), Frank Gerstle, John Gieguld, Billy Gilbert, Tom Gilmore, Vaughan Glaser, Scott Glenn, Willis Goldbeck (Writer), Mark Goldblatt (Editor), William Goldenberg (Editor), Jerry Goldsmith (Composer), Lisa Golm, Minna Gomball, Eiza Gonzalez, Gavin Gordon, Walter Gotell, David Goyer (Writer), Betty Grable, Richard E. Grant, Colleen Gray, Jack Dylan Grazer, Clarence Greene (Writer), Grahme Greene (Writer), Sydney Greenstreet, James Gregory, Pam Grier, Kathy Griffin, Harry Guardino, Burnett Guffey (Cinematography), Luis Guzman, Jake Gyllenhaal, Greta Gynt, Robert Haines, Alan Hale, Victor Halperin (Director), Margaret Hamilton, William Hamilton (Editor), Dashiel Hammett (Novelist), Nicholas Hammond, Cedric Hardwicke, Lumsden Hare, W. Franke Harling (Composer), Rand Harper, Marilyn Harris, Rex Harrison, Henry Hathaway (Director), Rutger Hauer, Martha Hayer, Allison Hayes, Margaret Hayes, Dan Hedaya, David Hemmings, Lance Henrickson, Buck Henry, Michael Herz (Director), Werner R. Heymann (Composer), Remy Hii, Walter Hill (Director/Writer), Brent Hinkley, Hsiao Ho, Monckton Hodge (Writer), Samuel Hoffenstein, Tom Holland (Director/Writer), Judy Holliday, Earl Holliman, John Hollis, Celeste Holm, Jack Holt, Mark Holton, Oskar Homolka, Lena Horne, James Horner (Composer), Djimon Hounsou, Leslie Howard, Ron Howard (Director/Actor), Rochelle Hudson, Rock Hudson, Ken Hughes (Director), Frank E. Hull (Editor), Henry Hull, Alan Hume (Cinematography), Holly Hunter, Leila Hyams, Peter Hyams (Cinemtography/Director), Rex Ingram, Michael Ironside, Robert Ito, Paul Ivano (Cinematography), Brion James, Gladden James, Elton John (Singer/Actor), Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, Dean Jones, Freddie Jones, Grace Jones, Darwin Joston, Nathan H. Juran (Director/Writer), Lampros Kalfuntzos, MacKinley Kantor (Writer), Bronislau Kaper (Composer), Larry Karaszewski (Writer), Boris Kaufman (Cinematography), Lloyd Kaufman (Director/Writer), Bernhard Kaun (Composer), Edward Keane, Michael Keaton, Cecil Kellaway, Nancy Kelly (Archival Footage Included), Arthur Kennedy, Ken Kercheval, jerome Kern (Composer), Deborah Kerr, Charles Kevin (Composer), Evelyn Keyes, Gary B. Kibbe (Cinematography), Udo Kier, Patrick Kilpatrick, Aton Kincaid, Tony King, Leonid Kinsky, Werner Klemperer, Bernard Knowles (Cinematography), Patric Knowles, Clarence Kolb, Clarence Kolster (Editor), Rudolph G. Kopp (Composer), Carl Kress (Editor), Otto Krueger, Jack Kruschen, Sho Kosugi, Harry Kurnitz (Writer), Nancy Kyes, John La Mesurier, Hedy Lamarr, David Landau, Martin Landau, Priscilla Lane, Jessica Lange, Ring Lardner Jr., Bobby Larson, Sydney Lassick, John Latch, John Laurie, Piper Laurie, Gabriele Lavia, Viola Lawrence (Editor), Jeni Le Gon, William Leanway (Cinematography), Chris Lebenzon, James A. Lebovitz (Cinematographer), Raymond Lebotiz (Editor), Janet Leigh, Vivien Leigh, Virgina Leith, Kasi Lemmons, Richard LeParmentier, Joan Leslie, Henri Letondal Benn W. Levy (Writer), Harry Lewis, Howard Lindsay (Writer), Desmond Llewellyn, George Lloyd, Carol Locatell, Louis R. Loeffler (Editor), Donal Logue, Frank Lovejoy, Warren Low, Edward T. Lowe Jr., Carl Lumbly, James Luisi, George Lynn, William A. Lyon (Editor), Derek Lyons, George Burr Macannan, Ranald MacDougall (Writer), Robert MacLeod, Ben Maddow, Michael Madsen, Richard Maibaum (Writer), Karl Malden, Marini Malfatti, Albert Maltz (Writer), Henry Mancini (Composer), Tom Mankiewicz (Writer), Jayne Mansfield, Frederic March, Richard Marcus, Antonio Margheriti (Director), Michael Mark, E. G. Marshall, Jaeden Martell, Lee Marvin, Marino Mase, Jean Marsh, Oliver T. Marsh, Tully Marshall, Alphonse Martell, Helen Martin, Steve Martin (Actor/Writer), Arthur Martinelli (Cinematography), Lucien Martini (Writer), Sergio Martino (Director), Marx Bros (Chico and Harpo), John Mathieson (Cinematography), Victor Mature, James McAvoy, Kevin McCarthy, Marc McClure, Ted McCord (Cinematography), Patty McCormack (Archival Footage Included), Joel McCrea, Frances McDonald, John D. McDonald (Writer), Margaret McWade, James Kevin McGuinness (Writer), Edward Meade, Donald Meek, Ben Mendelsohn, Adolphe Menjou, Heather Menzies, Gary Merrill, Thomas Middleditch, Toshiro Mifune, Vera Miles, Gene Milford (Editor), John Milius (Writer), Kristine Miller, David Miller (Director), Lee Miller, Dan Mindel (Cinematography), Cameron Mitchell, Howard M. Mitchell, Laurie Mitchell, John Mitchum, Hayao Miyazaki (Director/Writer), Juanita Moore, Victor Moore, Agnes Moorehead, Baboura Morris, Patricia Morrow, Arthur Morton (Composer), Michael Murphy, Reggie Nalder, Alan Napier, Charles Napier, Howard Negley, Shawn Nelson, Cathleen Nesbitt, Dorothy Neumann, Alfred Newman (Composer), David and Leslie Newman (Writers), Dudley Nichols (Writer), Jack Nicholson, Leonard Nimoy, David Niven, Jeanette Nolan, Kim Novak, Philip Noyce (Director), Joseph Nussbaum (Composer), Christian Nyby (Editor), Lupita Nyong’o, William H. O’Brien, Kevin O’Conner, Martha O’Driscoll, Jack O’Halloran, Ryan O’Neal, Mika Orasmaa (Cinematography), James E. Newcom (Editor), Ed O’Ross, Oscar O’Shea, Ben Oakland (Composer), Ken Olandt, Laurence Olivier, Merritt Olsen, Frank Otto, Ernest Pagano (Wroter), Riccardo Pallottini (Cinematography), Chris Pang, Dorothy Parker (Writer), Charles Paton, Elizabeth Patterson, Wolfgang Petersen, Georges Perinal (Cinematography), Valerie Perrine, Frank V. Philips (Cinematography), Joaquin Phoenix, Irving Pichel, Jack P. Pierce (Writer), Ania Pieroni, Edward Platt, Oscar Polk, Bill Pope (Cinematography), Albert Popwell, Victor Potel, Dick Powell, Dinny Powell, Tilo Prücknker, Mario Puzzo (Writer), Anthony Quayle, Milo Quesdada, Eddie Quinlin, John Sayles (Writer), Stanley Shapiro (Writer), Giuliani Raffaelli, Umberto Raho, Jane Randolph, John Randolph, Jean Ransome, Nicholas Ray (Director/Writer), Paula Raymond, Robert Redford, Manning Redwood, Alan Reed, Christopher Reeve, George Reeves, Frano Ressel, Alma Reville (Writer), Marjorie Reynolds, Ryan Reynolds, Leoda Richards, Thomas Richards (Editor), Stanley Ridges, Shane Rimmer, Antonio Rinaldi (Cinematography), Elizabeth Risdon, Margot Robbie, Beatrice Roberts, Leona Roberts, Edward G. Robinson, Mark Robson (Writer), William Roerick, Clayton Rohner, Owen Roizman (Cinematography), Greg Roland (Cinematography), Lawernce Roman (Writer), Micheal Rooker, Mickey Rooney, Harry Rosenthal, Angelo Rossitto, Ellyn Rosyln, Mickey Rourke, Russell Rouse (Writer), Charles Ruggles, Wesley Ruggles (Director), John Rusell, Rosalind Russell, Morrie Ryskind (Writer), Howard St. John, Chris Sarandon, John Saxon, William Schaller, Maximilian Schell, Lalo Schifrin (Composer), Russel F. Schoengarth (Editor), Joseph Schrank (Writer), Jean Seberg, George Segal, William A. Seiter (Director), Lorenzo Semple Jr. (Writer), Mario Serendrei (Editor), Leo Shaken (Composer), Joan Shawlee, William Shea (Editor), Martin Sheen, Reginald Sheffield, Lawrence Sher (Cinematography), Ann Sheridan, Robert Sherwood, David Shire (Composer), Howard Shore (Composer), Tony Sibbald, Don Siegal (Actor/Director), Alan Silvestre (Composer), Jean Simmons, Carl Sklover, Tess Slesinger (Writer), Walter Slezak, Everett Sloane, Brooke Smith, Charles Martin Smith, Dan Snow, Drew Snyder, Vladimir Sokoloff, Suzanne Somers, Alberto Spagnoli (Cinematography), Ned Sparks, Dorothy Spencer (Editor), Douglas Spencer, Lionel Stander, Harry Dean Stanton, Sylvester Stallone, Helene Stanton, Benito Stefanelli, Rod Steiger, John Steinbeck (Writer), John Steiner, Naomi Stevens, Onslow Stevens, Nick Stewart, Paul Stewart, Ludwig Stössel, David Strathairn, Randy Stuart, Harry Stubbs, Grady Sutton, Seijun Suzuki (Director), Joseph Sweeney, Robert Swink, Ben Taggert, Isao Tamagawa, Russ Tamblyn, Daniel Taradish (Writer), Ron Tarr, Frank Tashlin (Director and Writer), Ada and Arlene Tau, Dub Taylor, Dwight Taylor, Libby Taylor, Samuel A. Taylor (Writer), Lewis Teague (Director), Lew Temple, Fabio Testi, Thorin Thatcher, Harvey F. Thew (Writer), J. Lee Thompson (Director), Sven-Ole Thorsen, Philip Tinge, George Tobias, Marisa Tomei, Franchot Tone, John Tourette, Emerson Treacy, Lana Turner (Includes Archival Footage), Brenda Vaccaro, Lee Van Cleef, Virgina Van Upp (Writer), Evelyn Varden, Conrad Veidt, John Vernon (Archival Footage Included), Martha Vickers, Yvette Vickers, Henry Victor, George Voskovec, Sidney Wagner (Cinematography), Raymond Walburn, Bill Walker, Helen Walker, Robert Walker, Tracey Walter, Anthony Warde, David Warner, Theron Warth (Editor), Gedde Watanabe, Ken Watanbe, Lucille Watson, Keenan Ivory Waynes (Actor, Writer, and/or Director), Clifton Webb, Ferris Webster (Editor), Paul Weigel, Tuesday Weld, David Weisberg (Editor), Orson Welles (Actor, Writer, Director), Howard Wendell, Mae West (Actor/Writer), James Westerfield, Bill Weston, Garnett Weston (Writer), Christine White, Jesse White, Merrill G. White (Editor), Forest Whitiker, James Whitmore, Dame May Whitty, Patrick Whyte, Henry Wilcoxon, Harry J. Wild (Cinematography), Hagar Wilde, Kathleen Wilhoite, Rhys Williams, Robert Williams, Laureen Willoughby, Clarence Wilson, Dooley Wilson, Marie Windsor, Robert Winkler, Shelley Winters, Isabel Withers, Googie Withers, Sam Wood (Director), Teresa Wright, Jane Wyman, Junkie XL (Composer), George Worthin Yates (Writer), Bolo Yeung, Philip Yordan (Writer), Clifton Young, Gig Young, Mary Young, Susannah York, Carl Zittrer (Composer)

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31 Days of Film in December-The Rest of the Month

December 22nd-Stormy Weather from 1943 (Director: Andrew L. Stone, Writers: Jerry Horwin, Seymour B. Robinson (story), H.S. Kraft (adaptation), Stars: Lena Horne, Bill Robinson, Cab Calloway, Katherine Dunham and Fats Waller, Cinematography: Leon Shamroy, Runtime: 78 mins)

Stormy Weather is about Bill Robinson as played by Bill Robinson. Going from leaving the military to being a star and his relationship with Selina, as played by Lena Horne. There is not much of a deep story here but a lot of a cool dance movies and songs. Some pretty fabulous numbers and the story is really just a set up for them. I have no deep thoughts on the film other than its good. That and Lena Horne is a good singer but really a convincing actress. At least not here. I actually don’t remember being impressed by her in Cabin the Sky.

[Lena Horne Performs Title Song]

BONUS: Once Upon a Honeymoon from 1942 (Director: Leo McCarey, Writers: Sheridan Gibney and Leo McCarey, Stars: Cary Grant, Ginger Rogers, and Walter Slezak, Cinematography: George Barnes, Runtime: 117 mins)

Another Cary Grant film, and only my fifth Ginger Rogers movie of the year. Wow. This one as Cary playing a reporter looking into an Austrian baron who is marrying an American woman played by Ginger. He. ecomes more interested in Ginger. Eventually Ginger understands what exactly the Nazis are and wants to get away (including helping a Jewish woman and her kids flee.) Ginger ends up agreeing on helping the US war effort as does Cary. There is a lot of plot here and the film is probably fifteen minutes too long. That said, I enjoyed it.

I think I would have liked it even better dropping the WWII setting because the romcom stuff is the best. Not to undercut the dramatic work, because Cary and Ginger have a lot of great dramatic work. It just feels like two movies in one and it kind of hurts the tone. I like it but I don’t love it. Other than the two leads Albert Dekker is very good as the counter intelligence agent. Also future Marilyn Monroe acting coach Natasha Lytess as the maid Anna in her brief scenes.

Stylistically, its less interesting than director Leo McCarey’s other two films I have seen. While I am not into Duck Soup, I respect its style and effort. An Affair to Remember is a pretty film to look at. This one as some great shots but it really just stays focused in Grant and Rogers and lets them do what they need to. Which is great, but it has a slightly more dated look to it.

[Cary Grant and Ginger Rogers Scene]

GREMLINS DOUBLE FEATURE:December 23rd-Gremlins (XMAS REWATCH) from 1984 (Director: Joe Dante, Writers: Chris Columbus, Stars: Zach Galligan and Phoebe Cates, Cinematography: John Hora, Runtime: 106 mins)

Gremlins 2: The New Batch from 1990 (Director: Joe Dante, Writers: Charles S. Haas, Stars: Zach Galligan, Phoebe Cates, John Glover, Robert Prosky, Haviland Morris, Dick Miller, Jackie Joseph, Robert Picardo and Christopher Lee, Cinematography: John Hora, Runtime: 106 mins)

Every year I watch Gremlins and every year I am reminded Billy is an idiot. The first set of gremlins may have been an accident but the one batch you purposely made when seeking help from a science teacher. Why? But Gremlins is a yearly tradition, though I downgraded fro. 4.5 to just 4 stars. Still love it but its not that close to a 5 star flick for me because I have questions and concerns. Most of which disappear when the Gremlins begin rampaging.

Now, I took the annual rewatch as a reason to revisit the second film. I had vague memories of the movie. It was sillier, not as good. Yep. Billy still kind of an idiot too. The setting is neat and the Gremlins are fascinating with some very cool pieces, I do still enjoy Phoebe Cates and Dick Miller, this time also John Glover and Haviland Morris. Its good. Well, its the good sort of bad.

[Gremlins Trailer / Gremlins 2 Trailer]

December 24th-The Woman In Black from 1989 (Director: Herbet Wise, Writers: Nigel Kneale and Based on the book by Susan Hill, Stars: Adrian Rawlins, Bernard Hepton, David Daker and Pauline Moran, Cinematography: Michael Davis, Runtime: 103 mins)

That was kind of blah.

[Trailer]

XMAS REWATCH: Tim Burton’s Nightmare Before Christmas from 1993 (Director: Henry Selick, Writers: Caroline Thompson with Story by Michael McDowell and Based on Story and characters by Tim Burton, Stars: Chris Sarandon, Danny Elfman, Catherine O’Hara, William Hickey, Ken Page, Paul Reubens, Glenn Shadix, and Ed Ivory, Cinematography: Pete Kozachik, Runtime: 76 mins)

With it being the holiday season I just want to be extra lazy and after more than 300 days of trying to write reviews I am tired. But Nightmare Before Christmas is still fantastic. The music is still top notch. The voice acting sublime. The story incredibly fun. The visuals-wow. Still so stunning. My second favorite Christmas movie.

[Trailer]

Christmas Day-Santa Claus Conquers the Martians from 1964 (Director: Nicholas Webster, Writers: Paul L. Jacobson, based on a story by Glenville Mareth, Stars: John Call, Cinematography: David L. Quaid, Runtime: 81 mins)

This is indeed a film. There is a couple decent scenes that hint at something called potential. Really, its just not good though. Glad I finally watched it.

[Film]

BONUS: The Shop Around The Corner from 1940 (Director: Ernst Lubitsch, Writers: Samson Raphaelson, Ben Hecht and Based on Parfumerie/Illatszertár 1937 play by Miklós László, Stars: Margaret Sullavan, James Stewart and Frank Morgan, Cinematography: William H. Daniels, Runtime: 99 mins)

Apparently this film is a holiday standard. James Stewart and Margaret Sullavan play co-workers who do not like each other. However they have been sending anonymous love letters to one another having never met. James is having some issues with his boss but ends up the manager, also learns its Margaret has been the woman he has been corresponding with. It all ends pretty nicely.

Its a good movie but not a favorite Ernest Lubitsch flick. Though it has a nice bit of drama and some very good laughs. I think its because the best laughs come from supporting player William Tracy. Though a couple other supporting players get some good laughs. James and Margaret are food together. The cage scene being a highlight.

Yeah, I am done.

[Trailer]

December 26th-Jack the Giant Killer from 1962 (Director: Nathan H. Juran, Writers: Orville H. Hampton and Nathan H. Juran, Stars: Kerwin Mathews, Judi Meredith and Torin Thatcher, Cinematography: David S. Horsley, Runtime: 94 mins)

It has been 8 days since I gave a film 4 stars. 26 since I gave a film 4 1/2 stars. 58 since a rare 5 star. I have only given thirteen films 5 stars. Fourteen films 4 1/2. But seventy-six 4 star ratings and a whole bunch of 3 1/2 stars no doubt. Yet this month I gave 10 films under 3 stars, which might be more than any other month thus far. I have been very disappointed. A lot of forgettable, a few really bad, amd several disappointing. I really hope the next few days kick it into gear because I am not looking forward to extending this by six months now.

Oh, this film! Nice costumes, pretty dated and dull.

[Trailer]

FRITZ LANG DOUBLE FEATURE: December 27th-Ministry of Fear from 1944 (Director: Fritz Lang, Writers: Seton I. Miller and based on book by Graham Greene, Stars: Ray Milland, Cinematography: Henry Sharp, Runtime: 87 mins) -crime usb

The Big Heat from 1953 (Director: Fritz Lang, Writers: Sydney Boehm and based on a serial by William P. McGivern, Stars: Glenn Ford, Gloria Grahame and Jocelyn Brando, Cinematography: Charles Lang, Runtime: 90 mins)-comedy/crime usb

First up of this Fritz Lang double feature is Ministry of Gear. About a man played by Ray Milland who gets mixed up with a spy ring. The how is a bit much, winning a cake at a little pop up festival thing. His decision to pursue why he was attacked and all that, a little much, but hey-its a classic.

I am sounding a big dismissive but there is a lot of good. Ray Milland is fantastic. He always is fantastic. Charming through out and serious when the part calls for it. Ray Millands performance allows for you to forget the story is silly. I wish the other performers were up there with him but not to say they are bad by any means. Everyone is doing their part, its just their roles rarely call for much. Still Carl Esmond is quite good, and Hillary Brooke gets a scene to shine. I wish Marjorie Reynolds had more then play the love interest because there are scenes where she feels too good for the material.

Luckily this is Fritz Lang so him and his team do bring some real visual power to this flick. Elevating the picture. The seance sequence is cool, the set with the ministry is impressive, I though the bomb scene was effective for a 1940s flick. This is a quality looking film right here with some tense moments. I liked it more than what I have seen the last few days, I just kind of expected more after the last few Lang movies I saw were so good.

After a break (where I watched The Girl Who Knew Too Much, which was change for the US and retitled Evil Eye) I am back with another Fritz Lang. The Big Heat follows a detective, played by Glenn Ford, look into the apparent suicide of a fellow officer. The investigation takes him to the deceased officers mistress and soon she is dead. As Glenn pushes his wife dies in an explosion meant for him. So now he is operating outside the law. Along the way he meets Gloria Grahame who plays a gangster moll.

While not as visually stunning as Ministry of Fear, Big Heat has a stronger story. Also where as Ministry of Fear is carried specifically by Ray Milland here we got a cast with more to do. Glenn Ford does not match Milland for me but he is good. Plus Gloria is great in the final act. Seriously, at first I was thinking she was kind of wasted. I love her in In A Lonely Place but the flip switches half way through and then she goes off. Loved it.

This film is tight, pretty briskly paced as it rolls forward. A bit predictable in points but it doesn’t change the work on screen. The gangsters are assholes, Ford is tough, and Lang is great at staging action. His team makes good to great looking crime and noir films. While not the homerun I felt I needed after several days of very few standouts, this was an overall good film day.

[Ministry of Fear Trailer / The Big Heat Trailer]

NICOLE KIDMAN DOUBLE FEATURE: December 28th-BMX Bandits from 1983 (Director: Brian Trenchard-Smith, Writers: Patrick Edgeworth and Based on Screenplay by Russell Hagg, Stars: Nicole Kidman, Cinematography: John Seale, Runtime: 88 mins)

To Die For from 1995 (Director: Gus Van Sant, Writers: Buck Henry and Based on book by Joyce Maynard, Stars: Nicole Kidman, Matt Dillon, and Joaquin Phoenix, Cinematography: Eric Alan Edwards, Runtime: 106 mins)

First I watched Nicole Kidmans first major feature role, an Australian crime comedy BMX Bandits. A dumb little film about teenagers who find a bunch of hidden walkie talkies that some gang wants to use for some big heist. Problem is they go over a wavelength so people can eavesdrop. Stuff happens, teenagers win, there is a new bike park. Yep.

The film looks pretty good with its bright 80s style. Score was pretty cool. The film started fine but progressively gets less interesting as it goes. Which is a shame because of the potential. It starts to break into some silly chase and shenanigans flick without the chases being that fun. However we get Nicole Kidman in BMX gear and bike going down a water tunnel slide. So that was cool. Still, blows its potential by not being either crazier or by being more serious.

From that to To Die For with Joaquin Phoenix, Matt Dillon and more. Toe Die For is very loosely based on the Pamela Short case. So an older woman seduces a teenage boy who then murders her husband. That’s the jist of it and this film is done in partial mockumentary style so we have characters relating their story directly to the camera. It also has a left field ending that definitely caught me off guard as I had skimmed the Pamela Smart wikipedia.

This was definitely the best film I had seen in a week or so. Nicole Kidman is funny, beautiful, charming and scary. Her work as Suzanne Stone is fantastic and she is so good with Dillon, Phoenix and actress Alison Folland. I never seen Alison before and felt the work between the two was amazing. Like when Kidman is changing in a dressing room or at the food court. Famtastic scenes. Alisons segments in the mockumentary scenes are among the best in the film. I like how it mostly ends with her. No slight to the others-Dillon is good but his part is the least interesting as the victim. Phoenix is very good, somewhat sympathetic. I do like the parents (played my Kurtwood Smith, Holland Taylor, Dan Hedaya and Maria Tucci) as well as Illeana Douglas as Dillons sister. Stack cast but Kidman is the standout and Alison Folland should have broken out.

It is a stylish film in the way it dresses Suzanne, dresses her home, and stages the scenes. Not fancy but has a standout look. The way its edited together-and I rarely notice editing, it just put together so well. From the start to the multi screen finish. Well, the real finish is Illeana ice skating while Season of the Witch plays during the credits. Its definitely a black comedy and while not entirely hilarious its amusing and fun through and through. Definitely a keeper.

[BMX Bandits Film w/Ads / To Die For Trailer]

IT’S ALL ABOUT MAKING MILLIONS DOUBLE FEATURE: December 29th-How to Marry a Millionaire from 1953 (Director: Jean Negulesco, Writers: Nunnally Johnson and Based on The Greeks Had a Word for It by Zoë Akins and Loco by Dale Eunson and Katherine Albert, Stars: Betty Grable, Marilyn Monroe, Lauren Bacall with William Powell, David Wayne, Rory Calhoun, and Cameron Mitchell, Cinematography: Joseph MacDonald, Runtime: 95 mins)

How To Steal A Million from 1966 (Director: William Wyler, Writers: Harry Kurnitz and Based on Venus Rising by George Bradshaw, Stars: Audrey Hepburn, Peter O’Toole, Eli Wallach and Hugh Griffith, Cinematography: Charles Lang, Runtime: 123 mins)

I don’t feel like writing a review. I liked both. How To Marry A Millionaire more so and How to Steal A Million very close to being less then 3 stars. But seriously, see How to Marry a Millionaire. The ladies are fantastic.

[How To Marry A Millionaire Trailer / How To Steal A Million Trailer]

1950s NOIR DOUBLE FEATURE: December 30th-Pickup On South street from 1953 (Director/Writer: Samuel Fullerand based on story by Dwight Taylor, Stars: Richard Widmark, Jean Peters, and Thelma Ritter, Cinematography: Joseph MacDonald, Runtime: 80 mins)-comedy/crime usb

The Big Combo from 1955 (Director: Joseph H. Lewis, Writers: Philip Yordan, Stars: Cornel Wilde, Richard Conte and Brian Donlevy, and Jean Wallace, Cinematography: John Alton, Runtime: 87 mins)

The first film I watched, Pickup on South Street, is a crime noir with cold war politics mixed in. A pickpocket named Skil gets a piece of film that was to be delivered to a communist agent. The feds were watching the carrier, Candy, and with the cops are on the case while the pickpocket is looking for a bigger score.

Richard Widmark is in asshole mode, which is where he is best. He is a good heroic type in Panic in the Streets but playing jerks is what he was made for and honest-I really wanted him to die. Seriously the ending and the writing around Candy’s character is what knocks this great noir down a few pegs. Widmark doesn’t care about politics, okay fine. But using Candy as a reason to get him into the fight and redeem he was an eyeroll. So it got a sorta Hollywood ending for two characters I think she have died. Widmark because his character is a jerk. Camdy because of her dumb decisions.

Now that the negatives are out of the way lets get to what I like about the story. Everything else. The set up is great, the tension builds damn well, there are great scenes through out. Samuel Fuller and his team have put together a fine looking, well paced, thriller. Yeah I found Candy’s arc dumb but Jean Peters commits. A great performance for such a stupid character. I think the cop and the fed are very good. Then there is Thelma Ritter as Mo. She rules every scene she is in. The one with the police captain and fed are great. I buy why she would not give up skip to the commies to. Her arc is just well done.

Despite some frustrating decisions and eye roll moments, this classic noir lived up to its high rating.

Then I watched The Big Combo, which features one of the more iconic noir images which I used above. It was good, but not a favorite. The story of a detective hellbent on getting gang leader Brown and helping his moll who feels trapped. The story follows his investigation and all the obstacles being thrown in his way. Brown working over time to keep Detective Diamond from getting close.

Cornel Wilde is good, but I don’t ever find him great. He usually feels overshadowed in the couple films I have seen him in. Not so much here but Richard Conte is eating the scenery in all his scenes. I think most the performances are just fine, would have liked more with Helene Stanton who crushes all her scenes. Lead actress Jean Wallace and Helen Walker are both good too. Beside the acting being mostly fine, this film does have slightly cheaper look. Props to the team for still making so,e sequences-spefpcifically the airport scenes, pack a punch.

Big Combo is appointment noir for hardcore fans of the genre but I don’t think its a great film. Director Joseph H. Lewis Gun Crazy is the superior work in his catalog. But Big Combo is good, maybe very good. But that’s just my opinion.

[Pickup On South Street Trailer / The Big Combo]

December 31st-Monkey Business from 1952 (Director: Howard Hawks, Writers: Ben Hecht, Charles Lederer, I. A. L. Diamond with Plot by Harry Segall, Stars: Cary Grant, Ginger Rogers, Charles Coburn, and Marilyn Monroe, Cinematography: Milton R. Krasner, Runtime: 97 mins)

Ginger Rogers is indeed a treasure.

[Trailer]

2019 is done!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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Top 10 Films from the Decades

Since I was working on my favorite films of the decade list I decided to go back and look through the decades from the 30s to now. Before we start here are some things to know.

1. All based on my Letterboxd account scores.
2. I give a lot of 3 stars, a good amount of 4 stars, but I rarely go higher than that. I don’t know why. With how much I love films I should give more 5 stars.
3. 80s was my childhood, 90s were the teenage years. So I gave more five stars at the time. Trust me, some of my choices may seem shocking. I don’t care, I love what I love.
4. Only three decades I did an Honorable Mention for. Those were the unranked 5 stars.
5. I like horror and cult films and I grew up on comics, so excuse me.

1930s
Almost 100 Films According to Letterboxd
1. Trouble in Paradise-1932 pre-code romantic comedy directed by Ernest Lubitsch and starring Herbert Marshall, Miriam Hopkins, Jay Francis and Edward Everett Horton. First seen at a Ernest Lubitsch Double Feature at UCLA. My fave romcom.

2. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde-1931 film featuring Frederic March who won an Oscar for his performance. Directed by Rouben Mamoulian and co-starring Miriam Hopkins. First saw in October of 2018 when doing pre-80s horror films all month long. It was early on in the month and cast a long shadow. From TCM recording to buying a Warner Archives DVD real quick.

3. It Happened One Night-1934 pre-code screwball romcom directed by Frank Capra and starring Clark Gable and Claudette Colbert.First of only three films to win the Academy Awards Big 5. Best film director, actor, actress, and a one of the screenplay awards. First seen in high school and it holds up every time I watch it.

4. The Public Enemy-William A. Wellman directs James Cagney in the iconic pre-code 1931 gangster flick. Features Jean Harlow, Joan Blondell and more. First seen March of this year, 2019. Wow. I couldn’t stop thinking about it for days after.

5. King Kong-The fnatasy creature feature classic from 1933, directed by Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack featuring Fay Wray. I don’t remember when I initially saw this but was this decade. Probably because I bought a cheap DVD copy at Best Buy. After I watched it I started thinking of how the Peter Jackson film just failed on every level.

6. Fury-Fritz Lang’s first US film starring Spencer Tracy and Sylvia Sidney which came out in 1936. A crime drama I first saw this year, 2019. I was really gripped by it. Rewatched it a month ago with one of my uncles who never saw it, and it was just as great.

7. The Bride of Frankenstein-The 1935 sequel to Frankenstein with James Whale, Boris Karloff and Colin clive returning. Also featuring Elsa Lanchester as the Bride of the Monster and Mary Shelley. I like this one more than Frankenstein because its a little weirder, more gothic. However I think both films need each other. Saw both back to back shortly after getting DVR. Recorded off TCM some years back.

8. Wife vs Secretary-Clarence Brown directed this 1936 drama with Clark Gable, Myrna Loy, Jean Harlow and James Stewart in an early role. I love me Jean Harlow and watched this back to back with Libeled Lady earlier in the year. Both were fantastic but this one really got to me.

9. The Wizard of Oz-The 1939 classic with Judy Garland and directed by Victor Fleming. Saw it a few times as a kid, was indifferent to it. This year saw it on a big screen and it hit different that time. Wow.

10. Bringing Up Baby-Howard Hawks 1938 screwball comedy starring Cary Grant and Katherine Hepburn. It had me rolling the first time, though not as much the second but still thought it was awesome. Fun, easy watch.

1940s
Over 130 Films According to Letterboxd
1. Notorious-Alfred Hitchcocks 1946 spy thriller romance starring Cary Grant, Ingrid Bergman and Claude Rains. Bought this randomly on DVD a decade ago, liked it then. Watched it this year when I popped open my Criterion blu-ray and it shot up to tie with North by Northwest as my third fave Hitchcock film.

2. Stray Dog-Akira Kurosawa’s 1949 crime film is considered the birth of the buddy cop film as young detective played by Toshiro Mifune is team with the veteran played by Takashi Shimura on a case. I was shown this by one of my uncles (different one) and loved it back in the mid 2000s. Bought that Criterion and seen it a few more times including a rewatch this year. One of the best.

3. Philadelphia Story-Another film I saw years prior (in fact, same cinema class I watched It Happened One Night in), had no real love for, but then on a rewatch as an adult fell in love with it. Directed by George Cukor and starring Katherine Hepburn, Cary Grant, and Oscar winner James Stewart.

4. The Strawberry Blonde-Raoul Walsh directed this 1941 romcom with James Cagney, Olivia De Havilland and Rita Hayworth. Watched it this year because one of my uncles loves this film. I ended up really liking it, then almost rewatching it immediately which made me love it.

5. Citizen Kane-My “watch a film everyday in 2019” started with Citizen Kane. It was a movie I avoided due to its significance. Well, Orson Welles film is really that damn good.

6. The Best Years Of Our Lives-One of my podcasts covers films on the AFI Top 100 and this one came up early last month. Was dreading a near 3 hour picture but HOLY SHIT did I love this. Major Oscar winner with Frederic March, Dana Andres, Harold Russell, Myrna Loy and Teresa Wright. Directed by William Wyler. This was beautiful.

7. White Heat-Only seen this Raoul Walsh directed gangster film once and it was a kick to the chest. Still sticks with me. I really need to rewatch it since its been a while and plan to in 2020. Starring James Cagney, Virginia Mayo, and Edmond O’Brien it came out in 1949.

8. Too Late For Tears-Another film I saw this year of 2019 (I think in September), and was floored by Byron Haskins noir cult classic starring Lizabeth Scott who was brilliant. I watched three films with her in the same day, this being the last one and it lacked a major male star like Humphrey Bogart or Dick Powell. Yet this was the one that was the best of the bunch.

9. Sullivan’s Travel-Picked this one up during a Criterion half off sale in 2018, popped it open for this crazy 2019 watch. Wow. Everyone told me I would like and they were right about this Preston Sturges 1941 comedy with Joel McCrea and the gorgeous Veronica Lake.

10. The Uninvited-2018 October horror watch theme was pre-80s and a couple weeks before I realized I lacked films from the 40s and 50s. So I got this Lewis Allen ghost film from 1944 with Ray Milland. It has a weird light drama tone that becomes more serious as it progressed into a supernatural mystery. A wonderful classic supernatural film.

1950s
Over 130 Films According to Letterboxd
1. Seven Samurai-Akira Kurosawa’s 1954 epic that set an action standard. Toshiro Mifune, Takashi Shimura and so many more. I watched this for the first time in early in 2000s, catching it as it just started one day. Then was gifted a VHS copy. Few years later on the Criterion. One of my four favorite films.

2. Dial M for Murder-Another of my four favorite films, and my fav Hitchcock. Dial M for Murder with Ray Milland, Grace Kelly, Robert Cummings and John Williams. I love this film that Hitchcock does not think of as one of his essential films. Also released in 1954 I picked up a used copy early this decade and I have watched that copy several times and whenever its on TCM.

3. Rear Window-My second favorite Hitchcock film which came out the same year as my favorite of his films and its the same year as Seven Samurai. 1954 was awesome for films. James Stewart and Grace Kelly star in this oft imitated thriller classic. Saw it some years again TCM, rewatched it this year and was even more astounded.

4. Night of the Hunter-I picked up this 1955 thriller years ago based purely on reputation. I thought it was pretty amazing and looked forward to revisiting for this 2019 film experiment. A DVD case mishap forced me to purchase a blu-ray copy but it was worth it. This was even better the second time. The only feature film directed by acclaimed actor Charles Laughton and starring Robert Mitchum, Shelley Winters, and Lillian Gish.

5. North by Northwest-Another Hitchcock classic, and tied with Notorious as my third favorite of his films. Starring Cary Grant with Eve Marie Saint and James Mason, this is the big cross country thriller her had been building to with the 39 Steps and the Saboteur. Got it as gift one Christmas and enjoyed it. Enjoyed it more on repeat viewings.

6. Witness for the Prosecution-My favorite Billy Wilder movie. Saw it after most of his more famous films and this is the one I love. From 1957 with Tyrone Power, Marlene Dietrich, Charles Laughton, and Elsa Lanchester it is a fantastic courtroom noir drama. Also, Marlene Dietrich stunned me so much I was upset she never got an Oscar nom for this.

7. Singing in the Rain-One of the first old classics I really liked. Forget when I saw this originally but imagine it was high school and later rewatched it on VHS. Was genuinely surprised to like it. I guess being a teenager didn’t expect to like an old movie musical but this 1952 Gene Kelly flick was fantastic.

8. In A Lonely Place-A 1950 movie I only saw just this year is my favorite Humprey Bogart flick, and my favorite Gloria Grahme flick. A slow. Urn noir thriller that makes me wish we got a horror flick with Bogart as the baddie.

9. Sudden Fear-1952 thriller starring Joan Crawford with Jack Palance and Gloria Grahme. I had this on DVR and was one of the first flicks I kicked off my long 2019 watch with. Well, mid to late January. Anyway this flick made me want to watch more Crawford films. A fantastic thriller.

10. TIE: Hidden Fortress and Born Yesterday-Tough decision so went with both. I caught Hidden Fortress early cable one morning, my second Akira Kurosawa flick. This one has those elements you see George Lucas borrowed for Star Ward. A fantastic Toshiro Mifune led Samurai action adventure from 1958. Born Yesterday I caught on the flight to Texas. I sat next to my grandmom and hooked up the headphone splicer and we both watched on my tablet. So a cool memory and a fantastic film from 1950.

1960s
Over 140 Films According to Letterboxd
1. Night of the Living Dead-This film is why I don’t trust the AFI Top 100. A masterpiece in horror and independent filmmaking, changing the film landscape forever. George Romero directed and co-wrote this zombie film in 1968 that stars Duane Jones. A game changer. Only saw it last year and with my brother, we were both astounded.

2. Psycho-Alfred Hitchcocks most famous film. Psycho (and Michael Powell’s Peeping Tom a few months befor) changed horror. So many imitators popped up and influenced the giallo films of Italy and then eventually the early slasher films. Starring Janet Leigh, Anthony Perkins and more. This is an easy one to rewatch. Always good.

3. The Innocents-The same year I watched Night of the Living Dead as well as 1931 Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde and 1944 Uninvited I watched this. A last minute addition to my planned line up, Jack Clayton’s 1961 horror classic is one of the most gorgeous gothic films ever. Starring Deborah Kerr in one of her most famous roles. I shudder at thinking of the newest adaptations of this films source material in 2020. Well, the one in January but the TV show might turn out fine.

4. In The Heat of the Night-Norman Jewison 1967 crime film classic starring Sidney Poitier and Rod Steiger. Another film I only seen recently (in 2018) but was impressed. Lives up to its reputation as one of the best.

5. Cape Fear-Back in September I caught this 1962 neo-noir thriller early on. It hyped me up. Directed by J. Lee Thompson and starring iconic Gregory Peck and Robert Mitchum. This was so anxiety inducing. I watched the Scorsese version at the end of September and it did not come close for me.

6. Burn, With, Burn (aka Night of the Eagle)-Okay, so the first time I did 31 Horror Films in October it was a travesty. However there were a couple movies that I did end up loving and this is one of them. Sidney Hayers witch film really pulled me in during a month of mostly forgettable films and trash. When I saw it in blu-ray a few years back it held up. Starring Peter Wyngarde and Janet Blair, I am in the urge to put it on right now.

7. Disney’s Jungle Book-Come on…

8. Carnival of Souls-This was a random purchase one year, just saw a pre order on Amazon and read the summary and said to myself ‘Cool.’ When I watched it was amazed by this 1962 supernatural horror flick. Herk Harvey’s film is too good for it to have been his single narrative feature. A strange, wonderful horror film.

9. Tokyo Drifter-Seijun Suzuki is one of Japan’s most interesting and important filmmakers. I have only been able to catch a couple of his flicks but each are incredibly stylish gangster films. This, Tokyo Drifter from 1966, is one of the coolest looking films I have ever seen. I need to check his films out on Prime next year.

10. One Two Three-A random pick some months ago. Liked Billy Wilder and liked James Cagney so I checked out this 1961 fast paced screwy comedy and loved it.

1970s
Over 180 Films According to Letterboxd
1. Phantom of the Paradise-Brian De Palma’s 1974 horror rock opera is fucking amazing! Paul Williams, William Finley and Jessica Harper star in this crazy, tragic film. Saw it in my mid teens on Encore and loved it. Got the DVD and the a few years ago a souped up special edition blu-ray. My favorite musical.

2. Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory-My favorite kids film, which I saw as a kid and continue to watch as an adult. Mel Stuart 1971 musical starring Gene Wilder is o e of the all time favorites. Also, Marilyn Manson made a music video based on the boat ride (Dope Hat) and redid the speech from it on the opening of Portrait of an American Family. I just put that out because I love Marilyn Manson, and love this movie.

3. Disneys The Aristocats-I like Disney animated films, I love this one from 1970. I seen it once or twice as a kid, don’t remember what I thought but saw it on Netflix a few years ago and loved it. Such a sweet film. When I did the Disney movie club it was one of my first purchases. Just a feel good flick.

4. Blazing Saddles-Mel Brooks classic with Gene Wilder and Cleavon Little from 1974, co-written by Richard Pryor. I loved this film in my mid to late teens, through the early adulthood, but was kind of worried to watch it again this year. Nope, still awesome.

5. Star Wars-Its Star Wars, come on.

6. Alien-Ridley Scotts 1979 film with Sigourney Weaver remains a classic. Saw it in the big screen this year too. The effects, design, and look are even more impressive. I forget when I first saw this film but Tower Records was still around in Torrance, California. So… a while ago. Maybe it was when it became FYE. which also disappeared from around here.

7. Superman-I first saw this 1978 film as a child, not a fan of superman and probably indifferent to it. Saw it a few more times but jump to Netflix in my early thirties, wow. Bought in on blu-ray and even. ore wow. I think seeing so many MCU films and then seeing this bumped it up. The construction and pacing is so different then modern superhero films. Christopher Reeves, Margot Kidder and Gene Hackman lead an amazing cast including Marlon Brando and Glenn Ford.

8. Black Christmas-Bob Clark’s other holiday classic. 1974 slasher before they were called slashers stars Olivia Hussey and features Margot Kidder and John Saxon. It is dark, creepy and a holiday staple. It also, pre-dating slasher tropes, so much more than 90% of the subgenre. I say this as a lover of slashers.

9. Jaws-Steven Spielberg’s 1975 film kicked off the summer blockbuster. It is to blame but its fantastic. Saw it in high school originally and it always better when I rewatch.

10. Monty Python and the Holy Grail-Come on, its great.

1980s
Almost 400 Films According to Letterboxd
1. Beetlejuice-Saw this 1988 Tim Burton classic as a kid, in theaters. Now I own 3 shirts. Seriously. I love Beetlejuice and when I say I watch it once a year, it is the truth. All time fave. With Michael Keaton, Winona Ryder (first crush), Alec Baldwin, Geena Davis, and Catherine O’Hara.

2. Batman-My second all time favorite, also from Tim Burton and Michael Keaton with Jack Nicholson and Kim Basinger. I remember 1989 Batmania. I remember the Prince jams. A fantastic moment in time. I also watch this every year.

3. A Nightmare On Elm Street-Freddy Krueger scared me as a kid. Legit. Seen bits and pieces of this 1984 Wes Craven film, eventually picking up a VHS copy in the late 90s. It still holds up and having seen a lot of slashers from the 80s, gave the subgenre a shot in the arm it needed. Nancy, as played by Heather Langenkamp, is my favorite horror film final girl.

4. Who Framed Roger Rabbit?-Robert Zemeckis 1988 masterpiece is one of my all time favorites. Okay, every 80s fil.m mentioned is. Saw this o e in theaters, use to watch a taped copy all the time, and anxiously awaited the blu-ray which I bought right away. A masterpiece.

5. Jackie Chans Police Story-Not to be confused by Crime Story, this 1985 action flick is one of Jackie Chans masterpieces. With several amazing stunts, boundary pushing action sequences, and stunning fights. It is built around moments but it works and remains one of the gold standards in action films.

6. Robocop-The 1987 scifi action flick by Paul Verhoeven is still dark, heavy and brilliant. Peter Weller and Nancy Allen lead a fantastic cast in an all timer. They should never had made sequels to this.

7. The Empire Strikes Back-Like it better than Star Wars.

8. Kiki’s Delivery Service-My favorite film from animation legend Hayao Miyazaki. One of the most acclaimed filmmakers of Japan. This sweet kids film I first had a glimpse of as a teen, but just the ending. Eventually Disney licensed Miyazaki’s films and I got to see a Disney dub of this film (its a great dub) and it did not disappoint. This is just one of the most feel good films. It screens every year thanks to Ghibli Fest and soon will be o digital to purchase or stream through HBO Max. I love this one.

9. John Carpenters They Live-This was tough. The Thing is probably John Carpenters best movie and Big Trouble in Little China his most rewatchable. However I went with 1988 They Live. Bought it (and the Thing) in a film set years ago and both amazed me but this one hit on another level. Starring wrestling legend Roddy Piper, They Live was not just amazing but I see how it has become more relevant now then it was at the time. Great stuff.

10. The Masters of the Universe-I grew up on He-Man so I still stand by this film adaptation with Dolph Lundgren and Frank Langella as a work of art. I am in the minority and I do not care. I watched this movie so much as a child you would not believe.

Honorable Mentions: A Nightmare On Elm Street 3: The Dream Warriors, Akira, Aliens, Evil Dead 2, Ghostbusters, John Carpenters Big Trouble in Little China, John Carpenters The Thing, Project A-Ko, Return of the Living Dead, Transformers: The (Animated) Movie

1990s
Almost 550 Films According to Letterboxd
1. Jurassic Park-Steven Speilbergs 1993 hit. This was a tough choice for my top spot this was it during the mid 90s.

2. Batman Returns-Tim Burtons 1992 sequel to his 1989 monstrous hit. Keaton is back and joined with Michelle Pfeifer, Danny DeVito, and Christopher Walken. My favorite Christmas movie.

3. LA Confidential-I saw this at a time when I was still not terribly fascinated with crime and gangster movies. This 1997 film starring Russell Crowe, Guy Pierce, Kim Basinger and others was directed by Curtis Hanson.

4. Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles-TMNT film from 1990 does not get enough love as one of the best comic book adaptations. On top of having fantastic looking Ninja Turtles. After Batman, this was the flick of my childhood. And it was for the longest, the biggest independtly made film.

5. Dick Tracy-I love this four color comic adaptation from Warren Beatty and co-starring Al Pacino. Made in 1990.

6. The Nightmare Before Christmas-Tim Burton and Henry Selicks iconic stop motion Christmas/Halloween film.

7. The Fifth Element-The crazy scifi actioneer with Bruce Willis, Gary Oldman, and Milla Jovovich that dropped in 1997.

8. The People Under the Stairs-Wes Craven’s 1991 dark fairy tale about gentrification and class structure became one of the black horror film classics. I saw this on basic cable repeatedly as a teenager and went on to get the DVD and then the awesome blu-ray. It remains one of my all time favorites.

9. Perfect Blue-Satoshi Kon was one of Japan’s most talented animation directors. His film Paprika predates Christopher Nolan’s Inception and this film, was a favorite of Darren Aronofsky before he made Black Swan. A psychological thriller about a struggling popstar turned actress being stalked by a crazed fan. It came out back in 1997 and there was a new blu-ray released in March of 2019.

10. Hackers-I love this stupid film.

Honorable Mentions: Army of Darkness, Batman: The Mask of the Phantasm, Beavis and Butthead Do America, The Crow, Eat Drink Man Woman, The Mask, Police Story 3 aka Supercop, Preadtor 2, Scream, Wes Cravens New Nightmare,

2000s
Over 450 Films According to Letterboxd
1. Pans Labyrinth-Gullermo Del Toros 2006 foriegn language dark fantasy masterpiece is spectacular. A scary, tragic and beautiful film.

2. The Incredibles-I guess this is my favorite Pixar film.

3. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon-Saw it in theaters, watched a bootleg in a high school film class, actually paid attention to an Oscars broadcast. This was it in 2000. The film I was obsessed with and it had Chow Yun Fat and Michelle Yeoh. Thanks Ang Lee.

4. Spirited Away-Saw it during its one week run at the El Capitan, saw it when Disney rereleased it to theaters after it won the Oscar, saw it in 2018 during Ghibli fest. Plus own the DVD. Hayao Miyazaki’s fantasy classic is one of the all time great animated films.

5. Hot Fuzz-Saw this with my brother when it first came out. We were rolling. Edgar Wright’s buddy cop action comedy is still a go to for me.

6. Lilo & Stitch-2002 Lilo and Stitch is such a warm, fun, lovely film. With gorgeous art. Did not feel like a Disney film when it dropped those many years ago.

7. Mr. And Mrs. Smith-2005 action romance with Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie. I don’t know why I like this film so much but I do. It might because it was one of the first films I got when I got DVD player, and of that early set of films it was the one I played the most.

8. Death Proof-Weird this Tarantino film would make a top 10 list. Its not his “best” film but its my favorite. Plays into cult cinema which I love with such a cool cast of women and Kurt Russell. 2007 Death Proof is my most watched Quentin Tarantino flick.

9. The Royal Tenenbaums-Wes Andersen’s 2001 family comedy with one hell of an ensemble cast. I forget how I first saw this one, but I know I watched it on cable anytime I saw it was on. For like a year.

10. Whale Rider-Fuck the MPAA for giving this family film a PG-13 rating. I think that slight controversy is why I saw it in theaters because I was not the person to seek out dramatic films like this. Still ain’t unless it was made before 1970. Point is, I love this 2002 film starring Keisha Castle-Hughes.

2010s
Almost 400 Films According to Letterboxd
1. Dredd-This 2012 film with Karl Urban donning the helmet of the famous British comic book charctaer took my low expectations and made me walk up super hyped. I have watched it at least once every year since.

2. Cabin in the Woods-The Drew Goddard and Joss Whedon meta-horror flick was originally my 2012 film, but slipped under Dredd. Yet both are top of my 2010 list. I love this film and it was around this time I started transitioning from casual horror fan to hardcore horror fan.

3. The Handmaiden-I saw this Park Chan-wok when it was released in 2016, and really loved it. It might have been my fave film of that year. The rewatch this year hit me even harder this year and shot up. Such a beautiful, smart, fantastic masterpiece.

4. Captain America: Winter Soldier-The 2014 sequel is my favorite MCU film. Russo brothers takeover and Chris Evans is joined by Scarlett Johansson and Anthony Mackie for a big superhero espionage thriller.

5. Nice Guys-Actually this was my favorite 2016 film, or tied with Handaiden. I had so much fun with Shane Blacks comedy mystery starring Russell Crowe and Ryan Gosling. Its one of those films I can put in whatever. Actually, all but Handmaiden is a whenever type of film.

6. Black Panther-It seems most of my all time favorites movies from 1970s are very rewatchable. Black Panther is the same. Ryan Cooglers 2018 superhero epic starring an amazing cast lead by Chadwick Boseman and Michael B. Jordan is a stylish action flick.

7. A Simple Favor-2018 delivered several fantastic films, most of my faves were superhero films. However A Simple Favor slipped in and made me laugh. Paul Feig’s comedy-mystery-thriller with Blake Lively and Anna Kendrick is something that I enjoyed so much. Its not doing anything super special but i would rather rewatch this than most films.

8. Us-My 2019 favorite film by Jordan Peele starring Lupita Nyong’o is a stylish horror film. It looks great, has amazing visuals, and great performances. I saw it twice in theaters, the second time with my brother and loved it more than the first time. Such a cool film.

9. I, Tonya-The only film on this list I probably won’t do very much of rewatching. Though a rewatch in 2018 when my uncle was showing it during our family reunion is why I rate it so high. From 2017, this Margot Robbie is definitely my favorite biopic.

10. Spider-Man: Into the Spider Verse-I guess my favorite Spider-Man film?

Honorable Mentions: Once Upon A Time In Hollywood, One Cut of the Dead, Thor Ragnarok, Three Identical Strangers

2019
Only watched 35 films this year. In lieu of a write up, just going to put star ratings from my Letterboxd.
1. Us-*****

2. Once Upon A Time In Hollywood-*****

3. Parasite-****1/2

4. Knives Out-****1/2

5. Ready or Not-****

6. Shazam!-****

7. Rocketman-****

9. Dolemite Is My Name-****

9. Crawl-****

10. Avengers: Endgame-****

One Cut of the Dead was released in the US in 2019, but originally out in 2017. Gave that a full *****.

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